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Comment reply on hrachs's Completed Build: i9 Ti shoebox

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

Holy $%#@ Batman! Does she glow red during P95? LOL

All joking aside, nice clean build! Looks like a fun project to me, an expensive one but fun lol...

Comment reply on raider71's Completed Build: i9-9900k RTX 2080Ti EVGA gaming rig

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Absolute beast of a build, as stated the best money can buy for gaming at this current time.

BUT and this is a BIG BUT (hahahaha, get it)...

I'm just going to say it plain as can be, I promise you that if you are hitting 100 C in something as short lived as a CB15 run, then an actual stress test done over hours will melt that CPU into it's socket with that overclock.

Cinebench is in NO WAY a stress test, run P95 or IBT for an hour minimum and I bet it crashes your system due to temps in well under that hour. Your cooling solution is not capable of handling that overclock, Intel screwed the pooch with this chip, the solder is almost as poor as their TIM in the previous generation. Except now it is more difficult to delid and correct the problem with liquid metal.

This is not to crap on your build by the way, I like the build and it is obviously an absolute beast of a build. Just as I said Intel dropped the ball on these CPUs and rushed them to the market before Zen2 launches this spring.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Loop Spring '19"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

So I took advantage of some good deals and free shipping on Amazon and got a jump start on my project. All was purchased for under $600, so I'm please with myself.

Purchased:

(1) EK-Velocity AMD Nickel/Plexi CPU Waterblock

(2) EK-Coolstream XE 360mm Radiator

(1) EK-FC1080 Strix GPU Block - Nickel

(1) EK-FC1080 Strix Backplate - Nickel

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Loop Spring '19"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

LIST UPDATED

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Loop Spring '19"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Trying to find somewhere carrying a Swiftech Maelstrom D5 X200 Pump/Res combo. Closest I found was direct...

http://www.swiftech.com/maelstrom-d5.aspx

But even they are out of stock and no mention of when restocking may occur. I really enjoy this over the plain tube res/pump combos sold by most every other manufacture.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Loop Spring '19"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks man! The things you brought up are great key points for someone trying to do their research for sure, I've done the bare minimum in the area. I know copper/nickle don't mix with aluminum components. Flush new radiators before implementing them and things of that nature. Just not sure if I overlooked any components, I don't think so given the use of the Custom Configurator, but you never know. Another nice tip I got from Jayztwocents was the use of a cheap pipe cutter over the mini hacksaw. Love his channel and GamersNexus. Linus and Bitwit are entertaining, but not quite as informative as the other 2 (for me at least).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Loop Spring '19"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I greatly appreciate the tips, I do know a bit of the basics... As stated like metals only and the entire setup was created using EKWB's Custom Loop Configurator, so I know the components will work together as intended. This includes the bending gears, extra tubes is a good idea though for practice bends to get a feel for it.

Comment reply on weaponx9x's Completed Build: Taskmaster 1.0

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Yea, EKWB is the company I will be most likely going with for the bulk of my future liquid cooling needs. I believe you gain that kind of reputation for quality for a reason and have found over the years that sometimes when something cost more it is actually better and not just snake oil.

Comment reply on weaponx9x's Completed Build: Taskmaster 1.0

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Would, like I said if you run MemTest (Freeware) and run 12 instances @ 1000MB Ea. for an hour @ the RAM rated XMP of 3600 MHz it should fail. It won't cause immediate crashes, but can cause permanent damage over time. I was able to boot mine all the way to 3744, but anything above 3466 would fail MemTest no matter the configuration.

Yes custom loop is next on my list at tax season, which will also prompt me to swap cases for one more suited to it. Thinking the Fractal Design Define S2 for the build, hardline tubing or glass for sure.

Comment reply on weaponx9x's Completed Build: Taskmaster 1.0

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Great looking build, very clean.

One thing, the motherboard you selected is rated for a max XMP of 3466MHz... So even though your kit claims Ryzen compatibility, if you were to run 12 instances of MemTest @1000MB each (@3600MHz) you would find that your ram is going to be unstable at that frequency. Which can cause serious issues and even bork your OS and cause system failure down the road.

This is strictly because of the selected motherboard and not the RAM at fault. I would go into BIOS and dial it back to 3466MHz and work at tightening the timings after some research on the matter. I'd wager you could run it at 3466 MHz 16-18-18-38 1.35V. But again, research and study if you want to tighten the timings.

But the point of me saying all this is that stability testing on your system would show instability due to the RAM being at an XMP setting that is above what your motherboard is capable of.

Comment reply on Padfoot2222's Completed Build: First new build in a decade

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I had forgotten that too, I have the same motherboard and was attempting to ramp my 3200C16 kit from G.Skill to 3600+ and it would boot just fine, but failed every stability test I threw at it. Then I settled on 3400 over 3466, because I could tighten the stock timings at 3400 and had to loosen them at 3466 to looser than stock timings.

Comment reply on Glenfennen03's Completed Build: The Nautilus

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice! Looks great man.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

This also a good option

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Fortnite, COD, PUBG and other such titles and yes that is the plan.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points

So, I've been seeing the argument for SSD over HDD. I want to start by stating that this is absurd in terms of strictly gaming, but rather than continue to argue beyond this point I have complied an amended list.

This list now includes a more budget GPU that is still very capable of getting the job of 1080p game at 100+ FPS done. It also now includes an M.2 NvME drive for a dedicated boot drive and a large capacity SSD for storage. And a more budget friendly PSU.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor $149.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - MasterLiquid ML120L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $55.58 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI - B450I GAMING PLUS AC Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard $113.87 @ Amazon
Memory Team - Vulcan 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $129.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 970 Evo 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $87.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 1TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $166.99 @ Amazon
Video Card PowerColor - Radeon RX 580 8GB Red Devil Video Card $209.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H200 (Black/Red) Mini ITX Tower Case $89.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - CXM 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $38.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1093.27
Mail-in rebates -$50.00
Total $1043.27
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-10-18 14:20 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points
  1. Incorrect, I have friends who play multiple competitive online games launching from HDD and they have zero such issues. That includes playing against and with myself who is strictly launching from SSDs... Show me the metric data that backs this statement up.

  2. The size of the file isn't as important as the demand of the software to read and write at higher speeds, such as content creation software and productivity software. Game's are definitely minor if I stand them next to something such as Dreamweaver....

  3. Let's just say for a second that this non-sense you and another member are going on about is actually correct. With AMD he can simply utilize SenseMi to achieve very comparable performance with an SSD.

Sorry guys, I'm actually a member of forums that test/review components and they will tell you all day long that SSDs will offer no notable difference to in game performance and will provide the data to back their statements. I suggest doing some legitimate research. Yes SSDs have better read/write performance, not arguing that obvious fact. But the actual time to perform any one task in a video game, including launching the thing will be roughly the same with very slight margin at best. And it wouldn't be any sort of margin you'd be able to view with your eyes on screen.

Great example of this, my games are on an M.2 drive with read and write speeds of 3000MB/s and 1500MB/s... Which is far above any 2.5'' SSD, by your logic I would have the same advantage over someone on the traditional SSD in game. But I don't, please feel free to explain why this is the case for one but not the other. Where my M.2 drive does have the advantage over a traditional SSD is booting Windows, because it is actually a significant task.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes he does, but it isn't going to be included in the budget.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points

I do understand. However a 7200RPM HDD is still perfectly capable of being used as game storage. Many manufactures do this, because if you look at benchmarks the on notable gains in SSD over HDD is launching the OS. There are no gains that can be measured by the eye in launching minor applications such as games and to believe so is foolish and uninformed.

And to you ending statement, do as you like I guess. But to say software isn't optimized for HDD like used to be is completely ignorant. Manufactures want to get their products into the hands of as many people as possible and most of the people in the world have cheaper notebooks and desktop from companies like Dell, Apple and pre-built PCs. Computer's mind you that contain standard HDD's for the bulk storage. Are they faster on paper, yes. Real world application, only noteworthy in booting your system and perhaps more powerful content creation software (which isn't subject here).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points
  1. You are correct, I could have included more details in my OP that would help receive more informed feedback.

  2. I was just going off of stock prices, but I see where you're coming from in regards to including the aftermarket cooler we each suggested.

  3. If we exclude overclocking and an aftermarket cooler another budget use option here could be a GTX 1070 instead of a 1060 6G . As I agree it's overpriced for it's performance overall, I wish he had a budget for a 1080 as I feel they are the best deal at this current time with a good number coming in under $500. I agree the RX580 is a great option, I don't think the RX570 or 1060 3G will hold up against upgrade for more than a year or 2 at best. None the less you're correct about the value of my original suggestion.

  4. 240GB is more than enough for Windows 10. I don't see the need for more than that for a boot drive, while 1 TB offers far more storage for games which actually eat up space fast.

  5. I can agree with you last 2 statements as well, the 8400 is going to perform better in a system solely dedicated to gaming in many if not most cases. Also upgrades shouldn't be considered ever 12-18 months for CPU. However the 2600 is more than enough for simple live twitch streaming.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points

The 8400 and 2600 overclocked are on the same performance par with each beating each other in multiple benchmarks. It also $50 more expensive (NOT the same price) and includes a far inferior cooler stock. It's also only 6C/6T vs 6C/12T, making the 2600 far superior for multi-tasking such as twitch streaming.

Also overclocking is sometime quite simple these days, before my current build I had never overclocked any PC in my life. It took about 20 minutes of research and a little common sense. The 2600 can be generally overclocked as high as 4.2 GHz on safe voltage and very little adjustment to the default BIOS settings. All you need is a decent cooler, but I do value this point that for the purpose of the build wouldn't be necessary and that at stock the 2600 would be (SLIGHTLY) outperformed by the 8400.

Beyond this point, the AM4 platform has more upgrade plausibility than the Intel platform of new CPU=new MB required. Having the ability to simply swap out CPUs for another generation or more is a nice padding for the future.

Also I maintained that he mostly plays eSport titles, not exclusively. A 1060 6GB will have decent longevity to it for future games and perform in any more demanding titles he should chose to play. But I do see what you are saying in regards to strictly eSports titles.

The storage options selected were purely for helping maintain budget. Also it is simple to setup.

I guess I should specify that I would be building and setting this computer up with him. Not just handing him parts and say do this. So while I do appreciate the input, I feel your more hung up on the choice to overclock an unlocked processor with safe voltage even by AMD's standards and the choice to not purchase an entirely unnecessary and over priced large capacity SSD.

Same issue again with the 9600K by the way, 6C/6T vs 6C/12T. While just purely gaming that CPU will smoke the 2600 at 1080p, it will still perform poorer in multi-threaded task such as streaming.

My take away from this conversation, perhaps you're correct that overclocking is unnecessary to achieve the desired results in most case and insignificant gains to be made in the remaining cases. That a cheaper MB could be chosen without the need to overclock, also negating the need of an aftermarket cooler. This could in turn be money put towards a monitor to see those achieve frame rates rather than throwing that power at a 60hz television at the start. Which might be budget better used.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points
  1. Okay, that is your opinion.

  2. I'm not recommending piracy or implying it, I am saying I currently own a full retail version of windows and wouldn't need to add it to the list. You're assuming...

  3. I understand that, however when I listed it the other day it was listed at less. And not so much my needs as I was replying to the suggested PSU for a much smaller suggested case than I listed. I feel as though you're not fully reading those replies.

Comment reply on coletowler's Completed Build: Fanless

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I want to see an after pic on the cable management on the back of the case. I assume the pic you show was when you built and got it up and running.

Comment reply on EugeneScorp's Completed Build: Awesome gaming machine

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok, that is fair and yes if not just gaming and doing using any sort of productivity or content creation software 32GB is perfectly understandable.

Just grab a 1440p 144hz+ G-Sync monitor and you'll never notice the difference in the dip from 144+ to 110 in game. Just my thoughts there.

Still a great build anyway you look at it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

It just went up in price today, when I made my list it was listed at 59.99.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I like this build out as well and it certainly meets the needs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I would absolutely tend to agree with you here, my reasoning for AMD is that AM4 is getting at least one more generation of CPU and he wants to twitch stream. Which would require an 8600k or better to match the 2600 in performance. And I can easily push the 2600 beyond the 8400 in single core performance with a very moderate overclock of 4.0 GHz and even further at 4.2... But you are correct stock vs stock the 8400 will put perform the 2600 in many situation involving gaming at 1080p.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For a co-worker..."

  • 11 months ago
  • -1 points

Overclocking is intended, even if it wasn't Ryzen's boosts are based in temps and the supplied cooler is nicer than Intel's but still not very good given its fan orientation. And realistically I already have Windows 10 from my build, so I could omit the need for it anyways.

I looked at your list and would disagree on it being a better build than the one I listed, I will explain.

  1. GTX 1070 is overkill for 1080p 100+ FPS for eSport titles, it's more of a 1440p 60 FPS solution
  2. You listed an SSD with only 10 more GB capacity for $20 more, which seems completely unnecessary
  3. The RAM suggested only cost $1 less than what I listed, but with with looser timings and no heatsink
  4. The G2 has a larger footprint than the G3 and the cost is the same give or take some literal change
  5. The suggested case cost more, is cramped and has poor airflow compared to the mATX case I listed
  6. With the stock cooler on CPU and GPU in that case will cause throttling, as both their boosts are temp based

Now that isn't to say it is a poor build idea by any means and would certainly be suitable for some. But it doesn't satisfy all the criteria that I listed. I do appreciate the input though! I would say perhaps what I gained was the thought to not include windows in the price and plausibly upgrade to a GTX 1070 for more head room in the FPS department in certain titles. Or perhaps include a monitor in the purchase from the start.

Cheers

Comment reply on Ronintheshark's Completed Build: Sharkbox (black white RGB)

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Great looking build, feel like money could have been saved in places like keyboard, mouse, storage and RAM and put to better use such as GPU and CPU, but that is just me and my personal preference. Great build none the less.

Cheers

Comment reply on mlfales's Completed Build: Replacement Back Up PC (Red Theme)

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Needs work on cable management, other than that solid fun build for a office computer and on a solid budget.

Comment reply on HawaiianGrown11's Completed Build: First Build Budget Build for the normal people

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build on an impressive budget, well thought out and minimalist.

Comment reply on awulala's Completed Build: TR2080

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

Great build, super power for sure. I just can't get past Steve from GamersNexus ripping on this case at every chance he gets, so every time I see a build in one I just chuckle. More so because CM directly created the mesh version of this, because it was the original version he ripped on and they (Steve and GN) modded it with mesh for better air flow and CM wasn't too thrilled.

Comment reply on Glenfennen03's Completed Build: The Nautilus

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Dig the steam punk theme! Would love to see some brass/copper gears and perhaps a vintage incandescent light worked into the mix too. But great build either way!

Comment reply on Padfoot2222's Completed Build: First new build in a decade

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I recommend spending the extra cash on an CLC or a good air cooler. Then OC that baby to 4.3-4.4 GHz! Otherwise stock clock settings will yield better results in gaming and streaming. And it should be noted that it isn't the RAM at fault for not running at 3600 MHz stable, that Motherboard is rated for a max of 3466.

Comment reply on 2pacaveli's Completed Build: First build GTX 1080ti Ryzen 5 2600 Halloween Orange Theme

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build and some awesome deals to boot!

Comment reply on dominickdavanzo's Completed Build: I7 8700K | 1080TI BUILD

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Fair, he definitely could if he desired.

I think the Ryzen platform is better value for your money, but that stems purely from the price comparison.

An 8700K is $350 and a 2600 is $160, yes the Intel offering has about a 12-15% lead in single threaded tasks (such as gaming). However for multi-threaded workloads such as Twitch streaming, 3D rendering, video/photo editing the 2600 has a similar lead.

So overall I place the 8700K and 2600 as market equals, which just leaves price as the comparison. Nearly $200 more for the Intel product, which is why I struggled personally deciding on Intel or AMD for my gaming machine.

I didn't have a budget that would have prevented me from purchasing the 8700K, but my plan was to game at 1440p (currently an equal playing field for both Intel and AMD). So I put the additional $200 into my monitor budget and got the 2600X (that was at pre-order and the 2600 and 2600X were only $25 apart in price).

Comment reply on reffuhnayr's Completed Build: RGB NZXT h400i

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

That makes total sense, reuse what you can I feel you there. I like ASUS BIOS, I found it very easy to navigate and understand, so I imagine once you spend a few minutes looking it all over you too will find it quite palatable. I've seen people run the 2600 as far as 4.3-4.4 on Liquid, but I (given what I have observed with my 2600X) doubt their stability at those frequencies.

Mine runs @ 4.2 GHz (all core) 1.45V LLC4 with 100% stability and reasonable temps of around 71C after 2 hours+ of Prime (80% ram usage). So imagine similar results for the 2600, perhaps even higher for a select few silicon samples on the retail market. I will be interested to see what you do achieve for an OC.

Comment reply on reffuhnayr's Completed Build: RGB NZXT h400i

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice, clean and solid build with decent components and a reasonable budget. +1

What is catching my eye though, is the unnecessary use of a 750 Watt PSU, when for this build a 450-550 would be plenty. Perhaps you caught the 750 on sale which isn't being represented here, but just as it reads money could have been saved. Or perhaps you intend on running a second GPU down the road in SLI...

I also would have gone for a GTX 1080 over the 1070, purely due to the very slight difference in price between the two in the current market. Not to say the 1070 isn't a good card, because it certainly is a good GPU.

Additionally, again this is more of a from my perspective, but I would manually OC the CPU. Kinda of the fun part of the non X variants from the Ryzen series. The 2600 should be capable under liquid cooling of hitting between 4.1-4.2 GHz @ between 1.4-1.45V LLC4 and still maintain reasonable temps under load.

I don't want this to be misread as trolling or negativity. I do really like your build

Comment reply on Frozenstein's Completed Build: Project Panda ver. 1.0 (2018)

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Great build, very clean, nice color theme. I agree with PhilDilf, I personally would run the 24 pin cable behind the shroud, but that just me and personal preference. Don't listen to anyone telling you that the Ryzen 7 series would be any better than the 2600 you purchased in regards to the 1080 Ti, as if 100 MHz and 2 Cores extra would really provide any more utilization... Set that voltage to 1.4-1.45V, set the LLC to LLC4 and 4.2 GHz+ across all cores is quite doable. The only reason I got the 2600X over the 2600 was because I purchase during pre-orders and the difference in cost then was only like $20...

Comment reply on Alex-T-Foxe's Completed Build: The Blue and White Storm

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

If it weren't for the custom loop I would say pull it all apart and start from scratch.

Remove all wiring except obviously the front side I/O wiring. Use the cable channels and route everything in the back side of the case and try to group wires in the back side where you can use zip ties effectively not just in abundance one wire at a time. Make sure you are forming pathways of wiring, not just clusters that prohibit you from putter the rear panel back on.

Tidy up cable where you can't route them to the backside of the case, such as wrapping excess fan wiring around the fan itself in the back. In the front side of the case it is easy to tuck wires around some components, so that even though they are there in the front side of the case, they aren't visible.

To say the least there are several ways for you to achieve a much cleaner looking build in regards to tidiness. Be creative, take an afternoon and dedicate some time and thought to it. I'm sure you are fully capable of impressing yourself.

Comment reply on Alex-T-Foxe's Completed Build: The Blue and White Storm

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Do some proper cable management, you will truly thank yourself when looking inside of your rig. Trust me ;)

Comment reply on Flubbs's Completed Build: First Build (YAY)!

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

CPU overkill as you stated in your review of it, for this case and GPU selection you could have saved probably about $200 by grabbing an 8400 instead. Definitely the first upgrade that actually should be made is a 120GB SSD to boot the OS from instead of the mechanical drive, which will free up additional storage for your game library. Tidy up the wires a bit more perhaps, but that is more of a nit pick of mine than a need. Additionally Corsair sells a great optical mouse for less than $30, wouldn't hurt as an upgrade (if you play using keyboard and mouse in any games).

Comment reply on ryan2289's Completed Build: first build ever. mid level gaming rig

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Great little build! Clean and sleek

Comment reply on Full_Grizzly's Completed Build: Mini RTX Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Savage mini build! Loop looks great, I assume your Rez/pump are in the backside panel of your case as I don’t see it in the case anywhere in your loop.

Comment reply on Defpoint's Completed Build: Air cooled 1080ti

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build, you realize you ran that benchmark @ 1294x711 (which is below 1080p) right? So place the fan on the other side in pull, the air resistance is the same either direction... Just a thought, also that thing is probably is a bit big for a case the size of the Meshify C, which is more suited for less than GIGANTIC air coolers (LMFAO) and AIO Liquid Coolers. But I dig the look it creates, reminds me of a supercharger on the old muscle cars, feels aggressive.

Comment reply on mhenno's Completed Build: First Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I mean 4.2 GHz should be plausible at 1.4-1.45V LLC4, but as you stated it wont really translate into much in the way of FPS (maybe another 5-10 FPS max)

And you could (if not already) overclock your GPU to somewhere in the ball park of 2.0-2.05 GHz on the CORE and around 12.6-12.8 GHz on the VRAM, but again don't know as though this would do squat for your frame times if your CPU is what is causing the bottle-necking.

Overclocking both might yield 15-20 FPS total, but that would reduce the amount you're dipping down from 144.

However if you're in the market for a new monitor this would be a good situation for a G-Sync monitor that way the dip isn't notable during game play.

Comment reply on mhenno's Completed Build: First Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Are you manually overclocking the CPU? If not I would try upping the frequency to 4.2 GHz 1.4V LLC4 manually in BIOS, you might just be getting GPU bottle-necking if you are running stock. Otherwise it could just be during very large vivid scenes with a lot going on, but dropping 44+ FPS is a strange dip to me.

Comment reply on EugeneScorp's Completed Build: Awesome gaming machine

  • 11 months ago
  • -1 points

Beast! However gotta ask... Why the 8086K over the 8700K given they overclock on par with each other and the 8086 is almost $100 more? And why 32GB of RAM when 16GB is already MORE than enough for gaming? And why 1080p on a 1080 Ti when you could run 1440p 144Hz Ultra Settings on almost any title?

I'm honestly not trying to be rude or troll, just curious as to how you came to these decisions...

It looks great by the way, very clean and neat. Certainly a powerful machine no matter the purpose.

Comment reply on mhenno's Completed Build: First Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Something is off, benchmarks show the 1080 Ti hitting 140 FPS in 1440p and 75 FPS in 4K... And far beyond either at 1080p in Destiny 2.

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