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Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming i5, i7, i9?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming i5, i7, i9?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

The Fractal Design Define S is a nice case. Best of luck on your build. ~$240 on a gaming CPU makes far more sense for higher end gaming.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming i5, i7, i9?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

i9 is at a good price

What? $550 is TOO MUCH to spend on a gaming CPU.

but i know the i5 does pretty much the same thing.

Yes the 6 core i5 CPU will do an awesome job at gaming. Most games cannot use more than 4 CPU cores and some newer games work best on 6 cores and that seems to be the norm going forward. Now there is the odd game such as AotS and Universe Sandbox2 that can use more than 6 CPU cores but those games have awesome performance on 6 cores still. There is only a tiny difference from game performance on an OC i5 with an oc i7 or i9 (to same frequency) so the i5 8600k/9600k will do high refresh rate gaming (144+) and the higher CPUs are a waste of money.

Now higher core count CPUs have advantages when it comes to content creation and streaming tasks so the i7 and i9 will do better than the i5 in those tasks. Though price to performance the r7 2700x is a beast multicore performer where it can easily game at your 75hz display and have all the cores/threads for content creation for the dollar spent.

75hz is not a crazy high refresh rate so even locked intel CPUs and Ryzen CPUs can do that easily so you don't really need to buy the absolute top of the end CPU. Save your money and not spend over $500 on a CPU as that extra money would make a bigger impact on the GPU or other areas of the PC.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Must I put thermal paste on CPU before adding this AIO CPU - Cooler?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

I think I interpreted his question differently. I took it as "do I even need thermal paste for this AIO?" and the simple answer is Yes. It is the thermal conductor between the IHS on the CPU to the cooler itself. Granddy is correct that higher end coolers such as the x62 comes with decent thermal paste and you do not need to purchase separate paste. The temp differences between high end thermal pastes is really low, say ~1c difference and paying $15 for that is kind of a waste.

I got a Dark Rock Pro 3 cooler and I am using the thermal paste that came with it and my temps are great. If I were to drop my temps by 1c it would not matter because I already have a good 25c of extra thermal headroom (my comfort level ~80c on CPUs). https://imgur.com/a/0XIlddH

Thermal paste that comes with a decent cooler is nothing to scoff at. It works and works well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The Old Temperature Problem Of The Fx 6300"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

I am thinking about getting the FX 8370

Pro Tip: Do not invest any money in any components in a FX build that cannot be moved to a more modern build later. That means ddr3 ram, CPUs, am3 motherboards.

I could update the motherboard and CPU to a Ryzen 3 AM4 Build but still...

That will give you FAR more performance than the FX CPU due to how far they are behind. Though 65c isn't e terrible temp FX CPUs were more thermal temperamental compared to Ryzen or Intel CPUs. Any Ryzen and Intel CPU can run comfortable at 80c just fine where you don't have to worry about the heat burning out the CPU. At 100c it can shorten the life dramatically if that hot for extended amounts of time.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "External/portable options for a M.2 NVME,"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

For external options there are USB 3.0 sticks you can drop a M.2 in but you are limited by the USB 3.0 speeds which is about the same as SATA speeds. Thus NVMe through USB 3.0 is pointless a a cheaper SATA based M.2 would make sense with such a holder.

https://www.amazon.com/Aluminum-Type-C-Enclosure-Portable-External/dp/B0788HBLDZ/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1542803448&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=m.2+usb+3.0+enclosure&psc=1

Looking at the specs it states does not support NVMe which is the norm for those types of enclosures.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel optane or ssd?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Well I would highly recommend a SSD boot drive. For a second drive most people opt for a HDD for bulk storage. Now if you have a large steam library or a ton of games to install and want to have faster than HDD performance on average when you have a couple of options. Large capacity SSD that can hold the games you plan to install on it is one option. Another option is HDD+2nd SSD for StoreMI (amd) or HDD+Optane for Intel. Video explaining optane boosted game drive here: https://youtu.be/X5UrtwW-zJs

My sister's build uses a 256GB SSD for the boot drive and a 2TB HDD + 16gb optane stick for a steam drive. Basically any game she runs on the HDD first time startup (or fist time in a long while) will have HDD loading times but if she keeps playing that game it gets cached and boosted in speed for loading. Cached games can load as fast as if it was on a SSD.

It is the same principle as a seagate firecuda hybrid drive but unlike the firecuda the optane cache does not share the bandwidth with the SSD port the HDD is connected to and has lower latency. Not to mention firecuda drives only have 8GB cache and optane starts at 16gb and can go up from there.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will This Bequiet! Dark Rock 4 Fit?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Well let me show you what I mean by PCIe slot clearance from my own experience. This is from my build Ryzen Stealth.

I have an Asrock AB350M Pro4 motherboard and a Dark Rock Pro 3 cooler. The DRP3 is just as wide as the Dark Rock 4 and Dark Rock Pro 4 as the only difference the pro has is being a dual tower instead of single tower. If you look at my motherboard you will see the top PCIe slot is a tiny 1x slot often used for wifi cards and the 2nd slot down is the 16x slot for the video card. Then look at the pictures in my build and see just how close that cooler is to my video card. If the top slot was the GPU slot it would not have fit together.

Though I love my thermals with that cooler. I got my CPU OC to 4.0 GHz and I can't make my CPU hit 60c in temps. I cap out around 56c and its great, soo much thermal headroom I know it is still complete overkill for me even. If you are not OCing as chipset h370 won't allow it then the highest TDP chip you can add is 95w TDP. A 200w TDP cooler DR4 will be killing an ant with a bazooka overkill for your PC. https://imgur.com/a/0XIlddH

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Optane Memory as Cache?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

If you want to use Intel Optane to boost a non boot drive you NEED to have an 8th gen Intel platform or later to do so. Also it needs to be a b360 chipset or higher, the h310 will not support optane boost. Now depending on the files you dump on your HDD really depends if optane is even worth it. If you are dumping pictures/movies/documents/random stuff then there is zero reason to use optane. If you use a HDD for a steam drive and install a bunch of games on it then optane becomes a great option. This video will show what I mean for using optane to boost a game drive.

My sister on Her Build is using a 16gb optane module paired with a 2tb HDD for her steam folder so most of her games are installed on it. We chose that option as it was cheaper than buying a 1TB SSD and we re-used her old 256gb SSD from her old PC and that clearly wasn't large enough for her games. Just was a better option for price per GB while not having just HDD performance. In practice first time loading a game it is HDD slow but after that it gets faster and it really is in between a SSD and HDD.

This will not work on 7th gen Intel or before and certainly not on AMD at all. AMD has StoreMI (chipset limited still) but it is not nearly as good: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JVXpGbgBEI

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Radiator placement"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Push vs pull isn't really a difference (for average users)

This video basically backs that up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsh0IB-6ffc

You are talking about less than 0.5c difference from push and pull its small enough where it is not something to worry about. That is under the margin of error for most thermal testers.

This video will help if your liquid cooling is an AIO for your CPU only. It also compares GPUs with blowers vs open fans.

Another video about front mounted radiators: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCZ5iP5cu8g

If you are running a custom loop and both the CPU and GPU are on the same loop it really does not matter if its intake or exhaust. That is because those are by far the top 2 largest sources of heat in a PC and the loop will balance it out no matter the radiator placement.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will This Bequiet! Dark Rock 4 Fit?"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

As for PCIe slot clearance the top slot will be compromised by the cooler, luckily the top slot is a 1x slot and the 2nd slot is the 16x slot for the video card so it won't crowd out your video card. As for ram clearance the fan will go over the first ram slot but there is a couple things to note. The fan can be moved a tad higher so you can fit a low profile ram stick such as vengeance LPX sticks and alternately you can move the front fan to the other side for pull too. Because of that you should be able to use that cooler fine.

As far as cooling performance you got a non overclocking chipset (h370) a pure rock slim that's a far less powerful cooler (and cheaper) is more than ample cooling for any CPU that you can drop in that board. I doubt you would ever need to run the fan on that DR4 cooler above 40% so with an already quiet fan you will never hear it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best of budget AMD processors"

  • 17 months ago
  • 3 points

The older CPU has a higher clock speed at 4.2GHz and has 8 cores as compared to the Ryzen 4.

There is more to CPU speed than clock speed. There is a term known as IPC, Instructions Per Clock. That basically means how much work a CPU can do per clock cycle. Ryzen was a boost of 52% more IPC than the last gen FX CPUs so at the exact same clock speed the Ryzen will be about 52% faster. Sure you can OC a FX CPU to 5.0 GHz but you need a hella good cooler with that kind of wattage. Even so a stock speed r3 2200g will blow away a 5.0 GHz FX CPU in gaming performance because of the massive gap between IPC.

I had a FX 8320 OC to 4.7 GHz and both my R7 1800x AND my pentium G4600 was able to smash the FX CPU in game FPS despite the high OC on the FX chip. If you want to see a more detailed post about my experiences with said CPUs take a read here: https://us.battle.net/forums/en/wow/topic/20763186195

Comment reply on pipe's Completed Build: ITX Ryzen 2600X / GTX 1080

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice, gaming on 2nd gen ryzen seems to be better with using XFR instead of manually OCing because the one or 2 cores games rely on most (even if the game can use all 6 cores) often gets boosted higher than manually overclocking all cores to. Thus better game FPS. 65c also is really awesome. You got loads of thermal headroom to where you can change the fan profiles to slower speeds for lower noise...not that noctua coolers are loud to start with lol.

Glad to hear it's working out well for you. Game hard!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AMD; 7 1700x vs 5 2600x—rx 580"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

The second gen of Ryzen can on average net about 200mhz higher clocks so the second gen will game better. Though the first gen 8 core does have those 2 extra cores and that can help with streaming and video editing more.

If you want an example using my Ryzen Stealth build earlier today I had a family member ask me to show them my character in a rift that was shortly after I just hit max level (diablo 3) as I just started messing around with it. I hit 70 on normal difficulty so they wanted to see how I fared on expert without trying hard first. I haven't played d3 since season 3 and I remember a larger difficulty gap than there was lol. Don't expect me to be a pro at d3 lol.

https://youtu.be/TqodA11sd1o?t=402

I did list the stream as unlisted and don't mind the extra audio from facebook and when I clicked off on the 2nd screen d3 self mutes until I click back. That was using the program Action! with 1080p 60fps encoding and bitrate of 12mbps (finally got 15mbps upload). OBS will work fine too but I like the time shift feature in Action! for boss fights. My CPU is OC to 4.0 GHz and a 1700 by silicon lotto will hit 3.8 to 4.0 at 1.4v or lower. 4.0 is if you are lucky due to binning of the 1700. A 2600x will often OC to 4.1 to 4.2 GHz but have 2 less cores.

Using MSI afterburner to watch my FPS which doesn't show on my screen recording showed my FPS as high as 160 and my rare lows of 120 but more often around 140-ish in combat. If your goal is 60 fps in streaming as long as you get as good or better performance in game your streaming should look great. Diablo 3 is more single core CPU bound too so that FPS is actually really decent. As you can see with my setup I can stream very smoothly on a r7 1800x @ 4.0 GHz and a GTX 1070.

That RX 580 is within spitting distance of the GTX 1060 6gb card and that is a really good bang for the buck card for 1080p gaming at high settings. No issues whatsoever with the GPU choice. Hopefully you have decent internet upload speed as that will mostly dictate if you can stream at 1080-60fps or 720-30fps.

Think it’s worth going to a micro center? I’m about 4 hours away but for this kind of money it’s worth the drive.

Must consider cost of gas+wear and tear on car along with 8 hours of time driving there and back. With that much gas I would think it better to spend a bit more locally as the costs may be less in the end. Unless you got other deals there to make it cost less.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How to clean heat sink covered in sticky grease/dust?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Well considering you have the cooler out of the case giving it a good old fashioned washing in the sink should do the trick. I do that with my dust filters on my case (arc mini r2) as I can take them off and wash separately. Let them dry then put them back into place, good as new.

Though I am glad I don't smoke so I never have to clean tar out of my case.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i5 8600k or i7 8700k"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Just between those 2 CPUs it depends on your workload. If all you do is play games I would go with the i5-8600k because 99% of all games cannot use the extra hyperthreading in the i7 and the couple that can still will have awesome performance on a 6 core. Basically in those 99% of games that can't scale past 6 cores will have almost identical fps performance between both the i5 and i7 assuming the same clock speeds.

If you want to do live streaming or content creation, basically something that can flex the added threads the i7 has may be worth it then. Though the R7 2700x is a true multicore power beast in the consumer market for the price. The i9-9900k is just too costly atm.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8600k won't go over 4.7ghz"

  • 17 months ago
  • 3 points

https://siliconlottery.com/pages/statistics

8600K 4.80GHz 4.60GHz 1.375V 100% 8600K 4.90GHz 4.70GHz 1.387V Top 98% 8600K 5.00GHz 4.80GHz 1.400V Top 87% 8600K 5.10GHz 4.90GHz 1.412V Top 66% 8600K 5.20GHz 5.00GHz 1.425V Top 35% 8600K 5.30GHz 5.10GHz 1.437V Top 13%

When dealing with AVX workloads the bottom 2% of your CPU will cap out at 4.7GHz for an overclock. possible you lost the silicon lotto and that sucks.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Just a FYI you don't need to buy thermal paste as the cooler comes with it already. From mid tier thermal paste to high end the most you are going to see temp wise on a high end cooler is 1-2c and perhaps less on a lower end cooler like a stock cooler.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "be quiet! Shadow Rock TF2 clearance question"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

You should be able to fit that cooler in that case. Size wise that cooler should not extend past the motherboard itself and from other builds in that same case on this site it seems no radiator and just fans up top does not come low enough to go over the motherboard. Height wise that case can take 165mm coolers and this cooler is a 112mm cooler. Basically the intake fan for the cooler will have ample breathing room in your case. Though your cooler I don't think shipped with an AM4 bracket depending on how long ago yours was made but you may want to order one from bequiet directly if you don't.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2600 + 1070 ti OR 2700 + 1070?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

None of the mid range Ryzen or Intel CPUs will be a serious bottleneck to a GTX 1070 TI card. Keep in mind 99.99% of games out there can't fully utilize more than 6 cores (except for the odd few) so if gaming is your main workload then a r5-2600 or i5-k skew would be all you really want. I tend to bundle the r5-2600 with the i5-8400 as they perform very close to one another at stock speeds. Not exactly the same but close enough most people won't be able to tell in a blind test.

I would be more screaming bottleneck if someone was considering a pentium g5400 pairing with a GTX 1070 or the TI version as the CPU will be the bottleneck in games these days.

Well what the "bottleneck" is depends on game too. Something will always be the bottleneck limiting your FPS as if nothing was a bottleneck then you would have infinite FPS. Think of it like a chain, one part is always going to be weaker than the other links but as long as the chain is still strong enough for the load then that "weakest link" isn't a problem.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Difference between Overclock and Turbo boost?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Turbo boost is also per core rather than all core like an overclock. With an i7-8700k for example it will do 4.7GHz single core for turbo or 4.4GHz all core for turbo. Overclocked to 4.7 GHz is an overclock as all cores are boosted to that speed. As you said those turbos are temporary too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dedicated streaming PC"

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

If you can find a cheaper or comparably priced i3-8100 then do that, if not go with the 2200g.

Considering OP has an a320 chipset board already he is locked into Ryzen for his choices. Video editing and content creation in general tends to favor multiple cores so a 1700 or 2700 would be really good for it but I take that is out of OP's budget as he would also need a GPU too. A r3 2200g or r5 2400g would be great options but it is possible OP may need to update the bios on his motherboard. Now when doing game recording OBS can make use of the iGPU in a CPU to speed up its encoding ability but with Ryzen it might require to download a patch for it though I am not sure if it is built into the latest version. The r5 2400g would be the better option without a GPU as it is 4 core 8 threads and has the better igpu.

If OP can afford it though a r5 2600 (6c12t) would be the bomb for media creation on a budget and can be paired with a 1000 series GTX card or RX series AMD card. Either of those cards can easily do media encoding using the GPU as well and the extra cores in the CPU would be great with video editing. Though as stated before I think this option may be a bit expensive. Since OP has an a320 chipset board overclocking is out of the question so try considering the CPU stock speeds when looking at CPUs.

Might wait to check out black friday deals too and see what you can snag.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i7 cpu worth it?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Even for gaming an i5-8600k/9600k is going to be ample because 99.99% of games can't fully utilize the extra threads in the i7 over the i5. Well simulation games usually can such as universe sandbox2 and the odd game like Ashes of the singularity but those are really rare. Even then an i5 plays those games really well.

Not saying not to get an i7 I'm just saying the i5 will do an awesome job too with its 6 cores for gaming workloads. Other more core friendly workloads can have a better benefit from the i7 or i9 or even ryzen CPUs.

Comment reply on artilectic's Completed Build: Audio Production (& Gaming) Threadripper Machine

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Way to torment OCD people! Missing one of the rubber corner covers on the Noctua fan!lol

Though that cooler is a beast when it comes to cooling threadripper CPUs. TR4 would not be the first platform I would ever pick for gaming but if audio production was your main use then TR4 has a valid spot here. Though no reason you can't game on your work PC right?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help anticipating a bottleneck"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Bottlenecks do really depend on the game too. You know an i7-8700k OC to 5.3GHz will still bottleneck a GTX 1060 6gb in a game like World of Warcraft? It is because that game is really CPU bound especially in populated areas since all the drawcalls from the CPU have to be done on a single core. The more draw calls there are like say fighting a world boss with 50+ people at once will drop your FPS to 30 or lower because the CPU can't keep up. This results in the GPU taking a nap since it isn't getting the information fast enough from the CPU. Clear CPU bottleneck when you would not expect one. But it is the nature of the game engine and not fault of the hardware.

Other really GPU bound games will have a 2200g get the most out of a GTX 1080 ti where the GPU is the bottleneck. Though it is best to have a balance between the GPU and CPU for someone who likes to play a bunch of different games. Not very often do people only ever play one game but if they do there is nothing wrong of tailoring the PC build to their needs. The 2200g is a budget CPU but a good one and it does have 4 cores. The rx 580 is medium ranked for GPUs so it is not too far away from the CPU so it should make a good pairing.

The bottlenecker is the worst. It's garbage, don't use it...

I decided to try my system specs on that site for kicks and it gave me some really weird results. It recommended me for gaming to get 32GB of ram and even though I put in that I had 2 SSDs it is also recommending to buy another SSD. There is zero reason to get more than 16GB of ram for gaming as no current came uses the whole 16gb now. Some use 10-11gb including windows running but not 16 so 32 will be pointless. Also said my 1800x is bottlenecking my GPU by 10% which I know is BS. In games like doom 2016 and other more recent titles I can play them while keeping my GPU pegged at 100% and my CPU not hitting 100% on any of the cores. Simply meaning my GPU is not being bottlenecked by my CPU at all.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Zen 1st gen, still strong?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

The first gen Ryzen CPUs depending on silicon lotto clock to 3.7 to 4.1 GHz (3.9 to 4.0 for most) and perform decently well. I got an r7 1800x @ 4.0 GHz and it works well for me. Second gen Ryzen OCs to 4.0 to 4.3 ghz (4.1 to 4.2 for most) and has about the same IPC so clock for clock they are very similar. Second gen Ryzen I hear has a bit stronger memory controllers for being able to run more types of ram at their proper speeds than first gen as you almost want to try and get samsung b-die for first gen if you want 3200 to work right. Second gen Ryzen on a b450 or x470 boards also have XMP 2.0 which is a bit more aggressive self overclocking feature if you don't want to manually OC and from what I hear that alone can make it perform better in gaming than a manual OC.

So Ryzen 2 is better than first gen but the differences are not huge, say 300-400 mhz difference overall. I would not bother with first gen Ryzen unless the price difference is greater than the performance difference. So if it is more than 14% cheaper or more for similar models (1600 vs 2600, 1700 vs 2700) then it may be worth it for price to performance but you do get more with ryzen 2. A r5 2600 will perform very close with a i5-8400 and when OC to 4.2 it should do even better BUT you do need an aftermarket cooler for that kind of OC making it more expensive than the i5-8400 for higher single core performance. Though due to having multithreading the multicore speed at stock speeds does beat the i5-8400 hands down. 6c12t is better than 6c6t for multicore speed and that is how past i7 vs i5 comparison from 8th gen and previous worked.

Games just don't need a TON of cores so single core speed matters most though some games are just starting to be able to use 6 cores now while most already out use 4 or less cores. For this reason if the PC is just for pure gaming I would not recommend higher than a r5 or i5 CPU as they both have the 6 cores to satisfy gaming for years to come. The r7+i7 and now i9 CPUs I only recommend if you have a workload that can flex those extra cores/threads such as livestreaming or content creation.

Comment reply on zMadButcherz's Completed Build: CAD/GIS System

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah my cat loves to pose with my builds when I make them and she was the most proud with the black ice HTPC build as she got to mess with most of the stuff and even tried the case as a cat bed. My sisters build she had her bearded dragon sit on the case lol. Go ahead and see my completed builds if you like pet pics lol. Would be the Ryzen Stealth, Black Ice HTPC, and Sisters build.

Comment reply on zMadButcherz's Completed Build: CAD/GIS System

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

Bonus picture of the build supervisor is included.

I think that picture is missing...........

Comment reply on phlexplexico's Completed Build: Mini Mid-Range

  • 17 months ago
  • 3 points

The PSU position is basically the same as in the CM elite 130 case I built in. It is secure in the case because of the 4 screws that hold it into the back of the case which is the exact same support older cases had where the PSU is in the top. Though in a ITX case it can be handy because you can flip the PSU the other way and have the intake fan suck air out of the PC to boost airflow. I did that in my BlackIce HTPC and it works well. Don't have to worry about system heat overheating the PSU when its absolute max load is half the max the PSU can support.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help anticipating a bottleneck"

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

The 2200g is a decent budget CPU and the rx 580 is a great mid range card. No matter what game you play one piece of hardware will be the bottleneck limiting FPS and what is the bottleneck can change from game to game. Overall I think the RX 580 will work great with your 2200g with gaming. If you were running a FX-4300 for a CPU then I would really be nagging for an upgrade but luckily what you have now is actually decent.

Comment reply on DireThunder's Completed Build: First build

  • 17 months ago
  • 3 points

Asus is generally a decent brand but I don't like the VRMs on that board but only because I like overclocking lol. 4+2 VRMs and absolutely no heatsink on them either. Though a r5 2600 could just be left on XFR 2.0 and not bother overclocking in this build to run well in gaming.

Though a r5 2600+gtx 1060 6gb card is an awesome pairing with 1080p 60hz gaming and should be able to play any game currently out very well at that resolution/refresh rate. Looks like OP left the plastic film on the side panel for the pictures! Though I would love to see how cable management was tacked in this build with some nice inside pictures.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Possible bottleneck?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

well it seems a bit harder to use because of having to dig for all the info it needs but I was able to bump my ram speeds to 2800 from 2666.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Possible bottleneck?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Ohh I just found this fun utility on finding ram speed setup on ryzen CPUs: https://www.techpowerup.com/download/ryzen-dram-calculator/

I am going to give it a try myself and see how well it works for me, I will post back with the results.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Possible bottleneck?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Try setting it to 2666 for the ram. It rebooting a few times is the PC trying to start up with 2933 but not being successful. I get the same issue on my build when I try 2933 and I went as far as manually changing specific settings to try to make it work.

Alright after looking at your build I see you are just running the AMD stock cooler which can handle a minor overclock but that is about it. You still might be able to do a 3.5GHz all core OC though on stock. That case though can fit a number of coolers in it so if you wanted to get an aftermarket cooler for a higher OC you can but keep in mind you may only gain as little as 200 mhz if you lost the silicon lotto.

I'm not too sure what "game boost" is meant to do in the bios but it is not needed to access what you need to in order to get the PC running optimally. After doing a search it seems game boost is meant to be an auto overclocking tool but I never liked using those anyways as they tend to go higher than you need for voltages. If you want to OC and run the lowest possible voltages for that OC then set the multiplier to 35 for 3.5 GHz and start at like 1.2v and see if it is stable. Stable meaning running AIDA64 stress test for a long period of time (recommend hours stable). If it is stable right off the bat drop voltages by 0.01v and try again but if not stable and you get a crash increase the voltage by 0.01v. I would be wary of exceeding 1.32v though on the stock cooler. If temps goes above 80c or the PC crashes then you need to tone it down. If you find the clock speed stable and still have lots of headroom then try 3.6 GHz and start from the voltage you were stable at with 3.5GHz.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Possible bottleneck?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Alright after looking at the updated benchmarks a few things to note. One the CPU boost clock is going to 3.35GHz which is higher than the 3.2 GHz base clock so that is definitely an improvement. If you have the thermal headroom you might be able to OC it depending on silicon lotto from 3.7 to 4.0 GHz like most people do on that CPU. So basically the better benches are because most people OC that CPU.

Your graphics card score improved a LOT and I believe that is due to the CPU no longer holding back the card which it would at 1.35GHz.

Also the ram speed is at 2133 base speed now and it is a 3000 kit. You might be able to easily enable the XMP profile in the bios and select 2933 MHz. Though the memory controllers in first gen ryzen isn't the strongest so anything other than samsung b-die ram might have issues running at advertised speeds so you may get stuck at 2666 which isn't terrible. I got a 2x8GB 3000MHz kit of corsair vengeance LPX ram and a r7 1800x CPU and I could only get it stable at 2666 MHz. That is my Ryzen Stealth build. Also all the issues you had when resetting the bios again shows that there definitely was something wrong going on.

Few things I would like to know, what case, CPU cooler, and motherboard do you have in your build?

Comment reply on Fr0st_Byte's Completed Build: Budget Office Work PC

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

Did the same thing I would have done and use the space under the optical drive to stuff the extra cables after tying them up into a nice bundle. Not a fan of building in cases that have zero cable management ability unless absolutely necessary. Even the ITX case of the CM elite 130 has more cable management options with tie down points and a bar you can tie up extra cables too.

Though nice selection of parts for a work PC. Solid 4 core CPU, budget motherboard, ample ram, a SSD, and a solid name brand budget PSU. Don't need a GPU for MS office and even though the integrated graphics scales much better with dual channel ram I get the feeling that simply won't be needed with the workloads this PC was made for.

Comment reply on williamshatnerspants's Completed Build: First Gaming PC for Bathan

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Interesting. EVGA does not make you look in the manual to find out which slots you need to put your ram in when only using 2 sticks. They leave a sticker over the ram slots to tell you. And the MSI - B360M PRO-VD board I last got didn't even have a manual in the box or any kind of setup info such as front headers too and I had to get that online.

Comment reply on Raptor24's Completed Build: First Build

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

I was also wondering about that choice too. A i5-8400 plus a b360 motherboard does make sense to pair together but the H100i looks out of place to me. Though some people do like the aesthetics of having an AIO and are willing to spend that much for looks. Stock cooler will keep that CPU within its safe temps and allow full boost clocks.

I can't judge too much though as when helping my sister with her build we also got an aftermarket cooler for her CPU (the same one) because we didn't want to be staring at the stock cooler all the time lol. The Pure Rock Slim is a nice looking cooler and super silent too, CPU cant even hit 60c on it which is great.

This build does look awesome but my only real nit pick is in the pic I see 4 ram sticks installed and I see only 2x8GB in the part list. Is that 2 kits of 2x8 for 32gb or 4x4GB sticks for 16gb? I suppose it can be translated either way from what we see.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Possible bottleneck?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/11778830

Seems something is way off with your CPU according to that benchmark. Your CPU score is WAYYY below average for that CPU. It shows your turbo clocks at 1.35 GHz which is way below stock clock. You might want to try resetting your bios to defaults and wiping out any OC (in this case underclock) settings on your CPU and try stock settings. Your CPU should be able to perform way better than that. Also check CPU tems using AIDA64 to see if you are thermal throttling as that could be an issue too if you are having problems with your CPU cooler. Once you have AIDA64 downloaded and installed click tools at the top and select system stability test. Once that is up make sure only CPU/FPU/Cache is checked and hit start at the bottom. If CPU temps go over 100c it can thermal throttle and I would prefer to see them 80c or lower. On CPU usage if a red line shows up it will show you how much you are throttling if it is. This is what throtteling looks like in AIDA64.

When working normally there should be nothing wrong with using a 1070 TI with a r5 1600 CPU.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1700, 1700x, 1800x, Are they basically the same when overclocked?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Well I rather it cap out at 4.0 GHz now and have decent IPC then what the FX line had being an awesome overclocker but being made useless by abysmal IPC.

I do use a r7 1800x now which I got in april 2017 and I got mine to 4.0 GHz @ 1.381v. I could not get it any higher but I also refused to go above 1.4v too. Ryzen is also far less power hungry than the old FX CPUs so even with it running at 4.0 GHz I get really awesome temps. Though I am running a DRP3 cooler.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cooling help!"

  • 17 months ago
  • 0 points

Many decent tower coolers match if not beat 120mm AIO coolers such as the Cryorig H7. It has to deal with thermal dynamics as you still have to transfer the heat from the CPU to the air to get it out of the PC. Radiators only have so much surface area and that surface area is half the size on a 120mm rad compared to a 240mm rad. Thus a 120 is far less efficient at dumping heat to the air compared to a 240mm rad. The same thing happens with heat sinks where heat is transferred to the fins by ways of heat pipes and the fins transfer the heat to the air.

Coolers like the Dark Rock Pro 4 and Noctua NH-D15 are powerful enough to match and beat some 240mm AIO coolers but smaller tower coolers also beat 120mm AIOs. I am a bit partial to Be Quiet coolers due to my experience with them.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1700, 1700x, 1800x, Are they basically the same when overclocked?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 4 points

https://siliconlottery.com/pages/statistics

That basically backs that up.

  • 1700 3.70GHz 1.344V 100%
  • 1700 3.80GHz 1.376V Top 94%
  • 1700 3.90GHz 1.408V Top 65%
  • 1700 4.00GHz 1.440V Top 24%

  • 1700X 3.80GHz 1.360V 100%

  • 1700X 3.90GHz 1.392V Top 72%
  • 1700X 4.00GHz 1.424V Top 33%

  • 1800X 3.80GHz 1.344V 100%

  • 1800X 3.90GHz 1.376V Top 98%
  • 1800X 4.00GHz 1.408V Top 69%
  • 1800X 4.10GHz 1.440V Top 18%

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking To Upgrade"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

$600 for a GTX 1080 ti isnt too bad for a regular one, hybrid one would likely be better as those version do cost more with the cost of a better cooler. Have fun fitting that in an ITX case though, might have to get creative on how you mount it. Also check GPU length with case GPU supported length.

A G-sync panel will be awesome in the event your FPS drops below 144hz as the display will adapt its refresh rate to the output of your GPU which will really smooth out your gameplay.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking To Upgrade"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

most games only really scale with 4 CPU cores. Only newer triple A titles are just starting to scale with 6 cores but do still play very well on 4 cores as game developers know that is what the average PC user is on atm (According to steam statistics). Though if you buy the video card now and find you still want to upgrade the rest later on you still have that option and move said card to the new build. Doesn't hurt to get the card now and see how it performs with the cpu you have now.

As for PSU a 620w is enough power and seasonic makes some good PSUs. Bronze rating is not a quality rating, its an efficiency rating and doesn't mean as much for a home user compared to gold on your power bill. Just keep your old video card so when it comes time to build yourself a new PC entirely you can re-use your old hardware and make yourself an HTPC or even have a fully working PC to sell/give to family or friend.

Comment reply on Wyclef00469's Completed Build: Decent HTPC for around $400 that's upgradable.

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah and cases like the Node 202 that will be shorter like the case you have are more expensive especially since it needs a SFX PSU instead of a standard ATX one and has no option for an optical drive. The silverstone one is a nice in between. Though if I am not mistaken you could fit a card in there as high as a GTX 1050 ti for a low profile card. Your 450w PSU will also have more than enough power for it too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking To Upgrade"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

If you can fit a 1080 to or one of the new RTX cards into your current build I am sure you can still get more life out of your haswell CPU yet. Especially since you can overclock your current i5. Might also be a better idea to do it that way since Intel CPU prices are dumb at the moment.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget RTX build"

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

I agree a larger SSD will be a much better quality of life change in his build. 480gb will hold windows plus a number of games and HDDs can be added later on. A 120gb will hold windows and perhaps 1 or 2 small games, Large triple A title? likely will either fully fill up the 120 with windows or not fit. Some games can be 70gb+ in size.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Exhaust CFM vs Radiator CFM"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

That is right, in order to push air through the radiator. If these are AIOs you are getting they often come with pressure style fans out of the box. Custom loop however you have a million options for pressure fans from regular cheap ones like the ones I listed to RGB to noctua fans even. That is why I wanted to give a tip on how to tell the fans apart as the airflow or pressure is mostly in how the fan blades are designed.

Comment reply on r98farmer's Completed Build: MI-6 8700k GTX 1070

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

Super tiny build! Also I currently have that exact version of video card too, the cooler on it is actually better than first expected for being a single fan card.

Comment reply on Wyclef00469's Completed Build: Decent HTPC for around $400 that's upgradable.

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

When I rebuilt my HTPC in the summer of 2017 I was actually considering this same case. Though 2 things made me choose the CM elite 130 instead as it was almost half the price and could support full height video cards for future upgrading which I then took advantage of this year. Though I do use that PC for gaming too so the video card option was a bit more important.

I'm not sure what all the uses you do with your HTPC but if all you do is internet and media playback you won't even need to add a video card at all. The igpu in the Ryzen 2200g is almost as good as a GT 1030 video card so it can still run some games just fine. It is FAR better than intel integrated graphics by far.

Though looks like your entertainment station does not have the height to accommodate the elite 130 like mine is so the silverstone case does seem to be the better fit. I do like how the motherboard you selected has 4 ram slots so its not as much of a pain to go with 2x4GB ram now as you still have 2 slots open for future upgrading. Hope this HTPC serves you well.

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