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Comments

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

The bottom cable is a SATA power connector. The top cable is the LED cable which connects to the Commander Pro.

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Thanks so much. That little box that connects all of the RGB cables from the fans isn't actually a Node Pro. It's the RGB hub that comes with a three pack of LL120 fans (also comes with the 500D RGB SE case since the three pack of fans is included). This RGB hub connects to the Commander Pro to control all of the RGB LEDs from the fans (each fan has both an RGB cable and the power cable). The Commander Pro will power and control the six fans and up to four LED strips. You can connect the LED strip directly to the Commander Pro, but again, the Commander Pro needs that RGB hub for the fans since it doesn't accept the individual RGB cables from the fans directly. Hope that helps answer your question. There are actually helpful diagrams on how the cables are connected properly on the Corsair forums which usually come up right away from a google search. Actually, I just realized that this RGB hub might now be outdated since there is a new device called the Lighting Node Core. I think this unit directly handles the RGB cables without need for the RGB hub. You might need to do a bit of research on this.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RX5700XT or RTX 2070"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Gamers Nexus just released a video yesterday about good 5700 XT models based on price, thermals, and noise. The best overall 5700 XT was the Gigabyte Gaming OC followed by the Sapphire Pulse and I think the Power Color Red Dragon. If you don't care about DXR (direct x ray tracing), then go with one of those. If you do care about DXR, there is no choice: go with a 2070 Super (whichever is cheapest as they are all fine).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB vs Power Colour Red Devil 5700xt"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

These cards are very close to each other in performance at 1440p, so it's all about whether or not you care about real time ray traced effects (DXR or RTX for short). If DXR does interest you, then there really is no choice as you have to go with the 2070 Super. While frames do suffer with DXR on, I've found that DLSS does seem to be improving (at least in Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Metro Exodus, they went from blurry mess to nearly indistinguishable from DLSS off, though these games are several months old now). At least for me, I'm looking forward to playing Cyberpunk, Vampire, and even Minecraft with DXR, but I can understand if you wouldn't care about it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What brand 2080 Ti?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

These cards get hot, and the amount of heat that they produce doesn't simply go away because you have a better cooler. A better cooler simply transfers heat away from your card and exhausts it into your room more efficiently. So no matter which 2080 Ti you get, they all will heat your room up.

If you don't care for overclocking and you don't care about quiet cards, you could just go for the cheapest 2080 Ti you can get. The Zotac Twin is $1049 USD at the time of this post. The more expensive models overclock better as they have better binned parts (the die and the memory), and they have beefier coolers that give you more overclocking headroom.

Comment reply on crynomical's Completed Build: hmmmm i need to stop putting money into this thing

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Three keyboards and three mice? How many hands do you have? Can we see your setup?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NZXT Kraken help pls"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, the logo will be rotated as well, but at least you can use the cooler with all four RAM sticks. As far as functionality, everything will be fine as NZXT even does this on their BLD service for prebuilts (their cooler plus four RAM sticks). As for me, I ended up giving the X72 Kraken to my brother for his build with only two stick of memory while I changed to a Corsair AIO with a smaller pump head.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AIO pump connection to motherboard"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

You don't have to always have the pump running at full speed. At least for me, I've been always using either NZXT or Corsair so I've always set the pump speeds in CAM or iCUE (I've never messed with pump speeds in UEFI/BIOS). I generally run the pump on the "balanced" setting which is usually around 80% I think. I wouldn't run it lower than that if you ever mess with it. If you don't touch it in your BIOS, I think it always does just run at max by default.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AIO pump connection to motherboard"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

It doesn't matter. I've tried both and it makes no difference. Some boards don't like it if you turn it on without a fan or pump connected to the CPU FAN header. It really doesn't matter though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NZXT Kraken help pls"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

You just have to rotate the pump head counter clockwise by 90 degrees so that the tubes come out the top of the cooler. That will give you the clearance you need for the memory. I know because it's the exact same with the MSI MEG Z390 Ace board and the NZXT Kraken coolers (I have the X72). Also, do not let the memory sticks bend. This actually ruined the DIMM slot on my board (the memory is fine) and forced me to RMA the board.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Future proof case?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I like what the other comment mentioned in the 011 XL and the 500D RGB SE as those are some of my favorite cases. I have the 500D RGB SE in a build if you want to check it out (can click next to my username). While I do love the case, if you plan on water cooling, it might be a tad on the smaller side. It can fit a slim 360, 240, and 120, but the reservoir/pump mounting will have to be on the 360 front rad and you need to have a video card under 300mm in length (if you want to fit the front rad and reservoir). Otherwise, it does come with nice fans and the Commander Pro which is a fan and RGB lighting hub. You need to use iCUE but I actually like the software as it controls my AIO and headset (also my memory RGB). Also, the 500D has just about every feature that I expect from a premium case: solid build quality, decent airflow, hinged tempered glass side panels, and front USB C port.

The 011 XL is also a great choice but won't have hinged side panels that swing open (I absolutely love these for easy access to the inside of my case, even if I don't really open it all that much anymore), and it doesn't come with any fans (which may not bother you, but in the end it will be a bit more expensive than the 500D RGB SE). It does have a lot more room for water cooling though.

I have looked at a lot of other cases from Phanteks, Thermaltake, Cooler Master, Corsair, and NZXT. The only ones that really stuck out to me are the Cooler Master SL600M, Thermaltake A500, and Phanteks Evolve X. NZXT's newer offerings don't really appeal much to me (maybe the H510 regular version for a budget build as it's solid for the price), and I didn't really see anything from Fractal that I liked aesthetically (which is why I don't mention them at all). For water cooling, you should definitely check out the Evolve X and A500. Some great builds from GGF Events on youtube in those cases.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2080Ti comparison"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

You're paying for better cooling and better binned parts like the GPU and memory. For instance, my 2080 Ti FTW3 Ultra from EVGA can do +100 core and +1000 memory easily like another user posted here. All of that with the same ~68C load temp (with ambient temp of 26-27C in my room). If you can afford a higher priced model, you probably should get it. At least comparing to a youtuber who was showing benchmarks for the EVGA 2080 Ti Black (similar CPU and RAM playing at 1440p max settings so more GPU bound anyway), my FTW3 Ultra in the same spot in Battlefield 5 was giving me +15-20fps while playing at a higher resolution (1440p ultrawide). I know that is pretty dramatic, but part of it is likely because that 2080 Ti Black was likely throttling at 85C while mine was still at 68C. But again, better binned parts and better cooling.

Comment reply on ss6ve's Completed Build: Finally Evolved

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Congrats and great job! Solid and beautiful looking build. Definitely deserves some more pictures!

Comment reply on SPathos's Completed Build: Divorce Maker

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Haha nice. Anyway, of course I'm kidding. Nice rig and congrats to your daughter soon ;)

Comment reply on SPathos's Completed Build: Divorce Maker

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Hold on, you went all out on this build, yet you cheaped out on the X570? Why no Aorus Xtreme X570? We got that same desk from IKEA though :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H150i Pro placement in O11 dynamic"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

When choosing between thermals and aesthetics, I would always go for thermals first. I don't think dust is such a big deal for the second option as honestly, dusting out your system every month or so would only take you like 10 minutes. You could mount the radiator on the side and set it to exhaust and go bottom intake and top exhaust. It creates a negative pressure setup instead, keeps the aesthetics you want, and doesn't sandwich the hot air in the middle as your second option. Again, the concern about dust and negative pressure honestly just baffles me as a simple dusting of your system every month or so shouldn't be such a big deal. In any case, it would definitely be better than the second option.

Comment reply on Cavi's Completed Build: The Adjudicator

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Great job in stretching your budget! Impressive what you managed to get, both in performance and aesthetics. While I recently built an overkill RGB system, my next planned build is very similar to what you've got: all air and no RGB. I'm a bit torn between be quiet and Noctua, but I have at least a couple of years to figure it out. This is some pretty great inspiration and a great showing for Noctua though. Thanks for sharing and congrats on your build!

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

It's a solid board. Never had any issues with it. All of the features work as advertised and one of the problems I had with a previous board (Gigabyte Aorus Ultra Z390 wouldn't let me use my M.2 NVMe as a boot drive) was never a problem with this board. As far as overclocking, there is a physical knob on the board that automatically OCs the chip and works fine but slightly overvolts the CPU (totally stable as long as your cooler is up to it). Of course you can manually OC which I have as well, and so far after almost six months, I have never had any issues with it. Overall, I feel like this is one of the better Z390 boards that isn't totally overkill like those $500 boards. Also, I ilke MSI's UEFI/BIOS a lot more than Gigabyte's.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Push Pull Good Or Bad?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, you can keep the 200mm fans for aesthetics. They will not hinder airflow, though it's possible that they may create some turbulence in the case with those 120mm fans behind the rad. The only thing that will do is probably create a bit of extra noise (may or may not be noticeable, and I may also be full of crap... I think it really depends on the fan speeds of the 200mm and 120mm fans). I don't believe push/pull will lower your air flow at all.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thermaltake or Corsair"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem! And for this generation, since you mentioned gaming and workstation, it would definitely have to be AMD. The 3900X isn't far behind the 9900K for gaming, and as far as other multi threaded workloads, it smokes the 9900K in all except Adobe Premiere due to Intel Quick Sync. I'm only gaming and I purchased parts for my system back in March, so that's why I'm still with Intel. Also, I believe the 3950X which is the 16c/32t chip is due out next month (last I heard it was still September), so maybe look into that as well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thermaltake or Corsair"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm a big fan of Corsair (you can check out my build) and I love iCUE for setting fan speeds and checking liquid temps. That said, after viewing tons of completed builds, especially custom loops, I really like Thermaltake's products. If I wanted to go full custom loop, I wouldn't get Corsair's water blocks. From what I've read and watched online, the CPU block is pretty cheap and the GPU block, at least for me, doesn't do it aesthetically. I have an EVGA card so I would just get one of their Hydro Copper blocks and maybe get the EK block (I have an MSI MEG Z390 Ace and they have a specific mono block just for that board). I don't mind the pump/res from Corsair though, especially since I can link it to my Commander Pro to control in iCUE.

In any case, if I had to go with a single ecosystem for all parts, I would probably go with Thermaltake as they have really beautiful fans (Riing Trio RGB look awesome even as exhaust or viewed from the side) and CPU blocks.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Push Pull Good Or Bad?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

200mm fans are quite bad for pushing air through radiator fin stacks. That said, you are still mounting the stock Aer P fans on the back of the X72, and that is already good enough by itself. The 200mm fans in front pushing air won't really make that much of a difference. Even adding the proper 120mm fans to the front won't make that much of a difference as you get huge diminishing returns on push/pull fan configurations (also diminishing returns for case fans as well). Since you aren't really spending anything extra, it should be fine.

Just to give some reference, Gamers Nexus just published a video like 5 hours prior to this post regarding a new 200mm AIO from Cooler Master. In the same video, they explain pretty much the exact things I mentioned in the first paragraph. It's an interesting video anyway so I recommend you check it out (it's only 13mins).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EVGA B-Stock Deals (8/28/2019)"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Just leaving my associate code for users to get a 5-10% discount at check out: 77AZ9YDU58R6SSG

It won't work on B-Stock or to users outside of the United States, but hopefully someone can find it useful in the future.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Be Quiet! as radiator fans"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The Silent Wings 3 fans are much better static pressure fans than those Shadow Wings (compared the ratings on be quiet's own site). Just based on what I saw, the Shadow Wings 120 max out at 1100 RPM which is pretty slow, but obviously they are silent. The pressure only shows as 0.82mm/H20 however. The Silent Wings 3 120 spin up to 1450 RPM and push 1.79mm/H20 at almost the same noise level 15.9dBA vs 16.4dBA on the Silent Wings 3. I would advise against the high speed PWM versions as those somehow broke for me every time I've used them. They just randomly go nuts and spin up to max RPM which is around 2200 and then ramp back down to the speed I set them at (which is usually 50%). When they spin up to full, they are loud (I mean those high speed PWM ones). Don't get those as you don't really need to run them that fast as 1450 is plenty (and still quiet). If I go for a silence focused non RGB build, I will definitely go with those in the future (Silent Wings 3 120mm fans).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cheapest place to buy custom liquid cooling parts"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

That's about right. For Corsair and EK full custom loops via their configuration tool, it ends up around $800-$1000 for me as well (just depending on things like fans, fan hubs or splitters, and extra 90 degree adapters). Do not buy cheaper parts from a place you do not trust (perhaps a lesser known company that doesn't have good customer service). If you mix metals, like maybe that cheap place says that it's a copper block but it's actually aluminum, you will have problems with your loop.

Sometimes places like EK will have sales like if you purchase a block, you'll get some free fittings, but I rarely see any big discounts on custom loop water cooling products. Don't cheap out on them. As others have said, if you want cheap, go with an AIO.

As for me, I spent a lot of time researching tutorials and checking out completed builds for inspiration, even parted out a list and planned my own loop on paper. In the end, it's just too expensive for me to justify, even with a top of the line system with not much left to upgrade for me. I'd rather spend that money to buy my wife a nice laptop or buy my brother a new video card. Because honestly, even after checking thermals from others who have completed builds, it's not really that impressive and there's not that much more I can squeeze out of my 9900k and 2080 Ti. It's not like it's gonna get me +20fps or anything. I'm already able to reach my max OC potential under ambient conditions, just can't sustain it for longer than 20-30 minutes (and that gain is maybe 5-8fps on the games I play at maxed settings). So yeah, just not worth it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Lian li PC 011 razer vs Corsair 680x"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm a huge fan of Corsair (can check my build for proof) and I love cases with lots of glass and hinged swinging side panels. That said, I saw many reviews and builds with the 680x and I was not impressed. Especially against the O11, the temps just aren't as good, and the extra space with the PSU in the side compartment is just wasted on the 680x. If you are spending $250 on a case, better get the one I have (500D RGB SE) as it comes with 3 LL120s and a Commander Pro. I dunno, just looks like the 680x doesn't have very good use of space, especially if you want to water cool and mount multiple radiators. If it's only between these two cases you listed, it's easily the O11 for me, even being a big fan of Corsair.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Learning how cooling works"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

There is a lot of great information here and I just want to add my experience in cooling my hardware. I'm using a 240mm AIO for my CPU and just the stock air cooler for my video card (it's the EVGA 2080 Ti FTW3 Ultra). At first, I was thinking that this would be temporary until I went full custom loop, but I spent a lot of time thinking after watching hours and hours of tutorials (loop planning, tube bending, learning about each individual part in the loop, filling, draining, bleeding the air from the loop, maintenance, and tons of finished builds to get ideas for my own loop). Even after all of this and then picking the parts I wanted and planning my loop, in the end, I realized that nearly $1000 for all of this isn't worth it.

While my build is pretty much top of the line and I don't need the money for upgrades, I could take that grand and buy a nice laptop for my wife, or upgrade my brother's video card, or even take a trip somewhere with my wife among countless other things I could do with that money. Also, after watching many videos and benchmarks regarding the thermals and noise, it seems like my planned loop would barely improve thermals (I already have acceptable temps) and honestly, my system is already very quiet (I make more noise from my keyboard and mouse, and even my chair). I actually kinda wish that I went with an air cooler for my CPU, but they can be pretty large and I think I might have clearance issues with my memory.

Anyway, I'm mostly just trying to say that I don't think custom water cooling is worth it, even with a top of the line system. I'm not really concerned with the maintenance, but when new parts come out that you want to upgrade to, with a hard line loop, you pretty much have to drain the entire system to swap out one part. Then you have to refill and bleed out the air, maybe spend at least half an hour to leak test again to make sure you tightened everything properly, etc. AIOs are fine, but I think that's the limit as far as water cooling for my system.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus Prime Z390-A Good enough for 9900kf?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

That's not true. Some boards with really cheap VRMs like the ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming 4 have VRMs that will throttle even stock boost for the 9900k. I've seen those boards throttle the boost down to 4.5GHz from the stock 4.7GHz after 20 minutes under load. That said, I believe this board should be able to handle the 9900k at stock at least.

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem. Technically there is room for the top to have a 360mm radiator, but the fan tray won't allow it. The front and top both use the exact same dimensions for the removable fan trays, but the layout for fan vents and screw holes are different. The front tray has room for a 360mm radiator or 280mm with the appropriate fan vents while the top allows for 240mm and 280mm radiators. You can swap the fan trays if you wish, but then the front glass panel will look rather empty with only two 120mm or 140mm fans. I'm not sure if Corsair sells an extra fan tray for this case, but I suppose if you found it, you could replace the top fan tray to allow the 360mm rad. So yes, technically it would fit, but Corsair doesn't give you the appropriate fan trays for it. I suppose they wanted to keep the pressure balanced for 3 front intake fans and 2 top exhaust and 1 rear exhaust. Having 3 top exhaust would make the pressure negative assuming you filled all the fan mounts and ran all fans at the same RPM.

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

If you mean for the current case that I'm using (500D RGB SE), no, there is only room for a 240 or 280mm rad on top. I didn't bother with the 280mm because the vent holes on top for the fan tray are meant for 120mm fans (the original LL140s that I had on top were pretty much wasted which is another part of why I returned them). In general, if you have the option of front or top mounting a rad, front mounting will always give better CPU temps at the cost of slightly warmer GPU temps and top mounting will leave you with warmer CPU temps but slightly cooler GPU temps (but it will vary from case to case). For me though, if I can't have the tubes coming out from the bottom of the rad (which is difficult for a 360mm rad as they aren't long enough or your video card will prevent it unless vertically mounted), I will top mount it. This is due to the possibility of air bubbles getting trapped in the rad if you have the tubes coming out of the top. This happened to me while I was using the NZXT X72 Kraken and I ended up sending it back (RMA) for a new one. It's possible to work the air bubbles out on your own, but it wouldn't work for me and that clicking noise was pretty loud and annoying. Also, it's more important for me to have slightly cooler GPU temps as gaming with my settings in always GPU bound (so I have slightly more room to overclock).

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

In a room that is usually around 25C, my temps for gaming at 5.0GHz (1.32v) were usually around 65-70C. As for the fans, on the front, there were LL120s and on the back I had the stock ML120 fans. If you check Corsair's own site, the fans are nearly identical in terms of performance with the edge going to the stock ML120 fans as they have a slightly higher RPM and thus more static pressure (though in practice, it seems that the LL120 fans that I have run at the same 1600 RPM than the rated 1500 on the site). So I wouldn't call those fans an upgrade in anything other than RGB. In any case, for the 9900k at stock (in which I don't lose any gaming performance at 3440 x 1440 with ultra settings), temps stay at around 65-70C with the H100i RGB Platinum at 50% fan speed (much quieter than having 6 fans on the 360mm rad). Plus, I was able to return the LL140 fans that I had on top since I top mounted the H100i, so I saved quite a bit of money as well. Top mounting this 240mm rad also dropped my 2080 Ti by around 5C as well. In all, it was much more worthwhile for me to have returned the H150i Pro.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best brand of 2070 super"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

In general, the founders edition from Nvidia will have the best GPUs for better overclocking, but the more expensive AIB partner models will have better binned memory as well as the GPU die (though on average still slightly below the founders). Mostly though it comes down to the cooler for thermals and noise levels. The 2070 Super FE (founders edition) is pretty good for both, but some AIB partner models are almost inaudible over your system case fans. It really is just up to your preference on aesthetics and the cooler. You're only going to see a more significant performance difference in something like the EVGA 2080 Ti Black versus the FTW3 Ultra or obviously the K|NGP|N, but that is a massive price difference between these 2080 Ti cards than the difference between the 2070 Supers.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which AIO"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I've tested both extensively with the X72 and H150i Pro on my 9900k overclocked to 5.1GHz. The X72 performs the best and leaves you with extra headroom for pushing higher clocks if you can stand to run the fans louder. The H150i is limited due to the fan speed of the included fans. They max out at 1600 RPM which is still pretty quiet, but if you mount your H150i on top with a 2080 Ti dumping heat under it (like I did), you will eventually reach TJ max as it won't be able to keep it cooled. If you mount on front, it should be okay, but it'll still run a bit warmer than the X72. The X72 cools just as well as the H150i Pro at the same noise levels, but again, due to the better stock fans, it has more headroom to push further if you wish.

As for the software, I hate NZXT's CAM while I love Corsair's iCUE. Also, depending on your motherboard and if you fill all available DIMM slots, you may need to rotate the pump on the X72 or it will push up against your memory. That was my problem so I ended up with the Corsair H100i RGB Platinum instead. It is a 240mm AIO with really good included fans that spin up to 2400 RPM. It can easily keep my 9900k cooled at 5.1GHz when fans spin up to 80%, but it's pretty loud. At stock, I can keep the fans at 50% which is barely audible, and this is with the AIO mounted on top as exhaust with the 2080 Ti dumping heat into it. Hope this helps you out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H115i PRO at the top, intake or outtake?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

You'll never have a "dustless" case. Sure, if you have a dust filter up top as well, it will help reduce the amount of dust that your system will accumulate, but it will never be completely free of dust, and you should still try to clean it every few months (every six months at the least). You could go for positive pressure if you wanted, but it might make your case louder by creating extra turbulence. I wouldn't worry so much about slight negative pressure by having front intake, top exhaust, and rear exhaust. That should get you the best thermals as well as noise. If you end up getting a little extra dust as a result, just clean your system every few months. It really only takes like 10-15 minutes.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H115i PRO at the top, intake or outtake?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

It depends on the case. I've seen that video as well. Putting mine as exhaust over intake dropped my 2080 Ti by 5C on average.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2080TI Windforce vs Strix ?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

The Strix will OC better and run quieter. In general, the higher priced models are binned for better GPUs and memory. Also, the coolers are usually better. Based on reviews from guru3d and techpowerup (among several others from respected publications), the Strix model is quite good. Considering that you are getting something like a 2080 Ti, I would definitely step up and get the Strix model. The only Gigabyte model that is worth considering is their flagship Aorus Xtreme card but it is even more expensive than the Strix.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Lian Li PC-O11 Dynamic Vs Corsair Obsidian Series 500D RGB SE"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

While I love my case (500D RGB SE), when considering a custom loop, it does feel a bit limited. Unless you plan to mod the case, you'll likely only be able to mount the pump/res on the back of the 360mm rad attached to the front of the case (which must be a slim 30mm rad). Also, your video card would need to have the reference PCB or it will be too long and create clearance issues for the pump/res combo (unless you vertically mount the video card). I have the EVGA FTW3 Ultra 2080 Ti and if I want to do a custom loop, I need to get a 2 slot mounting bracket as well as the riser cable and water block.

For custom water cooling or even just using an AIO, the O11 Dynamic seems like a better choice. The only reason I didn't go for one is because I really like having hinged side panels that shut with magnets. Also, I'm really considering going with an air tower cooler if I can find a good one that doesn't mess with my RAM.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Case Recommendations"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the non i version of the H700 and while it's a sturdy case with good build quality, I don't think the air flow is quite as good as the H500M. I purchased this along with the X72 Kraken so that all available fan slots were filled, and for the most part, it was adequate for my build (9900k, 2080 Ti). The H500M might have better thermals if you really want to push overclocking, but the H700 was good enough. I eventually switched over to the Corsair 500D RGB SE for the RGB, but I still think the H700 is okay. The H710 refresh is now available and I would recommend that instead as it has a USB type C front panel as well as a single thumbscrew to remove the TG side panel (four thumbscrews is really annoying with the original H700).

Comment reply on mayatola's Completed Build: Homewrecker: A tale of too much RGB

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks so much :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with cablemod.com"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

The custom cables you get from cablemod aren't necessarily for cable management but more for aesthetics. I suppose they could help with cable management if you go for custom lengths so that you have fewer bunched up cables, but generally, they are more for how your system looks with colored, sleeved cables with cable combs. You can click my build to see how they look in a completed system, but the cable management part isn't really made much easier due to these cables.

By the way, these cables are very expensive. My custom cables cost me almost $200 with shipping. The cables you will need are two 8 pin PCIe (VGA), a 24 pin ATX for your motherboard, and at least one 8 pin EPS for your CPU (depends on your motherboard, you might have two 8 pin EPS connectors or an 8 and 4 pin EPS). Those are the most important for aesthetics as they will be the most visible. For your X62 cooler and 860 evo, you could get a SATA cable (it would need two connectors if you only want to run a single cable for both of them). I just used my stock PSU cables for my SATA devices. If you end up getting 5 cables with the pro sleeving and cable combs, you'll likely reach the same cost as me at around $177 before shipping.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM vs Noctua NF-A14 PWM??"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

If your case will fit them, 140mm are generally more efficient than 120mm fans. When it comes to static pressure for radiators, however, smaller fans are generally better at pushing air through radiator fins, but most good quality fans between 120 and 140mm should be fine. It's only when you get to sizes like 200mm where it's really obvious that larger fans struggle to push air through those fin stacks.

If your case has room for something like two 140mm fans or three 120mm fans, if you really need the air flow, I would always go for three 120mm fans. While the 140mm fans would be more efficient, a third fan would tip the favor back to the 120mm fans as you could run them at slower speeds (for quieter operation) and achieve the same thermals.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Push/Pull on AIOs"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

For temps, maybe they weren't using the most powerful CPU for the time. I think those tests are a couple of years old. Don't expect amazing temps with something like a 9900k. I have a 9900k and used the H115i, H150i, H100i RGB Platinum (my current cooler), and Kraken X72 coolers. I can safely say that the H115i Pro was the worst for me. If you do push/pull, I would still leave the fans that come with the AIO plugged into the included fan headers attached to the pump.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Push/Pull on AIOs"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are going to add more fans, it's probably best to hook them up to a fan hub or to the motherboard. Don't try to add more fans to the AIO unit itself. You need to download and install iCUE to control the fan and pump speed (I really like iCUE for this), and it probably won't recognize extra fans attached to the AIO.

Second question, those are the limits of those fans. Hint: they suck. The fans with the H115i RGB Platinum are much better as they spin up to 2000 RPM as you listed above. I have tried the H115i Pro with a push/pull fan config (the extra fans were Noctua Chromax 140mm fans) and the noise and temps (not to mention the cost of those extra fans) were terrible. Also, I didn't have control of the Noctua fans (I did set a curve) so that sucked too.

Your best bet is getting the RGB Platinum version and leaving it at that. Adding extra fans is only as good as the fans you buy and having the ability to control the fan speed in the OS. For the few different push/pulls that I have tried, it has at most ended up giving around 5C better temps under load. Not worth the money or hassle IMO.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H100i Platinum SE vs H115i vs Kraken X62"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah okay nice. For the fans to spin and light up, I think your system needs to be able to post, so you need the CPU in GPU installed.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H100i Platinum SE vs H115i vs Kraken X62"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, the different fan speeds are really annoying. I had to check several times to make sure I got the right cooler that would do the job for my system. Also, the black LL fans get up to around 1600 RPM but yeah, they are the slowest fans of everything listed.

The white version is fine but does kinda clash with the black case and pre-installed black LL120 fans. I do prefer the regular H100i RGB Platinum and honestly, it's kinda hard to notice the top exhaust fans anyway if you top mount the AIO (if you sit next to the case, you have to duck your head to notice them, unless you have the case raised higher than your keyboard on your desk). So replacing those fans for aesthetics is not very noticeable. The most noticeable fans are obviously the front and the rear exhaust. Hope that might help with your decision.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H100i Platinum SE vs H115i vs Kraken X62"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the same case and cooler (but the black one) as your part list and I would recommend you just keep the stock fans with them. They are excellent and perform better than the LL120 fans. For the H100i RGB Platinum, regardless of the white or black version, both come with fans that spin up to 2200-2400 RPM. The standard non white LL120 fans only go up to 1600 RPM (white ones spin up to 2200 RPM and the ML120 Pro RGB fans that come with the black version spin up to 2400 RPM). They can get a bit loud at that speed, but better to have that option if you need the cooling.

Anyway, to see how it all looks with the lighting (just default rainbows), you can click on my build. Good luck.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dual graphics card vs single"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

SLI and Crossfire are dead. Here's a good video that explains it, but you can find many more sources elsewhere: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_1OWdNDNLg

Your best bet for the single best video card is the 2080 Ti. The super is barely better than the standard 2080 and both are a decent bit behind the 2080 Ti. If you want the absolute best performance and decent headroom for enabling DXR (real time ray tracing effects), this is really the only card to get. DLSS is garbage (blurry and muddy visuals) so don't count on it to give you a significant performance boost. I've had mine for a while now and I'm very happy with it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2080 Super or TI?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, the 2080 Ti will always be better for everything. If you want the extra power to have headroom for things such as enabling real time ray tracing and maintaining high fps, you'll want the 2080 Ti (without turning on garbage like DLSS). If you want to save money, get the super. The super should be more than adequate for 99% of titles out there, but when you turn everything to max including DXR, expect a big drop to your fps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Low Price on the PNY RTX 2080"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Micro Center had it for lower at around $550 but they sold out. From what I heard (the guy who bought it), it runs fine and has a good cooler. Considering that the 2080 super is barely better, I'd say it's worth getting the PNY card.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which Water cooler should I get"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

I've tested both and the H150i is pretty bad IMO. It is very quiet, but the fans that come with the unit max out at around 1600 RPM. If you are overclocking, I'm not sure how much it can handle if you don't replace those stock fans. At least for a 9900k, it struggles to keep 5.0GHz cooled unless you front mount the AIO. I don't like front mounted coolers as most of the time, the tubes will be oriented on top which leaves a chance for air to get trapped in the loop. This has happened to me and there is a really annoying clicking sound. Sometimes you can work it out on your own, other times you have to RMA (I had to RMA mine).

The X72 is probably one of the best coolers I have tested (I have tried several thanks and sorry to Amazon) as it can keep even 5.1GHz on my 9900k cooled (when top mounted). I like top mounting the AIO because it practically eliminates the chance of air getting trapped in the loop, and it keeps the front intake open for the video card (in most cases, you will notice maybe a 5C difference from front mounting the AIO). Also, the fans that come with the unit are good static pressure fans and pretty quiet. The difference from the H150i is that the fans can spin up to 2200 RPM if needed to keep even the hottest CPU cooled.

The only reason why I don't use the X72 anymore (gave it to my brother) is because I'm not a huge fan of the NZXT CAM software. It has come a long way though and apparently improving. In any case, you want to install it to monitor your liquid temp and control fan/pump speeds (you can just set the silent or performance profile and call it a day but you still want to keep an eye on liquid temps - never let it hit 60C). I prefer Corsair's iCUE software as I have a bunch of other Corsair products that work together with it. For pure performance though, the X72 is much better and what I would recommend if I didn't already own a bunch of Corsair products.

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