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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Check my Part List Before I buy Please"

  • 5 hours ago
  • 1 point

Yes, but not necessarily a card but a storage drive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Check my Part List Before I buy Please"

  • 23 hours ago
  • 2 points

Yes HDD - HDs work without a problem as primary drives but not without limitations. SSDs are faster (highly responsive with system operations/applications), more reliable and quieter (no moving parts), and present lesser concerns with spinner form degradation/latency. In terms of performance/responsiveness, to give you some idea of what it achieves: an SSD will load windows in 10-12 seconds whereas a hard drive can take anywhere between 30-50 seconds (or longer depending on the weight of the load). Games load faster, application operations are snappier, data transfer speeds are x3/x4 quicker, etc. To get the best out of modern day fast CPUs (or system in general), you'll definitely want to secure a solid state drive!

Some budget builds will employ small capacity SSDs (120GB/240GB) for the operating system and applications (primary drive) and then couple that up with a 1TB/2TB hard drive (secondary storage - media, backups, game installs, backups, etc). This works great too.

In your case, here's what I suggest - if you want to keep the cost where it is:

  • Drop the aftermarket cooler for now and stick with the Wraith Prism stock cooler. For a bundled in cooler, the wraith prism is a solid solution for the 3700X. Granted it does get a little loud on max load but offers adequate cooling.

  • Drop down to a 650W PSU for another $20 saver. 650W is "plenty" for this build with sufficient headroom for future upgrades. You don't need the additional EPS connector which is bundled in with the 750W unit either.

  • Keeping you under $1700, the above 2 changes secures a 500GB fast NVME SSD whilst keeping the HD in check (as secondary storage). 500GB (SSD) is enough to store a handful of games (your most played ones to benefit from faster game load times/snappier in-game asset management).

eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $428.50 @ Vuugo
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard -
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory $99.99 @ Amazon Canada
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $89.99 @ Memory Express
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $74.75 @ Vuugo
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $689.99 @ Newegg Canada
Case Cooler Master MasterCase H500 ATX Mid Tower Case $157.15 @ Vuugo
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $149.99 @ Amazon Canada
Monitor MSI Optix G24C4 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor -
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1690.36
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-31 19:12 EDT-0400

If you don't need more than 1TB storage (for now), you can drop the hard drive and replace the 500GB SSD for 1000GB: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/3n2bt6/adata-xpg-sx8100-1-tb-m2-2280-nvme-solid-state-drive-asx8100np-1tt-c (not necessary, if desirable)

If the budget isn't a problem - the sky's the limit!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First time, can someone check my list?"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Intel's 10th gen (comet lake) CPUs are now available + Z490 motherboards.

A 10th gen i7 CPU (8 cores/16 threads) beats the 9th gen 9900K by a small margin and only costs $400. Or if you're looking to achieve higher multi-threaded performance possibilities, grab the newer 10th gen i9 (10 core/20 thread) processor for $20 more (above the 9900K asking price)

Comet lake:

i7-10700K - https://pcpartpicker.com/product/yhxbt6/intel-core-i7-10700k-38-ghz-8-core-processor-bx8070110700k

i9-10900K - https://pcpartpicker.com/product/cwFKHx/intel-core-i9-10900k-37-ghz-10-core-processor-bx8070110900k

If you don't mind me asking, whats the intended purpose of use? If this includes gaming, what are you targeting for display resolution and refresh rate (eg. 1080p 144hz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Check my Part List Before I buy Please"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Looks good!

note: both the display and motherboard are out of stock

Did you forget to add a SSD? or have one already? For the primary drive (OS, applications, etc) you'll definitely want one of those.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrading to 5700XT"

  • 1 day ago
  • 2 points

I just wanted to know if there'd be some issue with the GPU size and the motherboard, seeing how it's a triple fan GPU

MX330 case GPU clearance: 350 mm

GPU length: 280mm

NO PROBLEM!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help!!"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Compatibility warnings/notes:

Warning! Some AMD B450 chipset motherboards may need a BIOS update prior to using Matisse CPUs. Upgrading the BIOS may require a different CPU that is supported by older BIOS revisions.

With Zen 2 processors - for out of the box compatibility you'll either want an B450 "MAX" motherboard or a X570

Non-MAX variant B450's are also compatible but a BIOS update will be necessary to get a 3000-series processor to work. This BIOS update process requires a previous GEN CPU and once the update is complete you can then install the 3700X. Some of the MSI B450s (non-MAX) features a flash button which is a CPU-less update.

Note: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case has a front panel USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type C port, but the Asus ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard does not have sufficient USB 3.2 Gen 2 or Gen 1 headers. The case USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type C port will not be usable.

This ones self-explanatory! If you need a type C above specced USB port there are alternative case options which support this function.

Note: The motherboard M.2 slot #1 shares bandwidth with SATA 6.0 Gb/s ports. When the M.2 slot is populated, two SATA 6.0 Gb/s ports are disabled.

This is normal. Once you populate the M.2 header one/two SATA ports are disabled. The M.2 header shares the same lane hence once engaged the other end is disabled. You don't need to do anything other than check the motherboard manual to see which SATA ports are disabled and avoid them when adding additional SATA devices (hard drives/etc). With 2 disabled, you've still got 4 additional SATA's - plenty for the vast majority of users.

Note: Some physical dimension restrictions cannot (yet) be automatically checked, such as cpu cooler / RAM clearance with modules using tall heat spreaders.

just a default note - everything is fully compatible!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help with PC build / Purchase Opinion"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

If any, which CPU are you running currently?

I also have a red and black Cybertron PC Case (has an X in the middle on the front) and am wondering if I can save even more money using that.

This one? https://www.aerocool.us/strikex/strikex_one.html

If yes, its definitely usable. One of the primary concerns with older case options is choked airflow, with Cybertron Strike (aerocool) those concerns are nullified - you've got yourself an airflow king of a case with 12 fan mounts. The bare minimum for a good cooling solution is one on the front (directly behind the mesh, for air intake), one below to the side of the PSU (air intake) and one on the rear (exhaust). The rest are optional.

mainly building this PC to play Rust but I have a GTX 1050 2gb (not OC) and am wondering if I can just save money and use it.

It's definitely usable in this particular game title, similar games and more effectively with lesser demanding games. Rust: most likely you'll want to run the game on a mix of low/medium quality settings to achieve 60fps. At times with denser environments the FPS will drop below 60fps but its still playable.

Personally, i'd put together a system without purchasing a GPU and give the 1050 a shot. If the game performance/quality is not to your liking you can always upgrade later. Good card options depending on the budget: GTX 1650 SUPER ($160-$190) or preferably a 1660 SUPER ($230-$250) etc. 1660 SUPER being a worthier investment for demanding games with higher settings.

PS: For a LOCKED processor do I still need a cpu cooler?

You'll need a CPU cooler regardless of whether the chip is locked or modifiable. You'll receive a stock cooler with either of the options presented which is a mediocre unit and pretty much gets the job done. An aftermarket cooler will reduce temps, allow the CPU to boost higher and a decent unit for around $20-$35 will run quieter. Again, if you want to save money where possible, you can stick with the stock cooler and if it doesn't suit your fancy you can always upgrade later.

Another thing worth pointing out, the second build list carries a 1TB SSD. If you're only playing a handful of games or a many lesser storage devouring titles, 500GB is more than sufficient (incl. operating system, applications, etc). You can always add additional storage later, something like a larger capacity (1/2TB) typical hard drive.

2 OPTIONS

For $400

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 1600 (12nm) 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor $104.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF B450M-PLUS GAMING Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $89.99 @ Newegg
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.99 @ Adorama
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $73.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $398.94
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-29 20:46 EDT-0400

Or more preferably, for $460 a 10-15% faster Ryzen 3600 CPU! The motherboard is currently unavailable - the same applies with other reasonably priced B450 MAX motherboards which are fully compatible with the 3000-series CPU. Fingers crossed these should be available sometime soon unless pre-orders again stalls supply.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $167.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $90.00
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.99 @ Adorama
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $73.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $460.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-29 20:48 EDT-0400

There is a third option. AMD recently released more affordable Zen 2 quad core multi-threaded CPUs but unfortunately these are currently unavailable. You might want to keep tabs on the Ryzen 3100 ($99 at launch) and 3300X ($120 at launch). In terms of overall performance this third option sits between option 1 and option 2 (performance wise - Ryzen 3600 being the best of the bunch)


Last thing. If you did splurge on a superior graphics card (GTX 1660 SUPER), the total cost comes to $700. Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $167.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $90.00
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.99 @ Adorama
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB OC Video Card $239.99 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $73.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $700.95
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-29 21:00 EDT-0400

Or, $640 if you opt for the Ryzen 1600 (12nm) processor

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Have a MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Armor - need a spec to go with it!"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

Good budget for the cause :)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $167.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $189.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory $82.99 @ Newegg
Storage ADATA XPG SX6000 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $119.99 @ Amazon
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $99.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $144.99 @ Best Buy
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $11.84 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $11.84 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC 24G2 23.8" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $178.81 @ Amazon
Keyboard Logitech G413 Carbon Wired Gaming Keyboard $64.99 @ Target
Mouse Redragon COBRA M711 Wired Optical Mouse $25.48 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1136.89
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-29 15:28 EDT-0400

Being we're well-within the $1400 range, here's a couple of possibilities:

  • CPU: The Ryzen 3600, a 6 core 12 thread CPU is plenty for gaming. For some added future-proofing you have the option of swapping out for a 8 core 16 thread 3700X (just 2 additional cores and a negligible increase in single thread boosts). Personally i'd stick with the 3600 as it's plenty for gaming and for any long term effectiveness, i'd opt for a 8 core faster Ryzen 4000 series processor (expected to launch towards the end of 2020) for a more meaningful increase in performance (implies selling the 3600 at some point). The X570 motherboard is fully compatible with these next Gen ZEN 3 processors. Keep in mind the game slaughtering 3600 has plenty of mileage for several years to come and a 4000-series move is more of a "i fancy more" for the sake of it opposed to significant performance gains.

  • MOBO: X570 mobos are a little pricey. If you're not in a rush to follow through with the purchases, maybe wait a little longer for newer B550 motherboards to hit the shelves in June/July. Both 3000-series and 4000-series will be compatible with the B550.

  • DISPLAY: If interested, you could spend a little more to grab a 27" sharper image 1440p 144hz display. The GTX 1080 is capable of shooting past 60fps at this resolution (70-80fps - demanding games on ultra settings). Something like this: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/wXRgXL/lg-27gl83a-b-270-2560x1440-144-hz-monitor-27gl83a-b If you're performance driven with higher FPS achievements, definitely stick with 1080p 144hz for ~144fps possibilities.

  • PSU: Not much to say but these parts are super pricey compares to 12 months ago. But no compromises, the added part is long-term quality driven contender and I wouldn't have it any other way

  • STORAGE: If you need more storage, grab a second more affordable hard drive (2TB for $60-$80). I opted for a 1tb fast NVME SSD as it holds desirable value with faster game load ups and nippier in-game asset management. Runs completely silent with flash mem opposed to HD spinners.

  • PERIPHERALS: This ones down to use preference. At the baseline i've opted for decent parts at a reasonable asking price (incl. mech keyboard). The options are many if you're willing to spend more.

EDIT: I forgot to mention... You might fancy these equally great airflow-driven case options but both are currently out of stock or not available at their MSRP'd rate of ~$100. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FCK2FT/be-quiet-pure-base-500dx-atx-mid-tower-case-bgw37 ---or---- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/QdXYcf/phanteks-eclipse-p400a-digital-atx-mid-tower-case-ph-ec400atg_dbk (the added case is equally fantastic)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First pc build"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

Check reply above (addressing ryanziet)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First pc build"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

This is not correct. For AMD Ryzen CPUs 3600Mhz 18CL is more of an upgrade with marginal increase in performance with higher bandwidth frequencies and the same access latency.

The difference being with Ryzen processors the higher clocks (bandwidth) scales a little better, esp in games (more-so in memory intense titles). A common mistake is confusing CAS latency with "time" as CL's are quantified in clock cycles and not traditional timing methods hence "faster" clock rates with higher CLs (17/18CL) on a 3600Mhz kit achieves the same or better performance when compared with 3200Mhz 16CL.

To put in numbers:

3600Mhz/2 = 1800Mhz, 18 (CL) / 1800 x 1000 = 10.00 nanoseconds

3200Mhz/2 = 1600Mhz, 16 (CL) / 1600 x 1000 = 10.00 nanoseconds

At the base level, both deliver the "same" speed with primary low-level read requests (first word/1 byte transfers). With more complex memory processes and mounting incremental word transfers (which is common in gaming) this is where the higher 3600Mhz 18CL kit drives a little added performance (lesser latency (nothing to lose your hat over, but in some games as much 2% increase in FPS). Other factors on Ryzen-orientated platforms also add incentives with higher memory clock bandwidths (infinity fabric sweet spot @ 1800Mhz, data load efficiency, etc).

The bonus perk being, with 3600Mhz 18CL sticks it's not too difficult to further tighten timing controls (per clock rate) somewhere in 16/17CL region which outpaces 3600Mhz 16CL by a considerable rate (~1/2 ns lesser latency)

The above is more in reflection of AMD Ryzen Zen+ and Zen 2 (Ryzen 3600, etc) platforms whereas on intel builds the difference in realised performance is lesser when comparing the 2 specs hence it wouldn't matter. Since the OP is picking up a Ryzen platform, for $8 more the faster 3600Mhz 18CL makes sense and even better the opportunistic lower latency tweaks achieves more considerable performance strides hence plenty of play-headroom for the willing!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Have a MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Armor - need a spec to go with it!"

  • 3 days ago
  • 2 points

What are you looking to spend? a rough budget would help.

Just gaming or streaming too?

Confirm whether the budget includes peripherals (display/keyboard/mouse/etc) and the operating system (Windows)?

BTW - solid gaming GPU!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC Build"

  • 3 days ago
  • 2 points

By "current" i'm assuming you have the 1660 already in hand. Definitely keep it!! The super variant only earns a 10% performance gain. In real-time gaming the numbers look a little different, depending on game and quality configurations - variably 4-10fps achievements which is too small to warrant an upgrade (IMO). From a real-world visual perspective, 4-10fps gains almost goes unnoticed hence not worth the dollar drop.

A worthier upgrade from a 1660 is a RTX 2060 SUPER or higher. If you're budget limited and the 1660's getting the job done, wait till next Gen cards (NVIDIA/AMD) which are expected towards the end of 2020 or early 2021 and return the benefits: greater performance returns and better justification for the spend.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First pc build"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

For a first build part selection, this looks great!!

Some minor amendment/additions:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $167.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Best Buy
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory $72.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.99 @ Adorama
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $303.98 @ Newegg
Case Deepcool MATREXX 50 ADD-RGB 4F ATX Mid Tower Case $68.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $83.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $915.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-28 20:16 EDT-0400
  • For higher core boost elevation (Ryzen 3600) and quieter acoustics, preferably an aftermarket cooler (larger heatsink + vapour chamber and heatpipes). The stock cooler on the 3600 is mediocre at best and gets pretty loud.

  • Preferably higher bandwidth ram (3600Mhz) - Ryzen likes!

  • Save a few bucks on the NVME SSD and grab the Crucial P2 NVME. By comparison, for a gaming setup, there's next to zero difference in performance but a $15 saving.

  • You don't want to skimp on the juice. A better quality and more efficient PSU added, finer component make-up, better protection features and semi-modular as an added perk for easier build management.

OPTIONAL replacing the 500GB SSD for a 1TB unit only raised the budget by 16 bucks (if interested). Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/mr8j4D/adata-xpg-sx6000-pro-1-tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-asx6000pnp-1tt-c

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Build dedicated to Video Editing/Rendering"

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

......to stay roughly in the $3000-$4000 ballpark.

For 1080p video editing/render, you've got yourself a killer NO-COMPROMISE budget!! Two options:

OPTION 1

Modern day consumer platforms are now supporting higher core count multi-threaded processors + PCIe 4.0 bandwidths for plenty of functionality going forward. Something like this will blast through any workload you throw at it at a similar pace with enterprise level platforms. A 3900X here (12 cores 24 threads) is a scorcher for 1080p workloads and is simply fast enough to conquer quick render completion times. Also capable of handling 4K at a relatively nippier pace.

As for the GPU, you don't need anything past a 1660 SUPER / RTX 2060 for after effects/PP (same applies with 4K). Higher-tier performing GPUs scale miserably with these types of workloads as you're mostly CPU bound. If gaming too, your options open up!

32GB should be plenty for 1080p workloads.

And a bucket load of savings. The X570 platform also supports next gen nippier CPUs (Ryzen 4000-series) hence a a nice upgrade path for the long run if you end up scaling higher with 4K+ res workloads.

Since you've got a boat load of cash sitting idly, is did throw in a "how about a 2TB NVME SSD as a secondary drive" opposed to a more affordable traditional hard drive [optional - although i admit, getting rid of my hd's on my personal rig for a silent flash mem SSD is music to my ears]

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $418.60 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $89.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $189.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory $144.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Amazon
Storage ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $259.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $324.99 @ Newegg
Case be quiet! Pure Base 500DX ATX Mid Tower Case $99.90 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $164.99 @ Best Buy
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $108.78 @ Other World Computing
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1902.12
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-27 21:32 EDT-0400

OPTION 2

Enterprise class build with superior higher core count export rendering performance. A more versatile option if you want to keep your options open to 4K+ workloads or just fancy the bees knees whilst keeping well-within the budget ceiling.

CHANGES:

  • a 24 core 48 thread Ryzen 3960X threadripper

  • TRX40 mobo (pricey bugger)

  • 64 gigs of RAM with board supporting max: 256GB

  • Super performing RTX 2070 SUPER graphics card. If you're sticking with 1080p workloads/previews don't bother with the 2070 super, stick with the previous RTX 2060. TBH, even at 4K, the 2070 super's performance gain is marginal but it is what it is - well-within budget and a faster rendering GPU with somewhat better optimised VRAM.

  • plenty of bandwidth for I/O functionality

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Threadripper 3960X 3.8 GHz 24-Core Processor $1299.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler be quiet! Dark Rock Pro TR4 59.5 CFM CPU Cooler $89.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI TRX40 PRO 10G ATX sTRX4 Motherboard $444.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Trident Z 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL17 Memory $301.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Amazon
Storage ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $259.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Best Buy
Case be quiet! Pure Base 500DX ATX Mid Tower Case $99.90 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $164.99 @ Best Buy
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $108.78 @ Other World Computing
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3370.51
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-27 21:57 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Extremely old pc, is it worth upgrading"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

350 quid is a decent chunk of money for these types of upgrades.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
Storage ADATA SU630 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £48.78 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB OC Video Card £219.98 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £69.98 @ Currys PC World Business
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £338.74
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-28 02:00 BST+0100
  • Opted for a 1660 'super', seeing a nice performance uplift for the long run. Also makes for a nice pair-up if you end up upgrading the rest of the system in the long run (CPU/mobo/memory)

  • You certainly don't need a 650W PSU unit but this ones a solid build with excellent protection features... only 5/10 quid above the 450-550w sufficient requirement.

  • Doubled up on storage capacity @ 480GB. Save your most played games on the SSD to benefit from faster game load ups and the rest of the games library on the 3TB HD.

Other possibilities: Keep an eye on CPU clock speeds and thermals using some monitoring/sensory software (eg. openhardware or the more complex HWINFO). If it's running hot or throttling down with clock frequencies consider removing the cooler and re-pasting (thermal compound). If the coolers schite, grab a £20 cooler https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/LPVBD3/cryorig-cpu-cooler-m9i (it does pop you a little north of £350)

Other notes:

  • For the GPU upgrade, make sure your case carries sufficient GPU clearance. Pre-builts can be tricky depending on the layout but generally a card of this size shouldn't be a problem.

  • If opting for a CPU cooler, again check for clearance (height)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Extremely old pc, is it worth upgrading"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm assuming the build is for gaming.

the i5-6400 is capable of achieving 60fps @ 1080p in newer games. A handful of demanding titles will require a mix of quality settings ~med/high to meet the 60fps target. In other words you've got plenty of quad-core juice to play with.

Stay on the same platform and have a crack at the following:

  • Upgrade GPU. The GT 705 is not only ancient but at launch was an entry level lesser graphically intense gamer or to be more blunt, just a GPU to get display/s running.

  • With a HP pre-built based around a GT 705 I wouldn't be surprised if you're carrying an entry level lower watt PSU. It's likely the PSU needs upgrading too.

  • An SSD would be nice for nippier system responsiveness. Min. 240GB for the operating system and applications.

The SSD installation is a good opportunity to re-install windows (freshly). This will help to remove all the excess, bloat, dumps and any unwanted applications to free up backend processes. The lesser the system processes the lesser the core consumption = better gaming performance on a quad core chip. Your current 3TB hard drive can be used as a secondary storage for game installations, media, back-ups, etc

I'm on a pretty tight budget atm.

How much can you manage for the upgrades?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Build dedicated to Video Editing/Rendering"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

In order to draw up a list with the correct currency, where are you based?

Some idea as to how much you are willing to spend would help. An all-mighty powerful build can cost anywhere in the region of $4000-$6000 - esp if you're targeting to max out on an enterprise level platform (pref. AMD threadripper).

If the budget is limitless, what type of video resolutions are you working with (1080p/4K/6K/etc)?

With current workload engagements, how much memory are you using?

Storage requirements?

Are your workloads (or applications) heavily GPU-bound? (eg. Davinci Resolve, etc). In fact which applications are you using?

Operating system required (Windows)?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with building a high end-ish PC?"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Sorry for the late reply

Said the moving back thing cause I thought there'd be some electricity/wattage? issues when moving to different countries.

You will need to look into voltage variances a little deeper. Generally USA/Japan voltage scales universally (same range 100v-110v + 2-pin compatible) but where there is variance in supply, for sensitive or powerhouse equipment I would look to local electrical stores for best advice. A little more info here: https://travel.stackexchange.com/questions/10417/can-i-use-a-power-adapter-designed-for-usa-in-japan

For the display 1440p is fine but im prettttty sure ill just be gaming at 1080p

With your type of budget i'd fancy a larger 27" sharper image 1440p 144hz panel for a little better immersive gaming experience. If you prefer with super high refresh rate gaming with the likes of 240hz, then 1080p it is. Build recommendation is based on 1440p (144hz, IPS, GSYNC compatible) hence let me know if you prefer a different option.

I'm definitely open to having two builds.

Good choice:

DEDICATED GAMING BUILD

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $274.99 @ Walmart
CPU Cooler Scythe Ninja 5 43.03 CFM CPU Cooler $59.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $189.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $86.99 @ Best Buy
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $119.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $759.99 @ Best Buy
Case be quiet! Pure Base 500DX ATX Mid Tower Case $99.90 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $124.99 @ Best Buy
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $108.78 @ Other World Computing
Monitor LG 27GL850-B 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $449.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2275.60
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-26 16:32 EDT-0400

Notes:

  • GPU: Your budget can easily secure the RTX 2080 TI (best gaming card currently available). Problem being, 'best' is also poorly valued at a much higher asking price and in return the higher premium doesn't justify the performance gain. The RTX 2080 SUPER makes for the better investment and easily handles 1440p demanding games on ultra settings. The investment being, selling the card sometime down the line for a "more superior" performing next generation GPU - expected in 2020. The newer Gen RTX 3080 TI is expected to secure faster memory, highly efficient ray tracing algorithms and possibly (as rumours suggest) anywhere between 30-50% increased performance over the current 2080 TI. Another reason to avoid the 2080 TI is, the card will plummet in re-sale value at a staggering rate when newer GEN GPUs launch.

  • CPU: You also have the option of upgrading to a marginally faster 10th Gen intel CPU (recently launched) although it's not going to make much difference in game performance, esp @ 1440p higher resolutions. The AMD solution is more desirable in my opinion, for it's excellent value and more importantly confirmed compatibility with Ryzen 4000 series CPUs on the X570 platform (expected soon/2020 or early 2021).

Both of these upgrade possibilities are not necessary as the build is fantastic for the task. These are just splurge worthy open possibilities to secure greater performance in the long run (if desired). In other words, the build as it stands carries plenty of years going forward and should chew up and spit out anything you throw at it.

DEDICATED STREAMING BUILD:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $172.34 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M MORTAR MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $120.00
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory $72.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.99 @ B&H
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 550 - 512 4 GB PULSE Video Card $84.99 @ Newegg
Case darkFlash DLM 22 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $65.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $83.98 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $108.78 @ Other World Computing
Monitor BenQ GW2480 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $119.99 @ Amazon
Custom Elgato Game Capture HD60 Pro $199.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1132.03
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-27 15:04 EDT-0400

Notes:

  • CPU: Generally for smooth decent quality 1080p 60fps streams, a quad core processor is plenty (eg. 3100/3300X). I've gone for a 6 core processor opening up higher quality versatility or higher resolution streaming options.

  • CPU/GPU: I've gone for a Ryzen processor + a dedicated graphics card. The GPU enables options to add more than one display to the dedicated streaming build. If you're happy with a single display the alternative option being an integrated graphics CPU from intel: i5-10400/i5-10600K with a B460/H470/Z470 motherboard (expected soon). This eliminates the need to pay extra for a graphics card.

  • Case: This ones purely down to user preference - i've added something based on reasonably good value.

  • Storage: I've opted for a 500GB SSD. If you need more storage you can swap it out for a 1TB SSD or stick with 500GB for the primary and grab a more affordable and larger capacity 1/2TB hard drive. More storage is entirely down to user requirements - if you intend of piling up on saved recordings for future reference the higher capacity and better value conventional HD would be the desired option.

  • Display: I've opted for a 1080p 60hz panel for the streaming build. Usually I prefer a larger 1440p display to go with my 1440p gaming rig but the true convenience with multi-tasking for me is x2 individual 1080p panels as I run a bunch of stuff in the background (work-related).


I intentionally left out other peripherals (keyboard/mouse) for now. You might have several questions regarding the above builds - feel free to ask.

Also, with the recent Covid-19 pandemic, online sales have surged and its proving difficult to locate some parts. A couple of parts in these lists are either sold out (stock expected) or are victim to high demand low supply overpricing (should settle down).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 8gb enough?"

  • 6 days ago
  • 2 points

how do you think I should configure the fans In my case?

Generally, x1 fan on the rear to exhaust air. x1/x2 on the front for air intake does the job. If you end up adding fans on the top too, these should be set to exhaust as heat travel upwards.

Also, what do you mean the back panel being flush again the mobo, does that mean that I won't have much space for wires?

There is sufficient space to route wires from behind the motherboard wall but a little tight. It's not an issue, with some careful planning you can easily route cables and have them tied down with zip ties.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with building a high end-ish PC?"

  • 6 days ago
  • 4 points

Location: Japan but im moving back to the States at some point.

If this implies the build requirement is for a later date this would carry some meaningful performance gains/possibilities with newer CPU options (intel 11th Gen is already launched, with Ryzen 4000 (Zen 3) / Zen 2 refreshes + Nvidia/AMD higher-tier next generation graphics cards expected sometime in 2020).

A single platform for ~$3/$4k is more than sufficient for gaming and streaming. Although with this type of budget I'd be more inclined to opt for a 2-build solution with gaming on one platform and dedicated streaming on the other (incl. a capture card). The 2 build solution removes encoding performance hits on the gaming side (FPS) and a bunch of other lesser concerning but evident latency/performance hits with 2 heavy workloads wrestling for system resources (memory, storage, multiple core peak sustainability, etc etc). Also a side benefit, with 2 builds you get 2 displays which does wanders for "active" multi-tasking whilst gaming (stream content management, social content, browsing, etc - without having to minimise gaming sessions). Let me know your thoughts!

About the gaming display - what resolution are you looking to secure? 1080p, 1440p, 1440p ultra widescreen, 4K? This will help to determine which GPU would serve best without splurging for overkills which gain little benefit for most.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 8gb enough?"

  • 6 days ago
  • 2 points

For the asking price ($50 cad) the FBM-X2 is decent. Not the best build quality but at this price on a budget - no complaints!! Plenty of fan mounts for on the front and top (x4) for improved airflow (something you can build on later if desired), decent air vents around the front panel for lesser obstructive air intake, nice bunch of top I/O panel ports for a daily driver and although aesthetically i prefer glass windows this case supports perforated holes on the side panel which helps with GPU temps (bonus)!! If you haven't checked already, the FBM-X2 supports 300mm GPU clearance hence no concerns with GPU compatibility, and a ton of additional clearance for front fan installations.

The only negative worthy of mention is the back panel being flush against the motherboard wall. With some clearance it helps to better manage and organise PSU/mobo/hardware cables. Just take your time and plan ahead with cabling for a breezier build process.

EDIT: my bad no perforated vent on the side panel - no biggie!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 8gb enough?"

  • 7 days ago
  • 2 points

Or will it be hard to fit the card in a micro atx case?

As long as the case has sufficient GPU clearance you shouldn't have any problem. The selected GPU comes in at a length of 264mm. Check your preferred case product specifications to see if the case supports 264mm/+ clearance. Or share the case make and model or a link to a product page and I'll have a quick look.

Hey, I haven't ordered yet, and the price of the 3300x in Canada has gone up so Ill probably be going with this build. Do you think that I should be getting more fans for the case, since it only comes with one fan compared to the 2 fans of the other coolermaster case?

Either option will work. 2 fans are not necessary but more of a preference based on improved airflow.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rtx 2060 super cooling help"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

Generally, GPU's are more than sufficient with their pre-assembled heatsinks and cooling fan/s. To keep things running smoothly the primary method is to achieve better airflow for your case with intake and exhaust fans (providing the case offers sufficient airflow vents and fan mounting possibilities).

For additional info, help us with the following:

  1. Case make and model? Or send a product link.

  2. Describe your current fan set up for the case. Or if you have a full parts list available, share it.

  3. Are you monitoring temps under GPU load (gaming/etc)? If yes, how are the temps stacking up?

Does the nzxt kraken setup work with this?

I'm assuming you're referring to modding the GPU for a NZXT AIO liquid cooled solution using a Kraken G12 mounting kit. This is purely optional and not a necessary requirement. As for compatibility, the G12 supports a number of cards but for your specific model pop them an email to double check. The G12's compatibility list informs the RTX 2060 is incompatible which is a pretty strong indication that the same applies to the Super variant. No harm in double checking with NZXT support. There are workarounds but if you're new to PC building i'd suggest avoiding them for now.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 8gb enough?"

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

With 8GB playing music simultaneously is harmless. You can run way more similar low memory utilising tasks without harming game performance. It's processes like streaming, backend rendering/editing/recordings, heavier multi-tasked active browsing tabs, etc that take a larger a chunk out of memory resources. You've got nothing to worry about!

I was just looking at CAD prices for 8GB kits (2x4GB). You'll want something like 3200Mhz @ 16CL which delivers ample bandwidth for Ryzen CPUs to peak up more comfortably with boost clocks. The best affordable option was this one: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/D6RFf7/gskill-memory-f43200c16d8gvkb which is coming in at $60 CAD.

Alternatively, for only $30 cad more (if possible), you could secure a 16GB kit https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/z3VD4D/team-t-force-vulcan-z-16-gb-2-x-8-gb-ddr4-3200-memory-tlzgd416g3200hc16cdc01

If you haven't purchased any parts already, how about the following amendments:

  • A Ryzen 3100 processor which delivers parallel gaming performance compared with a 8th/9th GEN intel i5 CPU. If you add a third party beefier stock cooler (later), overclocking the 3100 achieves the same/similar performance as the 3300X. Ideally you'll want an aftermarket cooler anyway with the 3300X to get the best performance out of it hence a 3100 + cooler + OC makes sense too. With a 3100 in the bag + a more affordable case, the following is possible:

  • 16GB RAM

  • A "Max" series 2-dimm slot (more than sufficient if you're grabbing 16gigs of RAM from the get go) motherboard which eliminates the need to update BIOS prior to using 3100/3300X. Keep in mind, a BIOS update will require a previous gen CPU (something attainable as a loan from AMD).

  • A 10-13% faster GTX 1660 "SUPER" graphics card for only $20 more

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 3 3100 3.6 GHz Quad-Core Processor $149.99 @ Canada Computers
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-M2 MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $106.70 @ Vuugo
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $88.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage TCSunBow X3 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $75.98 @ Amazon Canada
Video Card Asus GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB TUF Gaming X3 OC Video Card $339.00 @ Canada Computers
Case Cooler Master MasterBox E500L ATX Mid Tower Case $53.05 @ Vuugo
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $84.99 @ Amazon Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $898.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-24 12:24 EDT-0400

That's a total of $900. If you can add another $15, i'd be tempted to drop the SATA driven SSD (although it's perfectly fine for gaming purposes) and grab a faster M.2 interface NVME SSD (a nice added perk being, no additional cables to worry about as these simply slot onto the motherboard). Eg. https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/jrGnTW/adata-xpg-sx8100-512-gb-m2-2280-nvme-solid-state-drive-asx8100np-512gt-c

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 8gb enough?"

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

If you're tight on budget, 8GB (2x4GB kit) is perfectly fine for gaming and will run anything and everything without any major concerns. Make sure to grab a kit consisting of 2 sticks to make use of dual channel memory perks (greater bandwidth, greater efficiency and a small uplift in FPS performance).

It is possible a handful of newer graphically intense titles (esp. on higher resolution displays) will see some performance penalties or even lag but these are easily remedied with reduced in-game quality settings. At 1080p this isn't really a concern unless you're cranking up advanced graphics settings alongside ultra presets. I generally run a mix of settings to achieve better performance as long as the compromise on the visual end remains minimal or unnoticeable.

With 8GB you'll want to keep the memory banks clear of any third-party heavier memory hogging processes. At it's bare application system spec (OS and traditional software packages) if you only intend on running games then 8GB will be a blast! The same doesn't apply to my nephew - somehow he's downloading or openings doors to a gazillion-and-1 applications/plug-ins/adware/malware/a ton of other bloat/etc etc from the web. 99% pointless stuff that never gets used and a significant number uselessly running in the background. The performance penalties were massive!! Some games would only run on the lowest of settings and a handful of triple AAA titles were unplayable (BF1/GTA 5/etc). A quick fresh windows reinstall fixed the problem and now his inferior gaming spec (compared to yours) with 8GB is smashing through all or any titles without a sweat.

NOTE: 16GB 3200Mhz+ does see some increase in FPS performance in some heavier titles but nothing massively noteworthy to push up on it. Generally 16GB is the safer bet as games are beginning to expand on memory requirements but i believe 8 gigs still carries a few more years before things get a little rough. On a positive note: your motherboard supports 4 dimm slots hence when the time calls for it you can always upgrade to another 2x4GB kit to make 16 gigs OR if you can manage 16GB now without compromising performance elsewhere go for it (eg. 2x8GB)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Want Opinions On My List - First Build"

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

Assuming this build is for gaming and you're happy to post a little above $900 for some meaningful performance uplift (@$923):

  • Only $15 more for a faster 3rd Gen Ryzen 3600 processor

  • Superior performing RTX 2060 graphics card (incl. ray tracing). A nice possibility if you're targeting a higher refresh rate/higher resolution display.

  • Amongst other changes without compromising performance

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $172.39 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450-A PRO MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $103.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston A400 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $39.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $58.98 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $303.98 @ Newegg
Case Metallic Gear Neo Silent ATX Mid Tower Case $55.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $83.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $923.26
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-22 19:10 EDT-0400

Note [storage]: I left the storage selection as it is. You might fancy looking into consumer faster NVME SSDs which are relatively affordable. Depending on your immediate storage requirements, possibly consider a single a 1TB NVME SSD (m.2 interface) https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Power Supply Unit"

  • 12 days ago
  • 1 point

Is the 750W requirement a must?

Where are you based (country/local currency)?

I take it a fully modular + gold certified unit is part and parcel with the requirement.

Reputable alternatives (in no particular order):

  • FSP Group Hydro G

  • Corsair RM (2019)

  • SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold

  • Phanteks AMP (Seasonic build)

  • EVGA G2/G3 (G3's a trimmed version of G2 with a smaller fan but a little louder)

  • Etc

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrade opinions?"

  • 14 days ago
  • 1 point

I want to stay with my current platform as I feel the 7700k has some more life left into it to perform well in anything I put it through.

Good choice! Assuming it's a gaming build - the 7700K is a monster of a CPU for the task (plenty of juice to carry forward for a couple/+ years). I was meaning to upgrade my 2017 purchased 7700K after 3 years but here in 2020, by comparison, i'm not impressed at all with any of the newer GEN offerings. Granted, some of the higher core/thread count CPUs would do wonders in multi-thread optimised workflows but for gaming the 7700K competes at the highest level (esp. manual OC@4.9~5GHz putting the 7700K at a competing parallel with any newer GEN product).

I'm also considering faster/better RAM and potentially an RTX 2070s

The installed 3200Mhz kit in this intel platform is already "golden" and anything else with faster clockspeeds or lower CAS latency will achieve negligible benefit. You'll be better off saving your money and having a crack at overclocking/tightening timing controls.

The only real upgrade path here is the GPU. I agree the 2070 SUPER would be a nice fit for higher refresh rate (144hz) gaming. Although I agree with xxxtinct, the 1070 remains road-worthy for 1080p gaming and splashing out $500 for a 2070 super only achieves around 20-25fps more over the 1070 (based on demanding games on top settings). I too would wait a little longer for AMD/Nvidia to push out next GEN GPUs in 2020 for a more significant performance uplift for the spend.

As for the case... a good upgrade here might be one which is predominately airflow orientated. Both the S340 and H500-series NZXT cases are moderately decent in this respect and within a similar price bracket there are options available with free-flowing lesser obstructive air intake (meshed frontage). Couple of top performing case options:

Although I get it if you prefer the H510's minimalist compact design aesthetic

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this good for streaming?"

  • 14 days ago
  • 2 points

so should i just do the same build but with with an RTX and the processor? can i still use that motherboard?

Yes. Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $184.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $80.00
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.98 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $329.99 @ Newegg
Case darkFlash DLM 22 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $65.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $909.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-17 22:13 EDT-0400

changes:

  • Ryzen 3600 CPU

  • RTX 2060 graphics card

  • preferably a 550W rated PSU for some added efficiency headroom

  • Case swap for something with swing-door tempered glass + more than adequate airflow with the single well-perforated side vents + PSU shroud to keep things nice and tidy from an aesthetics perspective. Probably my favourite Micro-ATX case option in the $50-$70 pricing tier (although your initial front air-intake king Meshify C choice for $25 more is a tough one to ignore)

p.s. the mobo is currently out of stock - Amazon is expecting a fresh batch on 25th May. Unfortunately the same applies to a bunch of these Ryzen 3rd Gen ready boards as recent spiked demands are met with shortages. You might want to check elsewhere for availability or locally (micro centre, etc). Keep an eye out for other B450 MAX options too (Micro-ATX/Full-ATX).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this good for streaming?"

  • 14 days ago
  • 1 point

Also, do i need to stream using x264 or the GPU encoder?

For a dedicated streaming (with gaming on console) you don't need a GPU for encoding purposes, the CPU's (x264 software encoding) raw compute power will offer greater flex.

If gaming and streaming simultaneously on the same build, the preference = GPU encoder (NVENC). Whilst games utilise mostly CPU resources for best performance, encoding with the GPU will help eliminate wider performance hits on the gaming side (FPS). For a respectable card to achieve smooth 1080p 60fps output without performance/quality/latency penalties you'll want to target an RTX card (RTX 2060 / RTX 2060 SUPER / RTX 2070 ). Since you are open to gaming too on the same build, i'd grab a Ryzen 3600 processor for $30 more which achieves a nice 15% uplift in single threaded performance (higher FPS achievements @ 1080p gaming)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bios Update"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

This would require a previous GEN CPU in order to boot up and update to a "3rd Gen compatible" BIOS patch.

If you have a spare CPU laying around, the update process is simple. If not, you can probably ask AMD to loan a CPU (if that service remains active).

For out-of-the-box compatibility with 3rd Gen Ryzen, you'll be looking at grabbing a B450 "MAX" motherboard which comes with a larger BIOS chip which hosts full feature forward optimisations or alternatively the little more pricier X570 motherboard. If the budget is capable, I would grab a X570 as its certified to run with AMD's next generation of ZEN 3 processors (a fancy upgrade path if the performance gains are worthy).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this good for streaming?"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

For a 1080p 60fps dedicated streaming build you have 2 options:

OPTION 1:

  • For 1080p 60fps, the i5 CPU with integrated graphics is sufficient (discrete graphics is not required)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-9400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $168.15 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler be quiet! Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler $35.29 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock B365M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $74.99 @ Newegg
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.98 @ Amazon
Case Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $49.13 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $527.51
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-17 14:31 EDT-0400

OPTION 2

  • With a $1K budget for a dedicated streamer, you can flex some muscles and opt for a higher core count / higher threaded CPU (Ryzen 1600 AF-12nm, 2600 or even the +$30 3600). Unfortunately with recent spikes in demand the $85 1600 12nm and $115 2600 are both overpriced which makes the 3600 a desirable but not necessary option (I've opted for the 2600 for now). These are all 6-core 12-threaded processors and the greater the CPU resource the greater the encoding quality versatility + lesser latency driven multi-tasking efficiency. These chips are capable of outputting "higher quality" 1080p 60fps streams or higher resolutions.

  • Absent of integrated graphics, for a single 1080p 60hz display a lightweight dedicated GPU will get the job done! You don't need a 1660 TI/1660 super for running a display unless you're intending on gaming on the PC too. If you're looking for a multi-monitor display setup - preferably a RX 570/GTX 1650 SUPER.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $155.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $80.00
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.98 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GT 710 1 GB Video Card $44.99 @ Amazon
Case Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $49.13 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $568.06
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-17 15:04 EDT-0400

Notes:

  • Feel free to replace the budget case back to the more premium feature rich and more aesthetically pleasing Meshify C Micro ATX case (the above replacement is just a little saver if interested)

  • The 8 core Ryzen 2700X was selling for around $150. If you're not intending on pulling the trigger immediately you might want to keep tabs on either the 2700/2700X (not necessary for 1080p 60fps but would be desirable if achievable for a similar $150 range - especially if you're eyeing up a 4K capable elgato card)

I'm just curious, were you targeting the 1660 TI for gaming possibilities too? or a multi-display configuration?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions needed!"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

Any board recommendations with built-in wireless network?

Integrated WIFI:

and a GPU similar to the 1660 that has 2 HDMI ports?

x2 HDMI filtered results for 1660 SUPER/1660 TI (both deliver parallel performance) + RTX 2060: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#c=450,438,436&sort=price&H=2,3

If the desired card is too pricey, you have the option of picking up bidirectional converter cables/video port adapters for under 10 bucks.

Looks like the B450 Max board can run the 3600 out the box which is nice!

yep, the "MAX" variants are revised models from MSI with larger BIOS chips to accommodate 3rd Gen Ryzen boxed compatibility + forward optimisations. Although it's not confirmed, I wouldn't be surprised if these boards receive BIOS updates in the coming months or a year or so to support 4000-series CPUs. The X570 (linked above) is already confirmed to support Ryzen 4000 if you don't mind spending a little extra.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3700X or 9700K?"

  • 15 days ago
  • 2 points

I'm also backing the 3700X (lemmeG sums it all up nicely) although.....

...about the 3700X - only a small number games are well-optimised to reap benefit with 2 additional cores. The benefits are mostly negligible in real-world perceptible performance comparisons. Considering you've secured a Zen 3 compatible X570 mobo (profile spec), I'd be more leaning to grab a 6 core 3600 which is achievable for almost half the cost and then look to upgrade to a 6/8-core 4000-series ZEN 3 CPU when released in a few months (for a more meaningful performance boost). The difference between 3600 and 3700X is additional compute throughput for multi-threaded workloads (with 2 additional cores/4 threads) with nothing to gain with single thread clockspeeds (a tiny spark at best). In other words, both chips deliver parallel performance in gaming and the little gains achieved with the 3700X in some titles are not enough to warrant an additional $115 (IMO). Zen 3 4000-series on the other hand is speculatively expected to deliver a 15%+ single threaded clockspeed performance gain, better efficiency + the anticipated improved optimisations with scaled multiple/all-core boosts. Even better, the 3600 chip is extremely likely to maintain excellent re-sale value - either a reasonably 20-25% reduction for a used asset or since CPUs are treated like gold possibly a $140-$150+ selling point (purely speculatively speaking).

If you can't be bothered with the X570 upgrade opportunities, grab a 3700X as it does add "long-term" performance value with it's added compute resources.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions needed!"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

For ~$900 you can do better. In a nutshell:

  • Faster 3rd Gen Ryzen CPU

  • A revised B450 MAX motherboard for better forward ZEN 2 optimisations

  • Faster RAM

  • Faster/significantly superior GPU (greater advantage for gaming + viewport GPU accelerated modelling)

  • A CPU cooler to keep things running cool, fast and quiet.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $119.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $0.00
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $239.99 @ Newegg
Case Corsair SPEC-02 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $833.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-16 22:37 EDT-0400

Alternatively if you're targeting a 1080p higher refresh rate display (144hz) or a higher resolution display, preferably a beefier GPU with the likes of a RTX 2060 (less aftermarket CPU cooler)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $119.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $0.00
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $329.99 @ Newegg
Case Corsair SPEC-02 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $884.94
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-16 22:41 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How would you improve this list? ($1000-$1200 budget)"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

The graphics card is the 1660 super, mainly to maximize my savings and make upgrading down the road more compelling....

I like this frame of thought, especially considering both AMD and Nvidia are expected to launch newer generation GPUs sometime in 2020 (AMD confirmed although mid-range cards may follow a little later, Nvidia remains probable). Since you're mostly targeting CIV-6, the 1660 SUPER already secures sufficient power to draw high quality returns whilst performing well-over 60fps. Hence not a bad idea!

About the 3700X. Only a small number games are well-optimised to reap benefit with 2 additional cores. The benefits are mostly negligible in real-world perceptible performance comparisons. Considering you've secured a Zen 3 compatible X570 chipset (motherboard), I'd be more leaning to grab a 6 core 3600 which is achievable for almost half the cost and then look to upgrade to a 8-core 4000-series CPU (or a 6 core Zen 3 variant) when released in 2020 for a more meaningful performance boost. The difference between 3600 and 3700X is additional compute throughput for multi-threaded workloads (with 2 additional cores on the 3700X) with nothing to gain with single thread clockspeeds. In other words, both chips deliver parallel performance in gaming and the little gains achieved with the 3700X in some titles are not enough to warrant an additional $115 (IMO). Zen 3 4000-series on the other hand is expected to deliver a 15%+ single threaded clockspeed gains, better efficiency + improved optimisations with scaled multiple/all-core boosts. Even better, the 3600 chip is extremely likely to maintain excellent re-sale value - either a reasonably 20-25% reduction for a used asset or since CPUs are treated like gold possibly a $140-$150+ selling point (purely speculatively speaking). If you can't be bothered with the upgrade possibilities, grab a 3700X as it does add long-term value.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good PC for 1440p 144 FPS gaming? ($2000 budget)"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

Superb build mate!!

The only thing i'd look to swap out is the NVME SSD. The 970 evo charges a heftier premium for it's nippier sequential read and write speeds + TLC Vnand (lower latency) + improved endurance. Problem is these features benefit enterprise level workloads (higher I/O operations) and sees very little to zero benefit for the general consumer/gamer. You're better off saving $50 by picking up a consumer-level fast NVME with the likes of: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/VXyqqs/silicon-power-a80-1-tb-m2-2280-nvme-solid-state-drive-su001tbp34a80m28ab or something a little better with lesser latency https://pcpartpicker.com/product/VXyqqs/silicon-power-a80-1-tb-m2-2280-nvme-solid-state-drive-su001tbp34a80m28ab (although in real-world perceivable performance you can't tell the difference).

OPTIONAL

  • If opting for the 3700X you might fancy opting for a $50'ish aftermarket cooler for a marginally higher and better sustained boost clock performance + quieter operations.

  • Another option being, grabbing a 6-core Ryzen 3600 and upgrading later to a faster single threaded 8-core 4000-series CPU (expected in the last quarter of 2020). This upgrade possibility is confirmed on the X570 chipset. For 1440p gaming, the performance difference between a 3600 and 3700X is tiny and completely negligible in real-world perceivable gameplay (we're literally talking about an average of 1-3fps). If you don't intend on upgrading on the same platform, grab the 3700X and run with a B450 MAX tomahawk mobo ($120).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Warranties for Parts List?"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

Ah thats a bugger! I just checked availability for a bunch of 2070 super cards and they're are out of stock. The ones available are overpriced.

I guess this leaves you with 2 options, either:

  1. wait until the RTX 2070 SUPER is back in stock at it's reasonable asking price (although not sure when the recently surged demand will be met)

  2. if required immediately, possibly grab a 2060 super for $409 https://pcpartpicker.com/product/MRRgXL/asus-geforce-rtx-2060-super-8-gb-dual-evo-oc-v2-video-card-dual-rtx2060s-o8g-evo-v2

  3. Akin to No. 2, the alternative being a RX 5700 XT from AMD which does see a 7-9% performance gain over the RTX 2060 SUPER. The downer being, earlier reports of poorer game driver support is a concern although some/most of the discrepancies have been ironed out with newer driver updates. If going the AMD route it would be a good idea to check if other users are experiencing any problems with your select game titles (put it this way - where it works flawlessly it's a superb GPU option).

  4. or, grab something affordably "moderate" for now for 1080p 60fps+ gaming with the likes of GTX 1660 SUPER and look for an earlier upgrade with Nvidias 3000-series GPUs which are speculated to improve performance by a wider margin (30%+, or some rumours suggesting 40-50%). 3000 desktop series CPUs are estimated to launch in 2020 - although no concrete confirmation from Nvidias (yet).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Warranties for Parts List?"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

It's all good! Both the quality driven PSU and Mobo are perfect for the task. The X570 mobo also carries a forward upgrade path to 4000-series CPUs hence I wouldn't have had it any other way!

As for the rest of the build:

A couple of changes:

  • NVME SSD swapped for a $70 less ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB. For your purpose of use, this unit delivers parallel performance when compared with a 970.

  • Only $25 more for a RTX 2070 SUPER graphics card (achieves around 10-15% improved performance)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $409.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard Purchased For $0.00
Memory G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $178.99 @ Newegg
Storage ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $149.97 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Best Buy
Case Cooler Master MasterCase H500 ATX Mid Tower Case -
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 1000 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply Purchased For $0.00
Monitor Asus VG279Q 27.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $299.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1538.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-16 15:39 EDT-0400

Other possibilities

  • COOLER: Preferably an aftermarket cooler as the 3900X does run hot with the stock cooler and falls a little short of it's boost potential. If you're budget tight, stick with the stock cooler for now as you can always upgrade later.

  • DISPLAY: For graphics design + gaming you might appreciate upgrading to a sharper image 1440p display. Or in the least, drop down to a 23-24" 1080p panel as 27" does soften up the pixel density at a wider spread (losing image sharpness). If your budget is capable of achieving a 1440p "IPS" panel, consider this one: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/pGqBD3/asus-tuf-gaming-vg27aq-270-2560x1440-165-hz-monitor-vg27aq (GSYNC compatible). The higher resolution 1440p panel does see some performance hits on the gaming side but with a RTX 2070 SUPER in the bag it easily manages 100fps in demanding games on top settings. Lesser graphically intense games or a mix of quality configs easily achieves ~144fps (depending on game type/settings).

  • CASE: The selected case is out of stock unless you can locate one elsewhere. Alternative options: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FCK2FT/be-quiet-pure-base-500dx-atx-mid-tower-case-bgw37 (new from BQ and includes x3 140mm fans + improved air intake with the front mesh) or if you prefer a case with visible RGB fans (quality ones at that) for a little extra: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/K6848d/corsair-icue-465x-rgb-atx-mid-tower-case-cc-9011188-ww ....other options: Fractal Design Meshify C / Phanteks P400A (excellent case options for superior airflow)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Warranties for Parts List?"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Point-of-sale added cover plans are extended warranties which are optional - you don't need to purchase these as the manufacturer already has you covered with a minimum of 1 year (depending on the part, 1-3 years on the avg).

do you all buy all of the warranties for your parts?

I haven't purchased any extended warranties in the last 15 years, although it's not a bad idea if you're investing in an expensive part (esp. if the warranty period for a splurged spend is 1-2 years).


About the build:

$474 for a 2060 super is super priceyy. Add $25 more and grab a RTX 2070 SUPER.

For this sort of build, a 650W supply is super abundant with plenty of headroom for upgrades. Something classy (quality-driven) for just over $100: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/WxL48d/corsair-rm-2019-650-w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020194-na

If you don't mind me asking (assuming you haven't purchased any of the parts), whats the build for (gaming, streaming, editing, rendering, etc)?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any problems with this build?"

  • 16 days ago
  • 2 points

Looks good but no SSD? You'll want one for the primary system drive for a more snappier/responsive end product.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How would you improve this list? ($1000-$1200 budget)"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

I believe the ultra variant which achieves a 4% factory overclock above the standard KO model is sold out. Personally I'd save the $20 and grab the standard KO model and overclock it manually for a 4-5% increase in boost clock performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How would you improve this list? ($1000-$1200 budget)"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

That just leaves the graphics card. Is there really no saving grace to the 5600 XT? I was hoping that paying 30 dollars would translate to performance closer to a 2060, is that just wishful thinking?

Yes, the 5600 XT does closely compete and trails the RTX 2060 by a 2-4% margin. Problem being, for $20 more you can grab a RTX 2060 which also adds ray tracing to the package + improved driver optimisations across the board. AMD's smashed it at the CPU level but remains a little inferior at the GPU end of the market (at the code level). If your desired games are showing flawless compatibility (from user feedback) the 5600 XT remains a worthy contender, otherwise the RTX card just adds a nice punch of confidence going forward.

If you're comfortable going a little north of $1000 (incl. the cost of PSU + aftermarket cooler - both added) you can comfortably grab a RTX 2060. No price was shown for the PSU in the above list hence i've opted for a more affordable "semi-modular" equally respectable unit. Total comes to $1032

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $38.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $189.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $83.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $299.99 @ Newegg
Case be quiet! Pure Base 500DX ATX Mid Tower Case $99.90 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1032.83
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-15 21:15 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How would you improve this list? ($1000-$1200 budget)"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Almost forget (left the tab open to add)

This NVME SSD for $10 less: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/G9XYcf/crucial-p2-500-gb-m2-2280-nvme-solid-state-drive-ct500p2ssd8 (Crucial P1 was already trading blows with the 660p from intel - P2 was recently released with improved sequential read speeds)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How would you improve this list? ($1000-$1200 budget)"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Memory is 3200 C-14. I tried my best to wrap my head around all the different combinations of frequency and timings, but it's a way too much for me. After taking GN's video on ram at face value, I ended up with two options: 3600 C16 vs 3200 C14. This might not be worth the 30 dollar premium, so I'm open to switching to some cheaper modules like these. (3200 C16)

"Higher bandwidth" 3600Mhz 16CL fares better with Ryzen memory bandwidth hungry CPUs. The performance gains achieved over 3200Mhz 14CL is somewhere in the ranks of 0.5-2% (depending on game type) which translates to 1-3fps gain. I usually don't bother recommending these marginal performance advantages for gaming as the taxed premium on top is usually hefty but in this instance the following kit costs only $83: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/jBZzK8/gskill-ripjaws-v-16-gb-2-x-8-gb-ddr4-3600-memory-f4-3600c16d-16gvkc

Graphics card was the hardest choice. I went with the Sapphire Pulse, which is apparently the best RX 5600 XT, right beside the Gigabyte OC. My other option was the 1660 super. Any users of either that can weigh in? Spending a bit more to go for the 2060 super seems a bit much for my needs...the most graphics-intensive game I play is Civ 6, so as long as it can run that at max settings I'm good. 1440p gaming is interesting, but unfortunately I don't have a monitor that can take advantage of that, so it's a moot point for now.

If you're running a higher refresh rate (144hz) 1080p display, the RTX 2060 carries a nice +100fps return in demanding games on top settings + Ray tracing. Although if you're sticking with the more CPU-bound CIV 6 the GTX 1660 SUPER is "plenty" and should further easily manage 1440p @ 60fps+

Nvidia card seems like the more desirable approach as AMD cards continue to show poorer driver support for a bunch of games.

Other suggestions:

p.s. nice case choice!! I'm looking to grab one sometime soon (just gotta find an excuse to build something first)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Trying to build a cpu! question?"

  • 17 days ago
  • 2 points

If you have the b350m bazooka already - yes it's compatible but you will require a previous Gen CPU to initiate a BIOS update prior to installing a 3000-series CPU.

If purchasing new, grab a MSI B450 "MAX" motherboard which supports a larger BIOS chip with greater potential to accommodate 3rd Gen Ryzen forward-optimisations. These MAX B450's don't require BIOS updates and will run with the 3600X out of the box.

B450 MAX Micro-ATX options: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/h7WBD3,kRTzK8,6d9tt6,Nh2bt6/

If your case supports full ATX boards: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/jcYQzy,XJbCmG,BHBhP6,CXvqqs/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU to use for my PC"

  • 18 days ago
  • 2 points

Just a breeze over $900

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 1600 (12nm) 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor $165.00 @ Umart
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $139.00 @ Computer Alliance
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $112.24 @ Amazon Australia
Storage Crucial P1 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.00 @ Shopping Express
Video Card XFX Radeon RX 570 4 GB RS XXX Video Card $224.50 @ Amazon Australia
Case Thermaltake Versa H18 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $59.00 @ BudgetPC
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $105.00 @ Shopping Express
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $903.74
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-15 08:01 AEST+1000
  • The Ryzen 1600 AF (12nm) is a newer CPU opposed to the older 1600 model with performance only marginally trailing the 2600. With your budget limits, it's the best possible solution with a 6-core/12-threaded payload. You'll want a minimum of 12 threads for gaming and streaming.

  • Also opted for a "MAX" series of the B450 motherboard. MAX variants offer a more consistent upgrade path to 3rd Gen Ryzen CPUs (if you fancy upgrading at a later date). There's also possibility for MSI to roll out BIOS updates in support of 4th Gen CPUs which are expected towards the end of the 2020 (to clarify, there's no mention of support for 4th Gen on B450 MAX but it is a possibility going forward).

  • RX 570 is now more of an above entry level gaming card but good enough to get the job done! Unfortunately even marginally better performing cards end up charging way higher premiums hence considering the budget confines the RX 570 is a road-worthy contender. All the mentioned games will run smoothly, only Destiny being a little graphic-resource hungry might struggle to achieve higher FPS at higher game quality configurations.

PERFORMANCE-WISE:

GAME ONLY: The above build is capable of achieving 120fps with high/ultra settings with some of the lesser demanding games mentioned. In the more demanding listed titles this is also possible but you'll be forced to adopt low/medium settings. IMO, anything above 90fps-100 @ 1080p is highly satisfying hence I wouldn't concern yourself too much with 120fps.

WITH STREAMING IN THE MIX: You're looking at a drop of 20%+ performance hit on the gaming FPS side of things (loosely estimated). Either way, for $900 AUD even if you achieve 60-80fps whilst simultaneously streaming with desirable in-game quality configurations you've got yourself a solid build for the spend!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can you please help me with Video Editing Build"

  • 18 days ago
  • 1 point

didnt hear about the 4000x, any idea what's the difference from 3900x?

Ryzen 2nd Gen (2000 series): .... 2600...2600X.... 2700X... etx

Ryzen 3rd Gen (3000 series): ... 3600...3600X...3700X...3900X..etc

Now we're expecting Ryzen 4th gen (4000 series): ....4600...4700X....4900X...etc (assuming AMD will stick with the same naming scheme).

Each generation of CPUs above the previous sees better efficiency, higher IPC (faster single threaded performance) and a bunch of other optimisations for improved/sustained performance across the cores/threads (etc). 4000-series with the current pattern of generational improvements may see something around 12-15% better performance across the board - or better. AMD has officially announced 4000-series compatibility with the current X570 motherboard hence a potential upgrade path if you opt for a 3700X.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU to use for my PC"

  • 18 days ago
  • 1 point

How much are you looking to spend?

Your game performance goals are widely dependent on the graphics card side of things. What are you currently running or intending on purchasing?

If you're looking to secure a build from scratch - it would be easier to view your current parts list and take things from there. Or, a total budget (including peripherals/OS/etc - if required).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "($1100) Intel Vs Amd"

  • 18 days ago
  • 3 points

Which dollar currency (USD/CAD/AUD/etc)?

Does the build include peripherals (display/keyboard/mouse/etc)?

Operating system required (Windows)?

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