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Comment reply on tabascosauz's Completed Build: #3 - Ivy Bridge Obstinacy

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Wasn't too hard. H440 has plenty of space in the back, if you don't mind the foam.

Comment reply on aludka's Completed Build: The SRSP Project

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

The issue with the weight of behemoths like the D15 and TC14PE are mostly, if not completely irrelevant. The mounting system employed by Noctua (Secufirm2) and Phanteks are very similar and very robust. Graphics card sag is a much more urgent issue.

Comment reply on Vespereus's Completed Build: The Black Swan

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Did you forget to bring the I/O shield from the Alienware?

Nice job rounding out the older rig, by the way.

Comment reply on Blaze101xx's Completed Build: The Flash.

  • 62 months ago
  • 0 points

I always love it when people recognize that the 212 EVO is not the only 120mm air cooler on the market. I embrace the TC12DX and U12S equally; it's nice to see a Phanteks cooler residing in a Phanteks case. Phanteks makes a genuine effort to bring high-end quality to a mainstream, affordable price range. Blue RAM is a pleasant addition to the Z97 Extreme3.

I'm also glad that you've chosen the B2 750 over something like the CX750M. Nice build. As for the RAM issues, it sounds like you may have a memory leak. A larger set of 16GB or 32GB will not resolve a memory leak; you have to determine the program that has the bug, and look for possible solutions. This behavior is not normal. My ultrabook used to suffer from a buggy version of Chrome that was plagued with a memory leak; I don't remember if I actively changed anything to resolve the issue, or the bug was simply fixed with the next Chrome update.

Comment reply on tabascosauz's Completed Build: #4 - Savant of Swindon

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

I was still pleased that XFX got their hands on some softer ribbon cable; the ribbon on Corsair's RM PSUs is pretty notorious for its inflexibility. In the end, the TS550's cables are still miles ahead of my G2 750's black sleeved cables. It's a shame that EVGA doesn't yet know how make cables properly; you're also making me feel bad, what with your Mini R2 build and my Mini R2 build on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to tidiness lol.

By the way, what camera do you shoot with?

Comment reply on tabascosauz's Completed Build: #4 - Savant of Swindon

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, man. The original intention was to for this build to be modeled a bit after your media PC, but after the build, the similarities began and ended at the SG08. I realized that I needed a little more oomph on the graphics side than a R7 250X could offer; since I was already dropping the low-profile, single-slot ISK310 for the standard-height, double-slot SG08, "why not go for Pitcairn?" was my thought.

And of course, without the experience you had and without the ST45SF-G, the TS550 turned into cable medusa. But I think I managed to make it work.

Comment reply on tabascosauz's Completed Build: #4 - Savant of Swindon

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you. I write a lot, so nowadays when I write a description, it comes out much longer than expected. I still try to keep it concise.

Comment reply on tabascosauz's Completed Build: #4 - Savant of Swindon

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you! I hope that the page displays the total $ spent, as I've encountered plenty of builds in the past few months that, despite appearing to have individual part prices, have part lists that culminate in a total of $0. I hope mine doesn't do the same.

To be honest, I prepared for a lot of the imminent "you should have bought a GTX 750 Ti" or "-1 because R7 265" or "shoulda gotten a R9 270X for that price", so it's nice to see people who actually deign to read my descriptions. They are very lengthy.

Comment reply on tabascosauz's Completed Build: #4 - Savant of Swindon

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Lmao, I did not expect this. It's a reference to the novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon, my favourite read of all time. I'll try not to spoil it, but the main character is an autistic boy who is brilliantly intelligent and goes on an adventure away from his hometown of Swindon.

This is strange, because before I published this build, googling "savant of swindon" would bring up a book review of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time at about the 4th entry on the page, but now it has been replaced by a link to my build. I suppose the reference wasn't easy to catch. In all likelihood, 15-16 Milton Road, Swindon, will be the address of some random guy as the book is, unfortunately, fiction. I would definitely recommend this book, as plenty of book critics before me have also done.

Thank you for the kind words!

Comment reply on renigadecrew's Completed Build: Budget Performance PC

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

That's good news for me. It looks like a AM3+ office rig sans dGPU is viable after all...

For an OEM alternative, this is not bad at all. Nice work.

Comment reply on renigadecrew's Completed Build: Budget Performance PC

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

How is the HD 3000 on the 78LMT? Enough to run Aero without serious lag? I haven't seen someone using the 78LMT's integrated graphics for a very, very long time.

Comment reply on MortiseAndTenon's Completed Build: My First Build

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

If you are lucky enough to find it on sale, the Noctua U12S is an impeccable cooler. If you can deal with the brown (I personally love the Noctua colors), it's the perfect balance of low noise, high performance and quality in a 120mm cooler.

If you can't deal with the color, the Phanteks TC12DX is another alternative. It edges out the U12S in terms of performance, but loses a bit in terms of noise. The ETS-T40 (especially the White Cluster, it looks absolutely fantastic!) is also a good choice comparable to the U12S, but if you have $60, a U12S/TC12DX/T40-W is on a completely different, higher tier of quality (and probably in performance) compared to a entry-level Asetek AIO like the H55.

Comment reply on goosenuts's Completed Build: No. 1674

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Finally! The Sabertooth Mark S!

This is surely an all-star build. Mark S, 3000MHz Avexirs (Damn! Love those LEDs), HOF 980s...man, you've done it all. Very nice work. Tell me, is that an eloop in the back?

Comment reply on veystass's Completed Build: Mini Oculus Rift PC - NCase M1

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

A U9S? How lovely! I like your choice of Redux and IPPC fans too. Overall a very well-done, sharp-looking M1 build.

Comment reply on xacloman's Completed Build: Build 1: Christmas ITX Gift for Father

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

"Ashes of Problem Employees"

That little red jar made my day. It's very nice of you to bring your father up to date with solid state storage. Nice ISK 110 build.

Comment reply on Zedzer's Completed Build: Fridge for Geeks V3

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Damn. That sucks. I know quite a few people who are in the 4.5GHz @ 1.30-1.35V ballpark. I think it's the BIOS settings that are the problem, but in the case that it's actually the CPU...that would be incredibly rare and unfortunate.

My Z97MX Gaming 5 has the exact same BIOS as your board, and it's a pain. It, and the fact that the 4790K is already fast enough, prevent me from wanting to tinker with CPU OC. For an experienced overclocker, it might not be a big deal, but DualBIOS is still a frustrating mess (this time with eyecandy) compared to MSI's ClickBIOS and Asus' UEFI. If it makes it easier, you can switch to classic mode to look for those settings; I found it simpler with fewer confusing tabs to leaf through.

Good luck; that G3258 is really begging to be overclocked.

Comment reply on Zedzer's Completed Build: Fridge for Geeks V3

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

What numbers for vcore are you running? On stock voltage, the G3258 can only go so far...gotta up the vcore.

Comment reply on Zedzer's Completed Build: Fridge for Geeks V3

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Why would it be a bottleneck? The G3258 still incorporates the same Haswell core as every other LGA1150 CPU.

Maybe the G3258 would struggle in games such as FC4 (at first) and BF4, where more than 2 threads are used regularly, but that should probably lie outside the definition of bottlenecking, since it's not an issue of IPC or clockspeed but the absence of HT.

Comment reply on zachsgranada's Completed Build: My Beast

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

You don't need to stray into 4.5GHz+ territory to witness Haswell's incredible heat output. The LGA115x stock cooler keeps my i7-3770 and E3-1230V2, both IVB CPUs, under 80°C at full load. By comparison, even my U9B cannot keep my 4790K under 85°C at full load. Stock clocks, of course.

Haswell Refresh CPUs are no different from their older Haswell counterparts aside from a clock speed bump. Devil's Canyon CPUs, like the 4790K, are the ones with (somewhat) superior thermal characteristics; these CPUs are, however, still far from cool. At full load, DC's new TIM doesn't make a huge difference, a few degrees at most over the 4770K.

Comment reply on oberon13's Completed Build: PipsKweek Obygreenz

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

An air heavyweight like the TC14PE on a G3258? :P Interesting choice.

Nice build; I really do like the finish on the Metis.

Comment reply on dgoudie's Completed Build: His name is Oak. :D

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

The U12S earns an instant +1 in this case. I love that cooler to bits! I just received one to replace my veteran U9B, and it's simply fantastic for my 4790K.

The 990FX NB doesn't add much in terms of features, but 990FX boards are almost always of higher quality (extra controller-driven features, VRMs, heatsinks, PCIe layout, etc.) than ones that belong to the 970 lineup. And on AM3+, this is what some people consider to very important. VRM quality is of utmost importance here; the D3P is pretty bog standard 4+1, but it does come from Gigabyte, which I consider to be a plus and a little extra peace of mind. As long as you don't try to push the 8350 too hard, you won't see much of a difference between the 970A-D3P and say, a 990FXA-UD3. Users of the M5A97 series of boards and 970A-G43/46 can attest to the importance of good VRM design.

Comment reply on Purplefrsh's Completed Build: Purple's Pleasure Palace: Don't Hassle the HoF Edition

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Those HOF cards are gorgeous, as with the past revisions of this build...but that dust is horrendous! I don't know how you manage to put up with it.

Comment reply on Strebord's Completed Build: Cooler Master 110

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

This is in pursuit of a portable gaming rig, I presume? Not much can be derived from the title and description. This looks to be a good, compact build.

It's nice to see photos of the R9 270X ITX. May I ask why you opted for a single 4GB stick of RAM?

Comment reply on zachsgranada's Completed Build: My Beast

  • 63 months ago
  • 9 points

I'm still not sure why people even bother to purchase questionable power supplies such as this one. A good PSU goes a long way in providing the rest of your system with clean power.

That 4790K must be working pretty well for you, especially as an upgrade from a E5400, but that's a lot of money spent on bragging rights and a somewhat unbalanced gaming rig. Also not sure what the deal is with "i7 for multitasking" these days; everyone must surely be falling for Intel's marketing. An i3-4130 can "multitask" pretty well, methinks.

Comment reply on Eschaton's Build Guide: The Real Entry Level ($500 USD or LESS) Gaming Build

  • 64 months ago
  • 3 points

Everything varies. That's why parametric part choices are the way to go for people who truly care about building at the lowest price possible.

CPUs and boards go on and off sale all the time. A X4 860K might be handily cheaper than the G3258, with a similarly reduced A88XM-D3H or E45, and skyrocket up to $100 the next day.

Comment reply on Spree47's Completed Build: My Project

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Damn...the 650D is getting rare these days. Nice to see one housing some new, high-end hardware.

Comment reply on Galgoth's Completed Build: Build 669

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

So...you buy into AMD's marketing? You think that the FX-4300 is four true cores? Better go back to the drawing board and learn to rethink what you think "cores" are.

Intel's Haswell core is extremely potent. You don't need to understand IPC to witness the single-threaded performance of the i3-4130, which is identical to that of the i5-4690K and i7-4790K (barring the clockspeed difference).

Comment reply on Galgoth's Completed Build: Build 669

  • 64 months ago
  • 3 points

i3s are anything but weak. Not sure why an upgrade is so urgent?

Comment reply on adkotahajesban's Completed Build: Gaming Rig - First ever build

  • 64 months ago
  • 2 points

$35 spent on Silverstone's extensions, widely considered to be some of the best that one can buy on the mainstream market. Don't you think the $35 would warrant a bit more time spent on tidying those cables? Extensions aren't a 1-click-to-solve-all-your-cable-management-problems solution.

Great part selection, and I'm really digging the ARC 100, but if you worked on cable management as hard as you appeared to have worked in the BIOS, it might be a bit prettier.

Comment reply on Pcrusen's Completed Build: Hadron: Mini Gaming/Workstation

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

The "much better" aspect needs some addressing. As a 4790K owner, I can confidently say that at full load, DC isn't very different from Haswell in terms of thermal characteristics. At low loads, DC's new TIM really shines, but when the chip is under stress, it's still Haswell.

It's still Haswell. The 4790K is basically a better binned, re-pasted 4770K. And so there's no reason why Prime95 wouldn't do the same thing to the 4790K. Even with the TIM upgrade, the temps will be minimally better. The "upgrade" was mostly just hype from pre-launch Intel fans.

Comment reply on Pcrusen's Completed Build: Hadron: Mini Gaming/Workstation

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Eyyyyyy

No Prime95, please. Please don't listen to him. Prime95 temps are not reasonable Haswell temps, for no other application uses AVX extensions quite like Prime95 does. And you don't need the massively added heat that Prime95 applies. For the love of god, I've been recommending OCCT for so long and no one listens. Prime95 should never touch Haswell. Sure, it may be possible to tweak the settings so the test doesn't request unreasonable voltages, but Haswell literally burns with Prime95.

To put it in perspective, not even a properly-installed H105 can maintain a temperature under 70°C, under very cool airflow, when the 4790K it's cooling is hit with Prime95 on auto voltage. Just use OCCT.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Wanting to buy tonight, should I?"

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

The Z97S Krait would work, but if it's the color scheme you're shooting for, the Z97-AR might suit you better. There are reports of DOA Krait boards; it might have something to do with the Z97 Krait's budget lineage (aside from appearance, most of its components seem to be identical to those of the budget board Z97 SLI Plus).

Not sure what above user considers "expensive". One does not simply pair a i5-4690K with a $80 budget board.

Comment reply on canebarbone's Completed Build: Entry-level all rounder

  • 64 months ago
  • 3 points

I'm not sure why you keep insisting on applying your definition of performance segments to other peoples' builds. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and many parts in this build can be considered "entry-level".

Comment reply on mikeob's Completed Build: Mike's Budget Streaming PC / CPU Intensive

  • 64 months ago
  • 4 points

Most entertaining comment in quite a while. Hyper-Threading is an Intel proprietary technology. AMD's CMT works differently, but for practical purposes, offers more or less the same performance benefits/penalties.

Comment reply on Pcrusen's Completed Build: Hadron: Mini Gaming/Workstation

  • 64 months ago
  • 0 points

I'm not sure that 65°C is possible for a 4790K @ 4.5GHz, all cores loaded at 100%. You must have absolutely insane airflow to sustain such an overclock at less than 70°C on a U9B.

Aside from that, this is quite a fancy little workstation. Nice work!

Comment reply on davydcr's Completed Build: DCR ITX Build

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Smart of you to mention that Bulldozer CPUs are technically pin-compatible with AM3, and are supported by some AM3 boards; however, ITX boards would technically only be capable of handling the FX-4100 and FX-6100. A 125W TDP is out of the reach of ITX boards, which would already struggle with VRM longevity under the 95W of triple module CPUs. The Asus M4A88T-I, for example, does not support first-generation FX.

Surely sad for consumers, but a smart move from an electrical and customer support perspective, since cramming a northbridge, southbridge, a decent 125W+ capable VRM, as well as their heatsinks into 17 x 17cm board is generally not a good idea.

Comment reply on Brobiwan_Kenobi's Completed Build: The unlocked one

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Intel wins because of an easy IPC advantage over CMT. Had AMD put serious effort into evolving K10 instead of developing Bulldozer, there would be much less of a performance gap, assuming AMD's core design continued at the predicted pace.

Comment reply on Brobiwan_Kenobi's Completed Build: The unlocked one

  • 64 months ago
  • 3 points

The whole Seagate vs. WD discussion is purely opinion-based. Ask one man and he will recommend Seagate, while another will swear only by WD.

Anyhow, the Intel fanboy has "intel" in his name. Coincidence? I think not.

Comment reply on davydcr's Completed Build: DCR ITX Build

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Hard to find? More like impossible, because AM3+ ITX boards don't physically exist.

Comment reply on wwwilde's Completed Build: White Knight

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

The point of the 850 Evo is massively increased endurance, to the point where TLC V-NAND is comparable to regular MLC in maximum writes.

Speed hasn't been improved much in SATA 6Gbps drives since about a year ago. The 850 Evo, in addition, does not appear to suffer from the same critical bug affecting the 840 Evo.

Comment reply on sketch24's Completed Build: My "too stubborn to pay for return shipping for NVIDIAs lies" build.

  • 64 months ago
  • 9 points

Smart choice. No one should be returning their GTX 970s unless they play regularly at 4K. The card is still a fine card; it's just that the same cannot be said about Nvidia's practices and values as a company.

Comment reply on bamccoley's Completed Build: White Encoder

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build in every department. I must say that I am quite envious of your setup; A 500GB SSD was not in my budget at the time, so I had to opt for a WD Blue, which limits me to using the bottom drive cage. And what a nuisance that was!

Your reasoning behind the fan placement is very valid, but with an H100i, the difference in CPU temps would be insignificant. And considering that the 4790K isn't much more capable than the 4770K at reaching 5GHz, the exhaust at the bottom isn't really necessary; if anything I feel like it will take airflow away from your GTX 970.

Comment reply on brad18white's Completed Build: Budget Beast

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Decrease performance? I've never heard of a higher freq RAM kit decreasing performance on a dGPU system.

If you mean higher latency from looser timings, then sure. But higher freq at an equivalent timing doesn't decrease performance. For OP 1600 C9 would work fine, and 2133 C11 is more or less equivalent and would at worst provide the same performance. That is, of course, barring AMD's weak memory controllers...and the fact that OP did spend too much.

Not bad for a first time, though.

Comment reply on andoh's Completed Build: Ragnarok

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Inside of a build that doesn't exist?

Comment reply on mark3748's Completed Build: 2015 Update

  • 64 months ago
  • 0 points

I did not refer to the heat transfer properties of aluminum vs. copper. If that grinds your gears very often, it might suit you well to read others' comments a little more closely.

We all know that aluminum has better thermal characteristics than copper. In an AIO, it's not this that's the problem. Fractal Design's Kelvin series and Swiftech H220X are, more or less, the only AIO systems with a copper block and a copper rad. You want to see what having a copper block and aluminum rad in a single water system does?

AIOs cheap out by having an aluminum rad. This causes problems with corrosion down the road.

Comment reply on mark3748's Completed Build: 2015 Update

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're looking to Tom's Hardware Forums for answers, you're most certainly looking in the wrong place.

It's wrong to assume that all 360mm rads perform better than 240mm rads. For starters, TPU just reviewed Deepcool's new 360mm rad a few days ago, and it was outperformed by the D15.

Furthermore, AIO rads are most often inferior to the real enthusiast rads. 99% are aluminum, and are paired with fans that cannot handle their often high FPI. Quality, expensive, 360mm copper rads on the market for custom loops don't suffer from such limitations.

And in response to the user above who described building custom loops as "just for the wow factor", I invite you to take a look at any well-built loop, paying close attention to their temps and especially their noise levels in comparison to what they might be like on air or on AIO.

Comment reply on Felix_conker's Completed Build: My friend's budget build

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

A little error on my part...I meant to say 4-2-3-1 going from left to right. Slot 4 is the leftmost one, slot 1 is the rightmost one, etc.

I own the Z97MX-Gaming 5, and if there's one thing Gigabyte needs to improve as soon as possible it would be the DIMM numbering. There are very few people who read RTL, and I don't see why numbering them 1-3-2-4 would be problematic in any way. Anyways, the completely unintuitive numbering scheme is somewhat helpful in my opinion, because on boards numbered 1-2-3-4 users would more often make the mistake of putting DIMMs side by side in 1 and 2, 3 and 4, or even worse, 2 and 3.

Comment reply on wwwilde's Completed Build: White Knight

  • 64 months ago
  • 2 points

Looks like you've really committed to the "quality" aspect of your rig. Which is why you are currently doing your entire build a grave injustice by posting nothing more than a nondescript photo of the empty case's exterior.

I'd love to see how the Sabertooth Mark S looks inside of the Storn Stryker. Nice build, but get to it!

Comment reply on Felix_conker's Completed Build: My friend's budget build

  • 64 months ago
  • 3 points

That's not what he meant.

The A88XM-D3H, like most boards with 4 DIMM slots has its slots numbered 4-2-3-1 going from right to left. With 2 DIMMs, you either fill 1 and 2, or 3 and 4. In other words, the DIMMs should have one and exactly one empty slot between them regardless of if they are in 3 and 4, or in 1 and 2. Not side-by-side as you have them.

It shouldn't matter all that much in your average build, but AMD CPUs and APUs generally have weaker memory controllers than Intel CPUs, so even in a CPU+dGPU system, you should usually opt for a proper dual-channel setup.

Comment reply on Reflects's Completed Build: AMD Entry Level Gaming/Editing PC

  • 64 months ago
  • 2 points

In the casual sense, yes. The Graphics Processing Unit is what handles all the graphics as the name suggests, so "video card" and "graphics card" are often used synonymously and interchangeably with the term "GPU". And in a day-to-day context, this is correct.

In the technical sense, no. That is incorrect. The GPU is like a CPU; it's the actual piece of silicon usually smack in the middle of a graphics card. In this particular context, you might see "GPU" and "GPU core" used synonymously. If you remove the cooler and wipe away the paste, you'll see a square die that looks like a CPU, albeit a little bit bigger and without a silver heatspreader. This is the GPU. The "graphics card" is everything the GPU sits on (basically the rest of the circuit board), and includes the VRAM, fan header(s), and the VRMs that support the GPU core. These are not the "GPU core". An example would be Nvidia's GK104 or GK110, or AMD's Tahiti XT or Hawaii XT; these four are examples of GPUs. These four are respectively used in the GTX 680, GTX 780, R9 280X and R9 280X; these are "graphics cards".

In short, you can use them interchangeably and usually won't get picked on.

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