add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "High air flow"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

I am sorry but this question seems a bit vague. Are you referring to case fans as some are air flow design and others static pressure design or somewhere in between? Or referring to which cases might offer high airflow for better cooling?

For fans it is basically the wider the fan fins the more static pressure it may possibly have. There is some variation in that but that will give you a general idea.

For cases look up gamers nexus on youtube and see if they have reviewed that case. If they have they usually show how effective a case can be with its cooling potential.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Noctua nh d15 se amf overkill for ryzen 2700x?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Well an 850w PSU is overkill as well you might save some money going with the 650w version of that PSU and save over $45. Even if you try and max out the OC on both the CPU and GPU I doubt you will be able to max out a 650w PSU.

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/y88H99/evga-supernova-g3-650w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-220-g3-0650

I don't see anything that stands out to be bad in that build to really criticise. I just hope you got a good monitor to attach this PC to like a 1440p high refresh or a 4k, the former most recommended for gaming. CPU and GPU makes a good pairing, ram is standard, decent motherboard, nice case, plenty of SSD storage for several games.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Noctua nh d15 se amf overkill for ryzen 2700x?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

For minor overclocking I can see that cooler being overkill as it is a really good cooler. I would not find it hard to imagine a 4.2 OC depending on silicon lotto. I would say either the NH-D15 or the DRP4 cooler is a solid choice for high end air cooling.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Discontinued radiator"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

How about the ones from EKWB? They got 360mm radiators with different thicknesses depending on how much room you have.

Of course the thicker the radiator the lower density the fins are due to how that can restrict airflow. They are 90% copper tubing and brass chambers and the only aluminium is just the housing so no contact to the water for that.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Does this parts match the pc that i wanna build."

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

One suggestion I would have is to change the HDD to a 7200RPM drive. The 240GB ssd is usually only large enough for windows and a game or 2 but most of people's less played games often go on the HDD and as slow as they are a 5400RPM is much more painful in slow speeds.

Can use a drive such as: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/dWkD4D/hitachi-internal-hard-drive-hus724040ale640

Another idea is if you plan on installing a bunch of games on the HDD is to boost it with optane. This video from LTT explains it well enough. A link for a 16gb optane drive is here: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/YNmxFT/intel-optane-memory-module-16-gb-pcie-m2-80mm-mempek1w016gaxt

Basically the cost of a HDD + 16GB optane will give a decent speed game drive with the capacity of the HDD. When you get to the larger capacities over 1TB (like 4TB that you planned) is a nice compromise on price to performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which temperature sensor is more important or accurate for determining CPU temp?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

So you are pushing the CPU past 5.0 GHz so yeah it will be harder to cool. Also a 360mm AIO is a good choice for that kind of CPU. When the radiator is at the front as intake the radiator gets all the cool air intake to cool the CPU but it has the after effect of the CPU heat going into the case which in turn makes the GPU run hotter. Having the radiator at the top and exhausting means all the air going through the radiator is coming from inside the case which the GPU dumps its heat into however GPU temps are unaffected by CPU heat.

Seems you are using an auto overclocking tool to OC your CPU and those tools tends to use more voltage than what you need sometimes. Chances are though you will not notice a difference in game performance with only a slight change on the CPU clocks of 100-200mhz. Try going into the BIOS and running an all core OC to 5.1GHz at 1.3v. If that runs perfectly stable after a long test on AIDA64 and temps are under 90c then go back in and drop the voltage again by a tiny bit. Repeat that process until you find the lowest stable voltage you can run at 5.1ghz on. If it does run stable on 1.3v or lower the CPU should generate less heat than it is now and would be easier to cool. If 5.1 is not stable on 1.3v then try it again at 5.0ghz but I have a feeling 5.1 should be easily doable. This is if you absolutely want to stay under 80c on load.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which temperature sensor is more important or accurate for determining CPU temp?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

I would download the trial version of AIDA64 and do the stability test and stress test your CPU. It will run it at full power and show temps as well. It can also show if you are experiencing any throttling at all. I would recommend the CPU to only max out in the low 80s at max on 100% sustained loads for logativity of said CPU. MSI afterburner CPU temps is the one I would more or less trust and I am going to guess the other one may be a motherboard censor and not the one built into the CPU checking the temps.

I know you are running an i9-9900k but I am not sure what cooler you have or what your overclock is at (ghz and voltage). Also I am not sure what case you have and where you have the radiator in said case.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What I would buy for a LAN party"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Haribo - Gummi Bears 3lb Bag 4-Pack Food

If you wanted to be evil get the sugar free version. Check Amazon reviews here to see why

Doritos - Tortilla Chips, Cool Ranch Food

One of the most destructive snacks to keyboards/mice. Though some people use the lifehack of chopsticks to keep the flavour powder off your hands so it doesn't clog your devices.

I don't usually snack while I game but I do like brewing a pot of tea (looseleaf) and having that at my side. It's nice as the tea I get doesn't have an insane amount of caffeine and as I don't add sugar there is no risk of getting the sugar crash later on.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can i use Freesync?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

It was a night and day difference for me in fast paced games like doom 2016 when I had freesync enabled. All you need is a displayport cable so for about 10 bucks you can start using freesync. I would recommend it still.

As for how smooth things appear to you when you are in a game doing over 75 fps it will not make a difference. Using the fast vsync option will allow the video card to push the most recently completed full frame to the display every frame the display shows to prevent screen tearing. When you have a dip below 75 fps is when it gets complicated. Either the image may stutter when it skips displaying a frame or you may still end up with tearing. Adaptive sync allows the display to adjust its own refresh rate to match the fps output of your video card if it ever drops below its max fps.

My screen is 144hz and with Doom 2016 my FPS varies depending on what is going on and where I am in game from 120-160 fps. Other games like MMORPGs can have dips below 60 fps due to how the game engine works. Also some other games lock at 60 fps like tales of berseria (awesome storyline btw) so it may not line up great with 75hz for smooth gameplay without freesync. If you like anime at all I would recommend keeping an eye on Berseria on steam for when it goes on sale, quite often when it does go on sale it's like 75% off or more.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1650 Release"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

unless You need a slot power only card.

I think that is the ONLY use case for this GPU where you have a store bought 2nd to 4th gen intel PC that uses a proprietary PSU and can't deliver enough power to run a 6 pin power connector. I can't see that being a huge market so I can't see that being enough to justify this card. Most of them can still support a rx 570.

For HTPC gaming PCs cases like the Node 202 and other tiny cases can support a RX 580 easily and a 450-500w PSU can power it too. So in the tiny case battle to support a GPU as well then I still cannot justify a GTX 1650. Of course before they stated the new cards all would have the benefits of encoding with Turing but the 1650 just has the old volta encoder so what is the point of this card? It doesn't have any features that make this card stand out past the rx 570. Well sure it can use G-Sync but if you are buying budget a gsync screen is out and chances are you are getting freesync anyways if you get adaptive sync at all.

With the disappointment of this card I wonder what will happen if they make a TI version of this card.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can i use Freesync?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

nVidia video cards that are the gtx 1000 series or later was updated to allow them to use freesync. nVidia only supports adaptive sync over displayport so no HDMI. You also should be running the latest drivers but since that card came out after the freesync update that should be fine. All that is left is to enable G-Sync in your nVidia control panel.

I use an older GTX 1070 with an AOC - G2590FX 24.5 and it works great for me. Sure that display is marketed g sync compatible freesync but all freesync is supported if you have a recent enough video card and drivers over displayport.

I did check the manual for that monitor and you need to enable freesync in the monitor settings (page 17/18 in manual). The freesync range for how much it can adjust its own refresh rate seems to be 40fps to 75fps from what I can see in the manual so that is actually decent for a range. I have seen a number of 75hz freesync displays that only have a range of 60-75. Basically having a lower limit on the range helps when you get FPS drops in a game. That can happen no matter how good your hardware is due to how some game engines work and how well or poorly optimized games are.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which temperature sensor is more important or accurate for determining CPU temp?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

and the liquid temp in CAM showed as 51C

That may be the temperature of the water in your liquid cooler by the sounds of it. I would never expect the liquid to be the same temperature as the CPU itself. Basically what happens is the CPU makes the heat while the CPU waterblock transfers that heat to the water. As the water goes through the loop the radiator transfers the heat to the air to cool the water. Due to the thermal capacity of water it does not change its temps very fast so each pass it takes through either the radiator or the CPU block only changes its temps a small amount at a time. It would be expected for the water to be somewhere in between ambient temps and CPU temps. If the water had the same temp as the CPU then the radiator is not working at all.

It is because of this when testing any type of liquid cooler you need to give it at least 30+ minutes of testing before measuring the temps to see how effective that cooler is. Air coolers tends to max out faster as they get heat saturated quicker compared to water due to how much heat per volume it can hold and also the differences in volume of what is holding said heat.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dark Rock Pro 3 Fans"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Either way the DRP3 and the newer DRP4 is a damn good air cooler! I can say since owing mine since early 2017 I am very pleased with my purchase.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dark Rock Pro 3 Fans"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

I got the Dark Rock Pro 3 myself and I have a hard time making my CPU even hit 60c. That is from my Ryzen Stealth Build. With an r7 1800x @ 4.0 with 1.381v this is the cooling power the DRP3 has: https://imgur.com/a/EGednc4

You would almost swear my looking at those temps that it is under a liquid cooler but that is fully on air. Ambient temps was at 20c at the time of that test. Though the DRP3 cannot outperform a 360mm or larger AIO as it will have even more surface area in the radiator to dissipate heat into the air but if you are aiming for that kind of cooler I would wonder what you are actually trying to cool. Perhaps an i9-9900k @ 5.3GHz or overclocking a threadripper as far as it can go?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dark Rock Pro 3 Fans"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Both fans are different sizes, one is a 120mm fan and the other is a 135mm fan.

  • SilentWings BQT T12025-MF-PWM
  • SilentWings BQ SIW3-13525-Mf-PWM

If you were going to run a 240mm AIO I would just stick with the DRP3 as it can beat out some 240mm AIO coolers in both noise and performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "r5 2600 @3.9ghz with rtx 2060 getting 2785 in cinebench r20"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah a single intake fan as the only airflow is low. I would recommend a minimum of 1 in and 1 out and more doesn't hurt. You do get diminishing returns with more but it can be helpful. A new cooler would be nice especially if you want to hit 4.0-4.2GHz. Though there are many factors that contribute to how good or bad cooling in a PC is.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "r5 2600 @3.9ghz with rtx 2060 getting 2785 in cinebench r20"

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

Chances are the CPU may not be reaching max boost if it is getting that close to thermal max. How is the airflow in the case?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How well will this work?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

120mm AIOs are generally not worth it because many mid range air coolers beats them in performance for less cost. If you plan to go AIO I would recommend a minimal of a 240mm radiator. The radiator is the only part that gets the heat out of the water and into the air preventing a thermal run off and overheat. The more surface area of a radiator you have the more potential to get heat transferred to the air. Many single tower air coolers would have about the same surface area to accomplish the same task and have similar cooling. Dual towers like the Noctua NH-D15 or Dark Rock Pro 4 can actually out perform some of the 240mm AIO coolers too but take up a ton of room. Sizes on the Cryorig H7 or Be Quiet Pure rock are much less of an issue and would recommend over a 120mm AIO. The Dark Rock 4 is about the same price but I can see that cooling much better than a 120mm AIO.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "When is ryzen 3rd gen coming out and is it worth the wait?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

As I have always said, figure out of your upgrade is a NEED or a WANT. If it is a want then it is best to wait, the longer you wait the more value you get out of your old hardware too! I agree with that sentiment as well.

In your case if you got that haswell CPU in 2013 then you so far got 6 years of value out of that CPU which is actually really good when you look at it that way. You spent good money on it in 2013 so you are making good use of your money you already spent!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rate My Build"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

That Cryorig H7 for $110 is way overpriced. The Pure Rock cooler from Be Quiet is about even with the H7 on cooling potential and at a much lower noise and it is a much more respectable $35 USD instead of $110 USD. Though if OP wants to push the OC more with a stronger cooler the Dark Rock 4 is a beast,

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/C7mLrH,cwPzK8,93Crxr,FRYLrH/

Also if no overclocking at all and just at stock speeds stock cooler is enough to save some cash.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Desk PC"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Well a desk PC certainly can be made with the room to hold multiple PCs at once. Having your gaming rig and server in the same desk is a great idea. You could also get an AB switch to change your monitor/keyboard/mouse over between the 2 at a push of a button depending on how often you go back and forth. Would greatly cut down cable clutter for your cable management.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Desk PC"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Well as to which PC you build in said desk I would very highly recommend you build it around how it is going to be used. I have seen a few different types of desk PCs before and they usually follow a couple of basic principles. They either showcase all the glorious hardware you have or try to hide the PC as much as possible. I take you plan on doing the former or else what the hardware looks inside would be irrelevant.

If all you do is Game, possibly livestream, some non business content creation then an Intel i7-8700k/i9-9900k or an AMD r7 2700x would be great. Also depending on how long it takes for this desk to be built the next gen of Ryzen may be out too. Threadripper and Intel equivalent would be a complete waste for that kind of use and I would only recommend if you have some sort of workflow that can actually scale with that many cores. It would perform worse in gaming compared to the other options and just cost a lot more. Most people's idea of multitasking is having web browsers up, playing music, and have voice chat going and to be frank a 6 or 8 core CPU that is recommended for gaming today can also handle that "multitasking" without even breaking a sweat.

Also if you plan to make it look as awesome as possible hard tubing custom loop liquid cooling would be nice though it is expensive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Coolermaster HAF XM - discontinued case compatible with modern AIO water coolers?"

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

If I wasn't mistaken you could fit an AIO rad at the top of the case and I do not see how it will suddenly become "incompatible" with AIOs. Unlike software with windows versions AIO compatibility is with the spacing of the screws that hold the radiator to the case and they are spaced to match the fans. There has been no rumours of the fan industry being turned upside down overnight with 120mm fans disappearing and I honestly can't see that happening in the foreseeable future either.

I see lots of builds that use the 240mm AIO types so that should work fine. 200mm radiator AIOs are not something I really ever hear about and even if they did exist I would not expect it to be any more than a very niche market in the PC world. The other idea is to go air cooling and a cooler like the Noctua NH-D15 or the Be Quiet Dark Rock Pro 4 can outperform many of the 240mm AIO coolers on the market. Best of all they have far less moving parts than an AIO so less noise and less things to possibly break down. Only downfall is that they take a lot of room but you have said room in a case that big.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "When is the new Intel Processor Launching and is it worth waiting? (Subjective)"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Remember the tic-toc-tic-toc release plan Intel stated years ago? lol. Seems it has been Tick-Toc-Toc-Toc so far with nothing new on the architecture since skylake. Slightly more clock speed and more cores is the only change in that time.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st time building a pc and had a question"

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

The TL:DR version:

Motherboard has both a M.2 slot and sata ports for drives. If you use M.2 then one sata port goes dead. Basically the M.2 takes the place of the sata port when in use.

This is a non-issue for most people as most people usually either do a single ssd or ssd+hdd setup and most ports go unused to begin with. Some really low end motherboards may have 4-6 ports and higher boards can have more but if you are only going to have 1-2 drives installed it is not something to worry about.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Anyone Know Where to get an atx ddr3 motherboard from"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

To add one huge warning on this:

Stay away from AMD FM2(+) and AM3 platforms. The old bulldozer architect is too far behind and not worth any amount invested in it. Well if you can get it free then why not but dont put any money into it.

Going with the Haswell Intels and corresponding motherboards like DrLitch suggested you can net some decent performance assuming you find decent deals on used hardware.

I have an i5 and I can’t afford but 8gb of ram so I figured it might be just as fast as the new one with half the gbs

If you already have a more recent i5 that uses DDR4 then just use that, Get a single stick of 8GB of ram so you keep another slot empty to add 8GB more later on when you can afford it. Which i5 do you have? All the 6th gen through 9th gen takes DDR4.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New AIO soon. Not sure on airflow. 240mm exhaust front vs 120mm exhaust rear? Or other?"

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm worried about using the 240mm AIO for intake as I don't want to heat up the other components and I would only have my single bottom 120 pusing cold air

Just to add onto this- There will be enough airflow for the rest of the PC with 3 fans intake (2 front aio, 1 bottom) where the heat that the CPU makes will make very little difference for the rest of the PC. Sure if you have non pressure fans and the radiator is the only intake you might have issues as not enough air will even be going through the radiator but the fans that come with most AIOs is more than ample for the job AND you have an extra 120mm at the bottom. At worst you may be looking at a 1-2c difference in GPU temps by having it as a front intake instead of exhaust. Luckily the R5 1600 is not a super hot CPU and the "heat" going into the case is not going to be extreme.

Also a 240mm AIO can disperse far more heat from the fluid in an AIO than a 120mm. It all equates to thermal dynamics of more radiator surface area to transfer the heat to the air as that is the only real source of heat leaving the loop. 120mm AIOs are kinda garbage as many cheaper mid range air coolers outperform them giving better price to performance and quieter operation.

My case airflow is setup in a way to be very efficient though I chose an air cooler over an AIO due to personal preference. I got 5 case fans, 2x 120mm front intake, 1x120mm bottom intake, 1x120mm back exhaust, 1x140mm top exhaust. Just as Mark stated to be the norm is front+bottom intakes and top+back exhaust. That setup has worked really well for me on both CPU and GPU temps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "cpu graphics"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Well the iGPU in Intel CPUs are not for gaming. They add a video out so when someone is building a PC for non gaming use it helps save them some money where they don't have to buy a discrete GPU. Intel HD graphics is ample power for word processing, watching videos, internet usage, etc. The AMD APUs 2200g and 2400g were designed with the super budget gamer in mind so it can play a number of games albeit lower settings and/or resolutions and makes a great temporary hold out before getting an actual GPU.

When you have a seperate GPU some people may also find some use for the iGPU such as some productivity programs able to be boosted by Intel Quick Sync and other programs like OBS can use the iGPU to live encode your livestream to help alleviate processing load off the rest of your PC. It will be a very long time before igpus from either Intel or AMD competes with a GTX 1060. Right now the igpu in the 2400g only really competes with a GT 1030 at best and I strongly doubt they will try a hard push for a high end GPU being integrated for a couple of reasons. One I can see the die space taking too much room, memory bandwidth bottlenecks going to ddr4 ram as dedicated vram in GPUs is much better for that task, and even if they can do it they will cannibalize their own low end GPU market.

Comment reply on BullDogRed1's Completed Build: AMD Travel PC Mini ITX

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

It seems that the LP Noctua coolers are a staple on most super small ITX builds lol. Well the NH-L9 cooler is an awesome LP cooler! Have you tried to OC the iGPU yet? The case model is MX500? Crucial has MX500 SSDs, what a coincidence lol.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrading CPU i5-9400F vs Ryzen 5 2600"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

a B450 chipset board will support ram higher than 2666 and Ryzen does scale some with ram speed. Intel does not scale as much as AMD but the current locked intel chipsets supports 2666. If you put in a 3000 kit on said Intel board it will run at 2666 but it will still run fine. That is important info because ram prices fluctuate and sometimes you may find higher speed ram cheaper than the lower speed (comparing 3000 to 2666). Usually 3200 will cost more than 2666 99.9% of the time.

Both the AMD and Intel systems you listed should perform very close to each other in performance. Close enough that you may not be able to tell them apart in a blind side by side test.

Now a logic600 PSU is the sort of PSU I would avoid especially if it is old. Though do not rule out a decent brand 500w PSU if you want to save money as your parts likely won't come anywhere near that in actual power draw.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 2700k or wait for new Gen"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Well TBH that is still a good CPU. What do you use your PC for? I don't believe gaming as no discrete graphics. Unless you are doing content creation where render times are getting insanely long or other high CPU demanding task that is taking longer than you are willing to wait then I would stay with what you have now. Unless you are really struggling at multicore CPU power you may not notice much difference upgrading to a 2700x.

Comment reply on LoonyJetman's Completed Build: March 2017 VFM Gaming

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

The i7-7700k is a 7th gen Intel CPU.

Though as chance would have it JayzTwoCents just came out with a bottlenecking video that might be a good watch:

https://youtu.be/kLkV5yoCUkk

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Beginner here, air cooling vs water cooling"

  • 10 months ago
  • 6 points

I would like to differ that some air coolers are much quieter than AIOs. AIOs will have fans over the radiators and would also have pump noise and water flowing in the loop. An air cooler would only have the fans. Get a cooler like one from Noctua or Be Quiet and they include some really silent fans. The higher end coolers from those 2 companies can actually show some AIOs how its done on performance too so I would not be so dismissive on air coolers for noise and performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "sketchy at best"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

See any details that make this suspicious?

Outside of price I think you already found 2 huge red flags

First of all, it's a jewelry website. Second, there seems to be no legit company behind it.

Chances are it is a scam and is not a chance I would want to waste $110 on. Though I do remember seeing 10-20$ GTX 1080 TIs on wish and I know someone who bought one for kicks. They got a sample packet of face cream instead...... They knew it was too good to be true and wanted to see what they would actually get lmao.

Comment reply on mikmeh's Completed Build: Mini ITX Work PC

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Ahh, I was referring to current top end chips between Ryzen and Intel. The i9-9900k with the same cores/thread count to the 2700 when OC to 5.0 or some as high as 5.3 GHz do get better fps in games compared to the 2700. The 2700 is a much better value than the 9900k due to price to performance and can still deliver an awesome gaming experience as I am sure you have already experienced. Hardware that delivers a great value to you is never a bad choice!

I can see the 2700 beating a haswell i5 OC to 4.0 these days on modern games but that i5 can be re-used as it is still a decent CPU. If you can save up for a low cost case+500w PSU you may still be able to make that i5 into an HTPC with your TV. Integrated video on the intel will be ample for playing movies and other media and you won't even need to OC so it would use even less power than before. Then if you ever upgrade your GPU in the future you can drop the older 1060 back into the HTPC system for light gaming on the TV!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Air cooling vs Water Cooling"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

There are options on both air cooling and AIO. A Dark Rock 4 (non pro) will be ample to cool that CPU on stock settings or mild OC if you want to take an air cooler route. Here is a video showing how capable that cooler can be. A Dark Rock Pro 4 or a NH-D15 from Noctua will hold their own against a 240MM AIO and actually beats some of them in performance.

Sure there will be some variance between AIOs with the same size radiators but there is also the laws of thermodynamics the larger the radiator the more heat it can disperse from the loop. Basically 240mm AIOs cool better than 120MM AIOs and 280MM AIOS cool better than 240mm ones. Just about any 240mm AIO will be ample if you choose that route but I would avoid the absolute cheapest due to build quality, there is a reason why they are the absolute cheapest.

I got the older Dark Rock Pro 3 on a R7 1800x OC to 4ghz @ 1.381v and these are the temps I get. The Dark Rock pro 3 is much like the Pro 4 but the Pro 4 has a better mounting bracket and uses a new type of ceramic paint for a darker black. They both have about the same cooling performance. With all that in mind along with the points I listed before just get what you think looks best and are most comfortable with between an air cooler or AIO.

Personally I like the looks of a nice air cooler over an AIO aside from the extra peace of mind of less moving parts and less noise. Some people prefer the looks of an AIO to the point they will buy one for a locked i3-8100 when the stock cooler is ample to keep it cool. People will pay extra for aesthetics they like even if it doesn't add performance and how much they are willing to pay for it changes from person to person. I won't say that is wrong but as long as they understand what they are spending money on.

Comment reply on Arastyr's Completed Build: Little Black Box

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Fun case to build in. I had built in that exact case twice so far, once for my HTPC and second for a friend. Both times I had used non modular PSUs and cable management in that case requires some creativity. Luckily you got a fully modular PSU so that should help.

Comment reply on CoffeeAndComputers's Completed Build: Project Restoration #1

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I was about to say a decent 4 core CPU and a RX 570 is a logical pairing for a gaming PC. Sure it is haswell but getting it off a friend for free is just downright awesome price to performance especially since it can still do the job. 4 core CPUs are still able to game today just fine.

Comment reply on WreckItRob's Completed Build: Anyone can build; I just did.

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Glad to see you took the plunge and tried to build your own system. I have been building PCs for a good long while and these days it is like adult lego and straight forward. Hardware is also more durable than people realize (except CPU pins) and anyone can do it. Now that you have done it for the first time I am sure you know what I mean and likely in the future you will have more confidence in yourself considering the awesome job you did with this PC.

For the most part your part selection is good. Though I would have still just have done 16gb of ram for a pure gaming rig but it seems you have a use for 32GB for some other tasks. Adaptive sync (gsync or freesync) is great to have as many game engines out there will have FPS drops no matter the hardware and that will help make the drops less noticeable without screen tearing or stuttering caused by mismatched game fps to the monitor refresh rate. I recently got myself a 144hz freesync display and it is awesome, huge upgrade from what I had before. At least now I don't feel like my PC is being bottlenecked by my display lol.

Comment reply on mikmeh's Completed Build: Mini ITX Work PC

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure the r7 2700 may not hold the top FPS for CPU like the top end unlocked Intels are but they still do great. I only got an r7 1800x @ 4.0 GHz and your CPU should be able to hit that easily and I can still get high fps on games. Certainly not like the days of FX CPU vs Haswell where Intel wins by a huge landslide.

PSU is a bit older than I would want to use on a build as no PC hardware lasts forever. As for the case I have looked at cube style cases before but as I place my PC under my desk I would find them too wide lol. The idea of them are neat though and you didn't pay a lot for it either.

Carrying perfectly good parts over from an older build is a great way to save money and I rarely have a build where I don't do the same.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Air cooling vs Water Cooling"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Air coolers vs AIO coolers, both have pros and cons. I will not include aesthetics as a pro or con as what looks better depends on the person.

AIO Pro

  • Great performance for 240mm AIOs or larger.
  • No Ram clearance issues so you can use the tallest ram you can find if wanted
  • Easy to install

AIO Cons

  • Can be expensive
  • Due to having more moving parts has more things that can possibly break down such as pumps and leaks
  • As due to said more moving parts has more parts that can make noise
  • If something breaks other than a fan chances are you need to RMA or replace entire cooler

Air Pro

  • Often very affordable
  • Price to performance
  • higher end air coolers can perform as well if not better than some 240mm AIO liquid coolers
  • Only has fans that can really fail and fans are easy to replace
  • Less noise than AIOs as both uses fans but no other moving parts on air coolers. Can also use low noise fans too

Air Cons

  • Higher end coolers can take up a lot of room and need to aim for low profile ram for some coolers
  • Some can be harder to install due to the size and style of bracket (many are still easy)

Now failures on AIOs are things that can happen but not necessarily something that will happen within the life of a PC. Both types have a large selection of great coolers and various budgets. Myself I do prefer air coolers and run a Dark Rock Pro 3 and I really enjoy that cooler. I won't make fun of someone for using an AIO either as they are also a great option. You want to cool an i7-8700k and stated you likely wont overclock but haven't fully ruled that possibility out and for that CPU you can get both air coolers and AIOs that will allow you to OC on that chip and keep the CPU within safe temps. I would look at price and how effective a cooler is and what you like the looks of.

If you are really sensitive to PC noise but want to OC then get a Dark Rock Pro 4 or a NH-D15 or if you are really worried about reliability then air coolers with more than 1 fan has more redundancy for reliability. If you choose an AIO then generally it will last the life of the PC without an issue so reliability isn't a huge concern for most people.

I am just glad that the question of AIO or Air cooler isn't as heated of debate as PC/Mac or AMD/Intel lol.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "G4900 or Gold G4500"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

They have the same IPC so the only 2 differences are clock speed and hyperthreading. A g4900 for $40 CAD is a super low price for a coffeelake CPU and will allow you to upgrade to the 8th or 9th gen Intel CPUs later on (9th gen with bios update) so it has more upgrade options later on. The G4500 is kabylake and the top CPU in that socket is an i7-7700k but it is a faster CPU with a higher clock rate and hyperthreading.

I got a G4600 in my HTPC now and it does work great for playing back media and some light gaming with the rx 470 I got. I did build that HTPC in 2017 but now in 2019 I would be very hesitant on getting a dual core chip considering longevity of the system. If I had to choose for the price you pay for the g4900 I would get that now if I couldn't afford a better CPU now and save up and upgrade in the future to at least an i3-8100 for that kind of use. If you want to use the hardware accelerated transcoding on PLEX server then neither the pentiums/celerons would be recommended to use but if you are not using transcoding either pentium will be fine.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 2700k or wait for new Gen"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends how bad you need a new system. New stuff is always just around the corner and if you keep waiting for the next big thing you will be waiting forever.

If it is just an upgrade itch but your current CPU is working well for you now then I would suggest waiting as you will get more value out of your current hardware by using it longer. If your current hardware is holding you back from something you want to do on it then you should upgrade sooner rather than later. You don't want to be without a system that does what you need it to do for a period of time until the next thing is released.

TLDR: If you WANT to upgrade then wait, if you NEED to upgrade then go do it now. Determine if this is a want or a need.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Fan spins at max RPM despite CPU being idle"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Well with my motherboard it did have a rather aggressive fan curve for the default setting but it wasn't full blast all the time. Though I got a very quiet cooler by design but having it so quiet I can't hear if the PC is on or not is a really nice thing to have. I am currently running a Dark Rock Pro 3 and I love it. Stock coolers won't be that silent but it doesn't need to be a jet engine either. The Ryzen coolers are far better than the old FX stock coolers. If you are not overclocking you may get away with setting a lax fan curve for less noise and be fine.

Did ASRock set it to be this high because they want to be sure that the processor is properly cooled, or could there really be something wrong with my cooler and/or motherboard?

Default settings that you do not like does not make the board defective especially when you can set them to something that works better for you. Many people are not that sensitive to PC noise so most people may not even notice and I guess Asrock just wanted better cooling by default settings. People got kids or other sources of noise that will easily drown out any PC noise. I do care about noise from my case so my PC is quiet enough I can hear the fridge while in another room over my PC which is really quiet. It seems you and I have that in common lol.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel stock cooler."

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

The Be Quiet Pure Rock Slim cooler I do have some personal experience with and it is a super quiet cooler. It is currently being used in my sister's build that I helped her out with and it is overkill for her i5-8400 in terms of cooling. Sure it is not a cooler I would want to OC a higher end chip with but some smaller coolers are extremely silent too. That one only has a single 92mm fan.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cryorig M9i installation issue"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

https://youtu.be/-JyY2akopSc?t=427

That is what I meant by my comment. Double check that video about the quirk on that bracket and check your install to see if that is your issue.

Comment reply on fn230's Completed Build: Red VAIO: Windows 98 retro gaming PC / Pentium 4 531 + Radeon 9200

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

This just goes to show how far we have come in hardware since then. Single core CPUs have died off many years ago and the IPC difference is huge. Not to mention many other technologies in a PC has changed since then too.

Looking at that old case it also shows inside the case how far designs have come too. The motherboard does not sit up flush against the back of the case but is offset inside to moved the back O/I ports further in. Not to mention the shape of the mesh on the back fan too. All cases today have that flat. Speaking about I/O it has been ages since I have seen the serial and parallel ports. I used to use controllers and printers that plugged in that way.

I have had P2 and P3 systems that never had onboard audio and had to use a seperate sound card in a PCI slot. Well I do remember having AGP video cards too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel stock cooler."

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

That cooler also looks better than the Intel stock cooler imo.

If it were me I would also swap out the Intel stock cooler even if it is good enough to keep the CPU within it's safe temps only due to aesthetics. Sure I won't spend a ton of money on a cooler that is overkill but I keep a $30 or less rule if it is for looks past the stock cooler. The one Mark5916 suggested is only $25 so is a good pick but sometimes you can also find the pure rock slim or the M9i on for a good sale too they also work. Any of those 3 coolers is more than ample for a locked i5 so get what is cheapest/looks better to you.

If you decide to use the stock cooler and you are not in a hot room and have good case airflow then you should have no trouble with it aside from a bit of cooler noise.

The stock Intel cooler lacks as noise levels concerns though. It sounds like a jet! lol

Mark, you should have seen the stock cooler I got when I still had my fx 8320 back in 2013. It was louder than my dishwasher and could hear it in my bedroom upstairs with my PC on the main floor in my living room. I have yet come across a CPU air cooler that loud. Specifying air coolers there as I can imagine some chiller refrigeration coolers may get that loud lol. I had that cooler out within a week and replaced with the hyper 212 evo. Would have been sooner but had to wait for shipping.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cryorig M9i installation issue"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I would have to guess you have the 2 bars that connect the 4 posts from the motherboard mount upside down. IIRC they look upside down when you put them on the right way so it may be easy to get it backwards.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Semi vs Full PSU?"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Fully modular PSUs are great for those who want to get aftermarket cables for looks. With how decent the cable management is in that case you selected you have plenty of room to stuff unused cables away out of sight so even getting a fully non modular PSU won't matter much.

Semi modular PSUs often have the 24 pin mobo cable + 8 pin CPU cable + PCIe power connector permanently connected. With your GPU you will be using all 3 of those anyhow and the extra cables you can leave out for less cables to stuff in the basement of the PC case. If you are not using custom cables there will be zero difference in a modular and semi modular PSUs as the cables permanently connected are ones you are using anyhow. Sure people like the "freedom" of being able to choose if they want to plug in cables they must use anyhow but it is really moot. There is more of an argument between semi vs non modular for not plugging in cables you are simply not going to use at all.

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube