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Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Welcome - RAM and GPU"

  • 1 day ago
  • 2 points

with the plan to go 4k 144hz in the near future.

If the "near future" is closer to 6-12+ months, grab a GPU which compliments 1080p 144hz gaming (RX 2070 SUPER for $500) and wait for RTX 3000 GPUs which are expected in mid-2020 to compliment higher refresh rate 4K gaming. Gaming cards are already quite expensive and anything above the RTX 2070 SUPER is more inclining towards "bad value".

For eg.

  • The 2070 SUPER is rivalled by a 10-15% performance margin with a 2080 SUPER with a whopping $200 premium on top.

  • The 2080 SUPER is rivalled by a 15-25% performance margin with a 2080 TI with a MAMMOTH $400-$450 premium. Keep in mind, the higher performance gain here is only reflective in higher resolution gaming and not @ 1080p 144hz which sees 10-15% gains only.

The problem being if you're planning on jumping on 4K with immediate effect there is that compromise of harnessing a very high quality and pixel dense display at the expense of FPS performance. Whether it's a 2080 TI or a supposed faster functioning 3080 TI, 144fps is already a very tough ask if you're targeting demanding games on top settings. For some sort of balance at this RES, the RTX 2080 TI (or waiting for 3000-series) definitely makes sense but in my personal opinion 4K is over-rated, costly and horribly fails to impress if the user is demanding equally effectual performance with higher FPS counts (although achievable via lower in-game presets which defeats the higher quality pixel-rich enthusiasm).

A finer solution for a dedicated gaming panel is 1440p 144hz which secures 1. sharp and immersive HI-RES image quality 2. Higher FPS fluidity ~144fps. Essentially a perfect balance between 1080p/4K and delivers 55% better performance (FPS) over 4K. Alternatively a 1440p ultra-widescreen which retains around 35-40% better performance over 4K.

I guess it's purely down to user-preference! Either best of both worlds with 1440p or a richer pixel dense 4K panel with a hefty performance compromise which also ends up being the lesser future-proof option (if you're growing gold in back garden I guess 4K is manageable with more consistent earlier upgrades to newer, bigger and better gaming cards).

What is the advantage of the KS vs the K on the i9?

There's a bunch of these ninja like codes with some meaningful variants:

  • i9-9900K - K-modifier = overclocking potential + integrated graphics

  • i9-9900KF - same as above, absent of integrated graphics + a negligible 0.5-1% core clockspeed performance gain

  • i9-9900KS - Simply a higher binned 9900K launched recently. The initial K-variant carries a baseclock speed of 3.6Ghz, the KS-variant pulls ahead at 4Ghz. The K-variants boost clock is capable of hitting 5Ghz across all cores but does waiver depending on how many cores are jam-packed/power/thermal conditions. The KS-variant scales to 5Ghz on all cores unconditionally providing adequate cooling is employed.

Essentially, the KS variant sees 2-3% performance gains in 1080p gaming. Possibly 0-2% gain at 1440p (depending on game type as higher res gaming is more GPU bound). But at 4K the performance disparity is eliminated or in the least a poorly optimised game may see some negligible returns.

Keep in mind @ 4K even a $329 Ryzen 3700X competes at an equal footing with the intel i9s. Higher resolution gaming is lesser effective per advancing single threaded clockspeeds as the shift in the power vacuum is more leaning on the GPU rendering engine. In some ways it makes sense grabbing a 3700X for less and opting for an over-priced RTX 2080 TI - I guess a value man's compensation without sacrificing performance. In fact i'd prefer the 3700X route to keep the doors open for Ryzen 4000 series upgrade possibilities (expected in 2020, on the same current AM4 socket).

Also any recommendations on RAM?

If you're sticking with intel, 3200Mhz 16CL is perfect. There are a handful of CPU-intense games which do benefit with faster frequencies and tighter timing controls but the performance disparity is too small to take any notice. Although 3600Mhz 17CL are available for as little as $10/$15 more. For AMD platforms, the faster the RAM the better; where 3600Mhz 17CL and it's affordability makes it a front runner. Or even 3600Mhz 16CL if it's reasonably priced per user discretion.

32GB in my opinion is overkill. In certain circumstances, it's plausible considering long-term shared resources/background processes can dump mem-intense workloads on the available capacity. Whether it's a lucrative future-proof investment is down to user workloads/running processes in conjunction with gaming but gaming alone doesn't show any signs of +16GIGS of MEM-resource utilisation. There are a couple of SIMS (eg. X-plane) which can post beyond 16GIGS (more-so randomly) but this is purely based on user asset configurations with vaster distance 3D render or object rendition (which is CPU/MEM-levied). If your wallet is heavy and desires a trim, 32GB is not a bad idea especially being RAM is more affordable today but not an absolute.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Build, Please give me some feedback and your opinion on possible substitutions!"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

With these types of performance targets I would look to close in on the max budget ceiling of $1200 with something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $72.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $95.99 @ B&H
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $64.98 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1133.99
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-20 14:02 EST-0500

NOTES:

  • The storage choice has no impact in game performance, but a preference for a larger 1TB NVME storage solution as these are much more affordable nowadays. Benefits being: faster transfer speeds, faster game load/in-game asset management times.

  • The RX 5700 XT GPU is not too far off either with a $50/$60 saving. Essentially a 8-10% lesser performing card but very capable in delivering 240fps+ in lesser demanding titles (fortnite/overwatch/etc) via a mix of low/medium/high configuration. More demanding games on lower/medium setting will easily shoot past 144fps+ to as much as 200-220fps (this depends entirely on the games played / in-game configurations / game environments as denser graphic detailing impacts the rendering engines output).

  • Faster 3600Mhz RAM as 3rd GEN Ryzen requires higher bandwidths/frequencies to tap into the chips rated boost clock ceiling.

  • Grabbed a $65 550W semi-mod PSU which is simply fit for the task (if you fancy saving some cash). Granted, the 650W fully mod RMX model is superb and throws in a plenty of additional headroom (if you don't mind paying another $30).

  • An airflow savvy decent case with tempered glass, good cable management layout, PSU shroud - generally all the perks a builder should look for!! Case options are purely down to user preference. In this type of price category ($70) the Phanteks P350X is a winner (amongst a few others) hence feel free to window-shop around.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Welcome - RAM and GPU"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Also, where am I going to notice a difference between the 9900K and the 9700K? I know the i7 does not have Hyper Threading, but what would that affect in my scenario usage? Usually, I will have my game up on one screen, with various other applications up on another.

Generally for gaming only, the 9700K is more than adequate and delivers on par with the 9900K. With streaming in the mix, you'll want to stick with 9900K with multi-threaded (HT) support enabled unless you're dedicating stream material (encoding) to the GPU's hardware encoder (NVENC). Essentially, the 8 additional threads in a HT environment (9900K) delivers around 25-30% added compute performance which compliments software encoding possibilities with lesser levy on gaming performance.

Alternatively, more cores/threads opens up greater versatility on the streaming side - this is possible with a Ryzen 3900X (12 cores). Essentially, a marginal performance deficit on the gaming side and a significant increase in compute resources on the encoding side (which also makes the better future-proofer).

These are the current GPU's I'm looking at:................................

GPU preference is purely down to user discretion with performance targets + spending power in mind. With a 2080 TI in the mix, i guess "cost" is the least of concerns here. What are you targeting in terms of display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 144hz)

Also if you fancy sticking with intel and don't plan on overclocking, you might want to consider the i9-9900KS.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Build, Please give me some feedback and your opinion on possible substitutions!"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

If possible, I'd like to get as close to 240 as I can with this budget

Are you referring to 240fps @1080p in games? If yes, this is possible in fortnite on "low" game settings BUT impossible with PUBG/MW. At lower resolutions (720p) these type of higher refresh rate targets are achievable (depending on game).

If you are desiring 144fps+ in a number of demanding games at the cost of game quality configurations you might fancy a faster single threaded 6-core Ryzen 3600 and a beefier RTX 2060 SUPER / RX 5700 / RX 5700 XT graphics card (or 2070 super if the budget permits).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st Build"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Looks great!!

Nice cooler choice. Only £20 is remarkable! I have the same cooler installed in my brothers gaming build and back then in 2017 (checking the purchased order) this unit was costing around 35 quid.

I know I shouldn't, why not non-modular, is it bad?

PSU modularity is a user preference for easier cable management and does not impact the units performance/quality. The BeQuiet SP9 is a decent unit for moderate workloads. Uses lower quality capacitors and falls short of the efficiency standard we are seeing on similarly priced models. For a higher spec gaming build + free-flowing 12v load regulation, the TXM model sees some major improvements (the EVGA G3 does the job too, only the fan runs a little louder for my personal liking). Might need to double check but from my understanding the SP9 also falls a little short on a couple of included cable length sizes which is a nuisance for mid/full tower builds.

With £70 more, how much better (not sure how you quantify this) is 1660Super than RX590?

The GTX 1660 SUPER sees a 12%-18% performance gain over the RX 590 (depending on game). Draws lesser power, dissipates lesser heat and runs quieter. If your set-up consists of 1080p gaming and locked at 60hz (max 60fps) - the RX 590 also makes sense. For this type of performance range the 590 is a credible choice if we can look past the lesser efficiency concerns, especially considering it's a trim of 70 quid which is a significant save. This ones down to all-round performance targets with a nice dose of cost-evaluated value preference.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What should I upgrade?"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Assuming this is targeting a higher RES 1440p "gaming build " the tangible upgrade path here would be getting better FPS returns in games. This is only achievable with a higher-end GPU. Since you've got a solid performing rig already and im sure you're already easily capitalising on 80-90fps+, I would wait a little longer for next GPUs from NVIDIA.

Current higher-end GPU's carry a large price tag but offer unjustified returns in performance which makes for a poor investment. Eg. a RTX 2080 SUPER deliver around 20fps more (average) but demands a $700 spend - which is madness for most but doable if you fancy lowering the wallet weight. A more meaningful performance gain would be the RTX 2080 TI but the cost again is rampant.

Nvidia is expected to launch their 3000-series RTX fire-power sometime in mid-2020. Fingers crossed the performance gains will be more lucrative hence a worthier upgrade approach.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bsod after startup"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

i have updated windows

How about the graphics driver?

If you've tinkered around with BIOS configs prior to the error message emergence, it would be a good idea to pull up BIOS and set all parameters to "default".

As informed previously, have you checked 'device manager'?

If you fancy putting on your detective cap you might want to view the Windows Event Logger to see if you can locate any system/application error. Essentially use the system as you would normally and each time it crashes note the date and time. Two or three of these timestamps will be enough. Then right click 'start' and open "Event Viewer". Under 'windows logs" view the "system" and "applications" logs. Locate the date and timing of each crash and see if there's a common culprit preceding each crash. You can search the EVENT CODE / error or warning report online for a remedy. It may sound a little complex but it's very straightforward - QUICK DEMO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6fP8bV5Pb4


If all goes to pants, at this point, if you haven't installed a ton of stuff already, it would be easier to just opt for a fresh install of windows to iron out OS-based possibilities. If the issue persists after a clean install, I would look to update BIOS + chipset drivers (from your board manufacturers website). If that doesn't work, in the least, the previous steps help to narrow down the search to firmware-2-hardware comms where storage/memory are the common offenders, amongst others.


Comment reply on Forum Topic "About to bite the bullet on first build, would like a second opinion on if everything is compatible"

  • 2 days ago
  • 2 points

Access denied! It's set on "private". Pop over to your saved list, hit "edit details" and from the left pane uncheck the private setting

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Review wanted :) Comments appreciated i7 9700 + 2080 Super"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Perhaps will upgrade to 64 GB later.

  • If it's just gaming and general productivity you don't need anything beyond 16GB. For intel anything between 2800-3200Mhz works a treat with 15/16 CAS latency. Higher frequencies do show signs of some FPS gains in CPU-intense titles but nothing significant enough to warrant a higher premium.

If you're not overclocking:

  • grab a more affordable $40/$50 beefier air cooler for exceptional performance + super quiet function.

  • a lesser expensive non-OC prone motherboard.

Other amendments:

  • The 970 EVO is a workstation class SSD where the abundant speeds come into play in only handful of specific workloads. The benefits for a gaming/Gen-productivity build are next to zero when compared with more affordable $100 consumer-level NVME SSD. Hence grab something more pertinent to the use-case.

  • Preferably an aftermarket GPU for an improved cooling solution and some light pre-engineered factory-OC. Generally for 1080p 144hz the RTX 2070 SUPER is the way to go but I guess with VR in the equation the beefier the card the better.

  • For this sort of build - 550W of power draw is sufficient. 650W is recommended for some added headroom (efficiency/upgrades/swap-over in the long run/etc). 750W is a little overkill but if achievable for not much on top, grab one! The benefit being it does come with some additional cables which may have some use later down the line (esp the 4-pin EPS connector, although not required on the current platform).

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $339.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler $44.49 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock Z390 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $149.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Flare X 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $63.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $95.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $739.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $94.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1529.43
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-19 11:17 EST-0500

By comparison, the above $1529 build will deliver the same performance as the initial $2000 make-up. Marginally better performance with the OC'd GPU. If you want to put these savings to use:

  • I guess a 9900KS is a possibility, especially if you end up targeting a 360mm RAD (which I believe was initially a preference based on aesthetics). The i9 is pricey for the job at hand and opens up a narrow lead of 6% performance gains + multi-threaded support for some added future proofing. Personally I'd stick with the above 9700K plan and look for an earlier upgrade plan 4-6 years.

  • "Depending on storage requirements", possibly a 2TB NVME SSD. For a gaming build something like this works an absolute treat: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/7MQG3C/intel-660p-series-2tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw020t8x1

  • No case?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2k to 3k (max) Budget"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

Back in the day this cooler required a separate AM4 bracket as the package only included an intel mount mechanism - something AMD was offering free of cost via support. Newer batches bundled in both AMD/INTEL compatible brackets. Unfortunately I couldn't find any mention in the Amazon listing of one being included which is is concerning as these units may belong to the previous stack.

  1. Check with seller if included

  2. If not, you can grab one for free from AMD support: http://thermalright.com/2017/02/21/thermalright-amd-am4-cpu-mount-upgrade/

Alternatively,

...equally fantastic cooler for $5 less and includes an AM4 bracket: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/8GBrxr/scythe-mugen-5-rev-b-512-cfm-cpu-cooler-scmg-5100

BTW - the 3900X already supports a stock wraith prism cooler which is pretty decent for the task. It runs surprisingly well but does sound-up at max loads. If interested, for a more in-depth comparative analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wzhh3zH9Hs The idea being you could always try it out and see how well it fares with your personal expectations. If undesired, you can easily swap it out for something beefier and quieter.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dyal system streaming with 2 2700x ?"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

If you're investing in a dedicated streaming build the idea is naturally to remove performance taxation on gaming on the primary. This is best achieved with a capture card as OBS NDI chews up compute resources on the primary gaming build. Not all games are made the same - some will see greater impact and others lesser. How much of an impact this solution has depends on your stream quality hence limitations apply.

A similar taxed environment in a gaming and streaming build is opting for a single platform and grabbing a NVENC-encode RTX turing card (2060 super/ 2070 super). Only 6-9% performance hit on gaming, works flawlessly @ 720p 60fps higher quality presets or smoothly with basic profiled 1080p 60fps. The MAJOR benefit being cost-effectiveness and efficiency per the single-build solution.


If you want to lift this sort of performance levies all-together and fancy a dedicated streaming rig, grab a capture card.

Assuming you're targeting higher quality 1080p 60fps streams, you certainly don't need a 2700X to pull it off. Even a Ryzen 2200G APU (absent of a dedicated GPU) is capable. Alternatively for some added muscle, a Ryzen 1600/2600/2600X offers plenty of headroom for higher-RES/higher quality-preset encoding possibilities + paired up with a $80-$90 lower profile GT 1030 graphics card (or a $40/$50 used option/unless you have something at hand already).

Since 4 cores are sufficient for mainstream streaming (720p/1080p), the third option being a 6-core intel i5 CPU with integrated graphics.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bsod after startup"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

The system exception error is usually a corrupt/outdated/missing/recognition driver issue.

Search "Device Manager" in the task-bar search field on the bottom left. Open and see if anything is marked with a compatibility warning.

When installing windows, was this done using a supplied media installation disk? Or was it a fresh install using MS installation media tools? Also after installation, have you attempted to update windows?

If you're using third party applications for peripherals or other external devices....you might want to uninstall them to narrow down the search. Or if this a fresh build with only windows installed the easiest and most convenient method would be a clean "Fresh Windows install" by creating your own USB installation media (using the MS Windows Media Creation Tool - an official Microsoft tool)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building pc"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

The link landing page hits a "permission denied" blank page with 2 custom build links. I'm assuming you're referring to the one housing a 3700X + RTX 2070 SUPER. If this is correct, it's a solid build for 1440p higher refresh rate gaming.

32GB RAM? Is this for gaming only?

If it's just gaming for around $1600, i'd do it a little different to maximise on performance. For eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $326.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Amazon
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $72.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $95.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $724.99 @ Newegg
Case Cougar Gemini S ATX Mid Tower Case $85.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $94.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1516.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-18 18:44 EST-0500

The emphasis being: RTX 2080 SUPER. 1440p is more GPU-bound territory, although not the best value for a 20-25% increase in FPS performance but certainly makes a meaningful impact in game performance whilst keeping the budget intact. You still get around $100 to secure some eye-candy....RGB RAM, etc. For the cooler try out the stock RGB wraith prism cooler for the time being and if it doesn't suit your fancy (audibly/aesthetically) you can always upgrade later.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st Build"

  • 3 days ago
  • 2 points

Assuming you're happy to up-scale with the suggested £1200 budget:

  • Grab a 3600X for £20 more. 2-3% faster + bundles in a better functioning stock cooler. Or stick with the 3600 and grab an aftermarket cooler with the likes of: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/HyTPxr/cooler-master-hyper-212-black-edition-420-cfm-cpu-cooler-rr-212s-20pk-r1

  • Grab a 3000 CPU series optimised motherboard which doesn't require BIOS updates to support the 3600/3600X. These are MSI offerings marked with "MAX".

  • Ryzen is RAM speed/bandwidth prone for best performance. 3600Mhz modules for only 9 quid more.

  • GPU: The RX-580 is now more edging towards a lower/entry level GPU for 1080p 60fps gaming. Granted, for lesser demanding titles it would be a perfect fit. If you want something with a little more flare to handle more modern demanding games on top settings, something like a GTX 1660 SUPER/TI fits the bill very nicely. Essentially, 25-35% increase in graphics performance or in a number of games up to 40-45% gains. In other words, you want something that will last longer with plenty of perf in the tank.

  • Other perks: A better quality case and more importantly you don't want to skimp on the PSU, as the mother-power-ship is key to a "confident" build.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor £205.98 @ Aria PC
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £89.99 @ Amazon UK
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory £68.06 @ More Computers
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £97.54 @ Amazon UK
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card £222.96 @ Box Limited
Case Thermaltake Versa J22 ATX Mid Tower Case £59.90 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £63.97 @ Amazon UK
Optical Drive Samsung SH-118CB/BEBE DVD/CD Drive £8.75 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £85.98 @ Aria PC
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £6.95 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £6.95 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £917.03
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-18 23:36 GMT+0000

If you are targeting higher refresh rate gaming (144hz) you still have plenty of room in the budget to accommodate a beefier GPU. This ones down to personal preference / specific performance targets. For the games you have mentioned the above spec is simply more than sufficient!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2k to 3k (max) Budget"

  • 3 days ago
  • 3 points

Plenty of cores/RAM and fast 2TB SSD makes x5-VM a doddle

Since the budget is "expansive", with a 144hz panel i've thrown in a RTX 2070 SUPER which suits up very nicely for 1080p higher refresh rate gaming. The GPU supports ray tracing + the display is G-SYNC compatible for smoother frame feeds.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $499.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Thermalright Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $179.99 @ Newegg
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $159.99 @ Corsair
Storage Corsair MP510 1.92 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $267.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $519.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $89.99 @ Walmart
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $119.89 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $98.99 @ Amazon
Monitor MSI Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $214.99 @ Adorama
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2201.71
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-18 16:25 EST-0500

If your VM-count grows in the long run, the current AM4 platform also supports the 16 core Ryzen 3950X and will be compatible with next GEN Ryzen 4000 CPUs. Personally I'd stick with the 3900X, save $800, and weigh-in the options when 4000-series hits the shelves in 2020 (subject to workload requirement).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2k to 3k (max) Budget"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

How many VM's are you planning on running at a time?

Operating system required?

Peripherals required? (display/keyboard/mouse/etc)

^ if yes to display, what are you targeting in terms of display resolution and refresh rate (eg. 1080p 144hz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Home Office PC Build (With Some Gaming)"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

If these are low-volume excel data sheets (not "huge" gigs of complex data calculations), general office use + gaming, you don't need anything above a Ryzen 3600 - a build achievable for $800

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $36.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Amazon
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $72.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $95.99 @ Amazon
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $94.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $98.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $799.99
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-18 15:41 EST-0500

If you don't mind spending more for some added future proofing (for gaming), there is the 8-core Ryzen 3700X. Or save the money and opt for an earlier upgrade path within a few years for a more aggressive performance gain.

....GTX 1070.... still a fantastic gaming card. Esp. @ 1080p - will handle anything your son throws at it (demanding games on top settings)!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hand rest"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Would i be able to get away without one or are they pretty much required?

I use or have used a whole host of different keyboard shapes and sizes, ultra thin units, bulky ones and mechanical sky-scraper keys and never had the need to opt for wrist support. In fact, when tried, it felt a little odd as i'm used to keying up without one.

Just grab a keyboard and test it out. Use something around the home to temporarily create your own wrist rest and see how much of a difference it makes. If it offers meaningful benefit/comfort, you can pick one up from Amazon for under 10 bucks.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hey everyone, was wondering if someone could look over my parts list"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm glad I could be of help.

Feel free to ask if you have any further queries.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hey everyone, was wondering if someone could look over my parts list"

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

For gaming only @ 1080p (or 1440p) 144hz + overclocking potential, the 9700K is perfect! Assuming your 6-year old laptop delivers desirable performance for 3D modelling, with certainty the 9700K will have you covered there. For 3D modelling, the RTX CARDs rendering engine will smash those workloads into pieces. Plenty of performance here!!

the Mobo I posted is a standard ATX as far as i can see though. Can you go into more detail about the how it might not be the best for overclocking and maybe recommend a better Mobo?

Thats so odd! I swear I saw a Micro-ATX MSI Z390M. Maybe got muddled up with another opened parts list.

I would also avoid the MSI Z390-A PRO. It's an entry level motherboard with a poorer VRM cooling solution and again will limit power address in 150w category. A decent board for overclocking should easily draw 200W of power without performance throttle with good quality mosfets and sufficient HS cooling.

For a moderately decent affordable overclocking solution, something like this: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/CdPKHx/gigabyte-z390-gaming-x-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-gaming-x

Otherwise a more robust solution to push the CPU to a more rewarding overclock - the following 2 will do. I currently have the Asrock Taichi which is simply brilliant in all respects. Not the best UI at the BIOS-level (least friendly) but very easy to get the hang of.

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/MVPKHx/gigabyte-z390-aorus-pro-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-aorus-pro

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/TnhKHx/asrock-z390-taichi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-taichi

edit: also can you explain a bit how the 2080 super is better than the 1080 ti? is it better to go for a faster GPU with a lower memory? How will the difference effect gaming?

There's a bunch of reasons you might fancy the 2080 super:

  1. Most plausibly "cost". Older generation hardware which performs at equal balance, if achieved more affordably, becomes a viable solution. For a $300 mark-up in cost with inferior performance, simply put it's a rip-off. For this sort of money you would be better-off targeting a RTX 2080 TI which sees 20-30% game performance or workload render gains. At this point the 1080 TI only makes sense if it's achievable for $40+ less below the RTX 2080 SUPERs asking price.

  2. Nvidias newer RTX cards deploy ray tracing as an added bonus. If you're a gamer and fancy those more realistic video lit-up environments "ray tracing" would be a difficult one to pass-up. At the moment only a few select games support RT, others are lining up and the future is geared up on the ray-traced path.

  3. RTX cards employ "faster GDDR6" VRAM which compensates the drop from 11GB. The 1080 TI remains on GDDR5. Only a handful of poorly optimised games may fancy higher memory bandwidths but only see a few FPS gains (a negligible return). Whereas in general the RTX 2080 SUPER sees a 5%-15% gain in gaming performance which is vastly significant considering it's the newer and relatively the more affordable GPU. Later RTX code optimisations capped the performance bar higher hence older benchmarks may be misleading as the RTX card is shown in various screens as only favouring a 3%-10% performance lead. If you are intending on viewing online benchmarks make sure to search "2080 super" which is the revised variant from the initial "2080" standard model.

  4. Simply put, it's the better and newer GPU.

BTW - if the budget isn't of concern and you simply want the best gaming GPU for higher resolution gaming (1440p/4K), there is the rather expensive RTX 2080 TI option. Personally i'd avoid it and grab the 2080 Super and look for an earlier upgrade path in a few years (or earlier as GPU's maintain decent re-sale value) for a more robust performance-savvy newer GEN card (eg. RTX 3000 GPUs are expected in 2020)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 3950X builds?"

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

You said it yourself "if the scheduler is optimized". Oddly enough it is already, whether it leans purely on AMD requirements or not is another question all-together.

If you're scaling across all cores you're not going to see those performance advantages in single threaded workloads. If you're purchasing the 3950X to enjoy single threaded performance across a single or a handful of cores to profit with comparable performance then it makes the higher-core count endeavour pointless in the first place, unless other workloads are willing to make compromises.

The 3950X has the highest single core performance.

This can be rather misleading for the buyer. It would help if you can distinguish where these performance recompenses take shape and form (type of workloads, etc). More-so, after the OP responds with the entailed purpose of use. In general, the single threaded supremacy continues to sit at the intel camp. In general, games see a clear advantage with a 9700K/9900K/9900KS - again the single threaded rise of the brawnier, which would beg for a statement revision.

No. But you clearly haven’t watched the reviews if you think you’ll LOSE performance by buying this CPU.

You're taking matters out of context - but then again you are the "reluctant" geek lol

No-one is suggesting "LOSS" but a mere mention of higher core count utilisation taxing single threaded performance is a GIVEN and we don't need synthetic benchmarks to confirm otherwise as system architectures do not change over-night on the same platform. Granted, better fab/binning practices, more cores, greater clockspeeds, optimised code, etc puts newer generational processing power at a more robust frontier but CCX fill/share/enabler latencies remain and tapping into 2-3-4 CCX's (etc) is already "officially" confirmed to tax core ST's (some more heavily then others).

We should focus on the OPs requirement first as I don't fancy firing blank shots or form pathways which are non-aligned with the requirement.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 3950X builds?"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

With all the hype and positive video reviews I've seen on the upcoming Ryzen 3950X, I'm surprised to not see more threads or builds planned around the next big thing coming from AMD

A vast majority of relative discussion points or necessitated recommendations are usually focused on gaming builds or other lesser or similar arranged requirements. For these types of builds, the 3900X and 3950X are pointless. Gaming or basic build requirements adequately sit on 4-8 core modern day CPUs hence more emphasis will be shown towards Ryzen 2nd/3rd GEN CPUs or intel 8000/9000-series.

The oodling higher core-count (3950X) market share is smaller and better targeted by specific workflows which are capable of scaling across these number of cores or multi-threaded yields. The 12 core 3900X does desirably pop up occasionally at the consumer-end with the growing demands of gamers and streamers. These sort of simultaneous workloads are becoming more popular amongst gamers and likewise benefit with higher core count options. Keep in mind, the higher the core count the greater the performance hit on single threaded performance (latency). Various workloads are less inclined to more cores but will favour higher single threaded speeds (eg. gaming, various editing tools, general compute environments, design and modelling, etc).

I'm hoping to get some BF discounts on other parts of my build but is the 3950X actually going to be available to buy?

ONLY consider the 3950X if your workload is capable of saturating this type of performance otherwise you'll just end up being a 16-seat bus driver with 8-12 unoccupied seats (if that makes sense).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hey everyone, was wondering if someone could look over my parts list"

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

Air coolers (which are technically liquid cooled) present zero cause for concern and function just as good as liquid AIO coolers. The only hurdle being "case compatibility" which isn't a problem with the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M. If interested, the D15 is now also available in black: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/84MTwP/noctua-nh-d15-chromaxblack-8252-cfm-cpu-cooler-nh-d15-chromaxblack

The selected cooler suggests you're planning on overclocking the CPU. For this purpose the Z390M motherboard from MSI makes for a poor selection and only moderately scales with overclocking. Also, you've got a standard sized ATX case and a MICRO-ATX motherboard. Although compatible, the shorter board sits higher up on the cases's back-wall which exposes attached cables at the bottom and just makes things a little less attractive through the glass panel.

You'll want to look past the 1000-series GPUs from NVIDIA for their newer GEN RTX 2000-SERIES cards. The 1080 TI is overpriced whereby the RTX 2080 SUPER (same performance) is achievable for around $900-$1000 CAD

A better quality PSU would be in order too.


If desired, for an amended parts list help us with the following:

  1. Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

  2. If gaming, what display resolution and refresh rate are you targeting? (eg. 1080p 144hz)

  3. Are you planning on overclocking?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Final Build List Suggestions"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Any last things I should consider?

Depends on the user requirement. A little more info would help.

From the outset this looks like a formidable machine but if it's just gaming you're overloading excessively.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I want to upgrade my GPU, CPU and motherboard for high end gaming."

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

The 4-core 7700K belongs to a previous GEN family and you'll want something newer, faster and for gaming preferably a 6 or 8 core CPU.

The RTX 2080 standard is beaten by the newer revised RTX 2080 "SUPER" variant. More affordable and faster.

If going the intel route, something like this:

Keep in mind, although it's a beefier cooler the motherboard selection scales moderately with overclocking. If overclocking is of interest upgrade to the AsRock Taichi higher tier motherboard (or similar) and there are a couple of $80-$90 cooler options which deliver a little better performance for OC. If sticking with stock conditions, the selection of parts below are more than sufficient.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $359.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler $48.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock Z390 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $149.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $0.00
Storage Seagate Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $0.00
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $724.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT S340 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $0.00
Wireless Network Adapter Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I PCIe x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter $0.00
Monitor Asus TUF Gaming VG27AQ 27.0" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor $426.09 @ Amazon
Keyboard Cooler Master CM Storm Devastator Gaming Bundle Wired Gaming Keyboard With Optical Mouse $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1770.04
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-17 12:34 EST-0500

The Alternative - AMD route:

At 1440p games are more GPU bound whereby current AMD Ryzen 3000 CPU options deliver comparable performance. The AMD AM4 socket also sees an upgrade path in 2020 with 4000-series CPUs and current options with the likes of the 3700X enables multi-threaded support for some added future-proofing.

Stuck with the stock cooler which comes with the 3700X - great piece of kit. You can always upgrade the cooler later if it doesn't suit your fancy.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $326.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $0.00
Storage Seagate Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $0.00
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $724.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT S340 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $0.00
Wireless Network Adapter Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I PCIe x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter $0.00
Monitor Asus TUF Gaming VG27AQ 27.0" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor $426.09 @ Amazon
Keyboard Cooler Master CM Storm Devastator Gaming Bundle Wired Gaming Keyboard With Optical Mouse $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1668.04
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-17 12:45 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with the cpu and graphics card?"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Preferably a RTX TURING card for hardware encoded streams to free up CPU resources. This will deliver lesser performance impact on the gaming side. The RTX 2060 SUPER will be your best bet to secure 240fps on low settings (whilst streaming). The Ryzen 3600 is more than adequate to meet these demands

How much of an impact will multi-tasked workloads have on game performance is anyone's guess hence the following 2 options:

OPTION 1: A foot through the door - BEST VALUE:

  • CPU: Ryzen 3600 / 3600X

  • GPU: RTX 2060 SUPER

OPTION 2: If the budget is expansive - A LITTLE PRICIER:

  • CPU: Intel i7-9700K. Faster single threaded CPU which gains favour in FPS performance + overclocking headroom if that's something you're looking to grapple with.

  • GPU: RTX 2070 SUPER (should permit 240fps @ medium/high settings or just adds some additional headroom to compensate hardware encoded stream FPS deficits)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First gaming + streaming build"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

For a beginner this is a "pretty fine" selection of parts and relevantly on par with the build requirement.

A nit-picker: I'd drop the aftermarket cooler as the 3700X bundles in a pretty decent wraith prism cooler (incl. RGB) and double up on NVME storage @ 1TB. Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $326.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Gigabyte X570 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard $199.00 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $113.97 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $89.99 @ Walmart
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1404.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-16 18:12 EST-0500

For gaming, streaming and video render, you don't need a 970 evo as these types of workloads are least likely to saturate the drives sequential R/W speeds. These enterprise edition storage units are better aimed at specific workstation class builds which are more susceptible to IOPs-savvy workloads.

Other than the above, the build arrangement looks SOLID!!

P.S. If you see yourself sticking with an 8 core CPU without upgrading to higher core count alternatives on the same platform, i'd grab a more affordable MSI B450 Tomahawk MAX for around $120. This board is fully compatible with Ryzen 3000 series CPUs hence no BIOS update required.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "***CHALLENGE*** Micro ATX"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Is this one of those special compos where you select a winner and purchase all the parts, build the machine and send it over in pink satin wrapping? If yes, can i add a Windows license too lol (i could do with some heavy-bass speakers too)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PSU Suggestions?"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Fully modular + gold certified + great efficiency record + flat cables for easier cable routing: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Ky4NnQ/fsp-group-power-supply-hg650

If you want to save money, this "marginally" lesser efficient + semi-mod unit handles anything you throw at it without any hiccups: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/R2mxFT/corsair-power-supply-cp9020103na

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i5-6500 vs i5 9400"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Besides that, the 9400 is cheaper but why?

I take it this is where things get a little mystifying and has you a little puzzled.

Older GEN CPUs (esp. intel) tend to maintain their MSRP price banding opposed to dropping in value when newer, better optimised and faster generational CPUs enter the market. The drop in price for older tech would be considered the natural course of action but the market dynamic or pre-engineered entrapment sees very little shift in price or value. Even the used market is influenced in the same manner which is a shame. Quite repulsively, some of these older CPU offerings also throw in an added premium as if it's ageing wine with taxable maturity - shame x2.

The 9400 is vastly better - a current generational CPU securing nippier single threaded performance (20-25%) and vastly superior multi-core performance (70-80%+)

Depending on cost/requirement, you might prefer the comparable Ryzen 2600X (multi-thread enabled) or if there is wiggle room in the budget the superior performing Ryzen 3600.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The motherboard M.2 slot #1 shares bandwidth with a SATA 6.0 Gb/s port. When the M.2 slot is populated, one SATA 6.0 Gb/s port is disabled."

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard M.2 slot #1 shares bandwidth with a SATA 6.0 Gb/s port. When the M.2 slot is populated, one SATA 6.0 Gb/s port is disabled.

This is totally normal and "affecting my build badly...." doesn't even come into the equation.

Your build consists of a Samsung 970 evo NVME SSD. This device slots onto the motherboards M.2 slot. The M.2 slot shares the same lanes as one/two SATA ports. Hence, when slotting in your Samsung NVME SSD, one or two of the SATA ports will be disabled (normal).

Your motherboard has 6 SATA ports hence losing 1/2 isn't a problem unless you were planning on utilising all 6 slots in the long run (unlikely for the vast majority). All you need to do is refer to the motherboards manual and see which SATA ports are disabled and then avoid them when adding additional SATA devices.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "£2000 Gaming build"

  • 12 days ago
  • 2 points

Since no mention was made in reference to peripherals, i'm assuming this request is purely for the MAGIC BOX + OS:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor £535.78 @ Newegg UK
CPU Cooler Thermalright Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler £53.16 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI X570-A PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard £150.00 @ CCL Computers
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £119.99 @ Overclockers.co.uk
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £97.49 @ Amazon UK
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card £728.99 @ CCL Computers
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case £111.71 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £115.40 @ Alza
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £83.00 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £6.95 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £6.95 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £2009.42
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 22:11 GMT+0000

NOTES:

  • For 1080p higher refresh rate gaming don't bother with the RTX 2080 SUPER. Grab a RX 5700 XT / RTX 2070 SUPER. Higher end cards are a better fit for higher resolution panels. For 1080p the performance advantage is just not enough to warrant a large spend for a higher end card (in other words: bad value unless user enthusiasm suggests otherwise)

  • The 3900X CPU delivers 12 cores which streamlines gaming and streaming simultaneous workloads without any limitations at the encoding end. The impact on gaming performance is not all that bad with these newer 3rd GEN CPUs. Or you could save money and grab a very capable 3600/3700X and place the encoding workload on the GPUs dedicated hardware encoder. As a result this will have a lesser impact on game performance, is capable of streaming @ 1080p 60fps but can be limiting in scaling higher for finer quality streams (or higher bitrates).

  • If you have a spare machine laying around, you might prefer the option of throwing in a capture card and running 2-build solution to eliminate performance hits on the gaming side. For streaming a decently performing 4-core chip is more than sufficient for excellent quality 1080p 60fps streams.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking to upgrade, hows it looking?"

  • 12 days ago
  • 1 point

Looks good!

What are you targeting for the gaming resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 60hz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking to upgrade, hows it looking?"

  • 12 days ago
  • 1 point

Looking to upgrade, hows it looking?

It's looking "locked" and "mysterious". Uncheck "private" :)

Also it would help to know a little more about the build requirement (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with a MOBO"

  • 13 days ago
  • 1 point

For a Micro-ATX, try locating this one: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/h7WBD3/msi-b450m-mortar-max-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-mortar-max

Otherwise: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/kRTzK8/msi-b450m-pro-vdh-max-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-pro-vdh-max

These recently made available "max" variants are Ryzen 3000-ready and do not require BIOS updates.

For WIFI either pair up the above 2 options with a WIFI PCIe card or grab a 2nd GEN MSI B450 with integrated wifi and as you suggested follow through with the CPU-less FLASH update process.

Personally I'd stick with the MAX variant with a dedicated WIFI card as it houses a larger BIOS chip, unlocks all features and is better destined to support further optimisations with improved perf + a more well-suited platform for Ryzen 4000 upgrade potential (future proofing).


If you're targeting a 32" panel for a close up desk display (assuming you're sitting at an arms length or a little more), consider a 1440p 60hz screen. 1080p @ 32" loses it's pixel dense structure being it's forced wider which ends up losing some of that sharper image quality. Very noticeable up-front, lesser noticeable a little away and flawless at a distance - hence it's down to your viewable distance.

I've gone through a bunch of these panels with various pixel densities and display sizes.

  • Generally for 1080p at arms reach, 22-24" work a treat.

  • 1440p sits fantastically @ 27-32" (the smaller the size the sharper the image but depending on workload the variable here won't matter)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build"

  • 13 days ago
  • 2 points

Are you serious about this build?

I mean for strictly gaming the following doesn't make sense:

  • 12 core Ryzen 3900X

  • 64GB RAM - only 16GB is required

  • A super expensive overclockers paradise of a motherboard with an entry level older CPU cooler

  • Dual-GPU config which is not recommended for gaming (sees very poor support/inconsistencies/crashes)


If you are serious about the build requirement. There's a bunch of things to amend and you'll be better off with a single RTX 2070 SUPER if you're targeting 1080p 144hz gaming. At this resolution, preferably the i7-9700K for it's superior single threaded performance and gaming FPS gains. Or push up on the sharper image 1440p variant and grab a RTX 2080 SUPER (or, not the best best value but the best gaming card currently available: RTX 2080 TI). At 1440p the Ryzen 3700X delivers plenty of future-proof performance and the 3900X will most likely sit idly beyond 8-core utilisation.

If you want to splash out regardless of cost for the best performance possible @ 1440p with "long-term" future-proofing in mind, you'd want to target something along these lines:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i9-9900KS 4 GHz 8-Core Processor $524.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $89.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock Z390 Taichi ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $199.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $84.99 @ Corsair
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $204.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB Black Video Card $1106.98 @ Newegg
Case Antec TORQUE ATX Mid Tower Case $356.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $119.89 @ Amazon
Monitor MSI Optix MAG27CQ 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $349.99 @ Newegg
Keyboard Corsair Vengeance K70 Wired Gaming Keyboard -
Mouse Redragon Mammoth Wired Laser Mouse $24.99 @ Amazon
Speakers Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 120 W 2.1 Channel Speakers $199.94 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3263.63
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-08 15:40 EST-0500

Or, the marginally inferior 3700X + X570 motherboard with higher bandwidth RAM combo, in hopes of achieving a faster upgrade path with Ryzen-4000 CPUs

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help setting up new monitor!"

  • 13 days ago
  • 1 point

The RX 570 should be able to achieve 60fps+ @ 1440p with a nice mix of medium/high in-game settings.

If you're seeing huge fluctuations in performance:

  1. Make sure the GPU driver is up-to-date + Windows updates

  2. EFT chews the living daylights out of CPU resources. You'll want to make sure your CPU is running optimally (achieving it's rated boost clock). The stock cooler is sufficient but you can untap some additional performance with a $30 aftermarket cooler. Also make sure you've enabled the memory XMP profile to shoot past the default 2133Mhz mem speed. The CPU's boost range is highly reflective of memory speed hence you'll want to make sure you're hitting the modules rated 3200Mhz frequency. Also make sure you have both memory sticks installed in the correct dimm slots to maximise memory bandwidth and lesser latency.

This part has me extremely confused because several times I have played so far in 1440p without issues and 50fps frame rate.

  1. When experiencing significant dips in performance, are you checking background processes (other running applications/services/etc) which may be a culprit?

Any suggestions would be welcome! I am also looking in to a new GPU, I want one that will have no issues with 1440p and 144hz refresh rate. Suggestions on that will be nice as well!

RX 5700 / RTX 2060 SUPER / RX 5700 XT / RTX 2070 SUPER are great cards for higher refresh rate gaming @ 1440p.

There are better options available but not the best of value (actually, more realistically put "way too expensive" unless the wallet is candidly indulgent).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I7-9700k vs I9-9900k"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

For strictly gaming, don't bother with a 9900K. The 9700K is "top notch".

What the 9900K does better is multi-threaded support, delivering about 35% added compute performance which is better targeted for optimised multi-threaded workloads.

Games don't necessarily see much benefit. Where applicable, there's just not enough performance gain to warrant the $120 asking price. Often there is talk of "better future proofing possibilities" which is true but in a similar time-line spending less and saving more for a quicker upgrade path puts those long-term investments to shame.

OR what is the best cpu for gaming? (Thinking about pairing it along with a RTX 2080 super)

If you're targeting a 2080 SUPER you're more likely to adopt a higher resolution display. Being HI-RES gaming is more GPU bound, and lesser CPU punishable, an AMD 3700X delivers parallel performance with the inclusion of MT support (matching the 9900K). Throws in an adequately performing stock cooler too, all-in-all for only $329. Value proposition at it's best!!

If the 2080 SUPER is aiming more towards maximising FPS on a 240hz 1080p panel - The 9700K's single threaded advantage has a noticeably better performance surplus (at stock + OC).

To simplify, if running at stock:

  • 1440p/4K: go with Ryzen 3600/3700X. Also opens up 4000-series Ryzen upgrade possibilities on the same platform.

  • 1080p: go with the 9700K.

  • If overclocking is part-n-parcel with the builds requirement, stick with intel

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Final Tweaks before I begin building this. Opinion?"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

Ah.... thats interesting! If you're planning on posting up the completed build, link me up!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Final Tweaks before I begin building this. Opinion?"

  • 15 days ago
  • 2 points

lol just looking back - wheres the case?

Not sure how on earth I missed the elephant sized envelope for all this fine and dandy hardware.

I think imma stick with a small SSD or maybe just go full SSD.

If you're looking to save money:

All-in-all, around $70 savings available or $100 if you short out on the SSD (for me the more SSD the better for the long run).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "*FULL UPGRADE BESIDES GPU* Upgrading the PC, would love opinions and help on what to get."

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

My thing is can my current AIO keep the 7700k cool during a stream @ 1080p 60FPS and running my games on a 2k screen while trying to go for the highest FPS possible?

easily achievable with the AIO

Problem being you don't want to stream on a 4-core hyperthreaded CPU as performance penalties will be greater on the gaming side.

As mentioned earlier, you can lift the burden off the CPU and use the GPU's dedicated hardware encoder for streaming purposes. This way, the CPU's resources will be directed towards gaming to achieve maximum performance (FPS) and overall you end up with much lesser performance penalties on the gaming side. If you're not familiar with GPU hardware encoding, look up "NVENC" by adding the associated streaming client in google or something. For eg, "how to enable nvenc in OBS".

I’m up for switching out my gaming monitor to the predator anyways and game at 1080p but I liked having the 2k monitor for MMORPG style games and such

Keep the 1440p panel. Your GPU is more than capable of achieving excellent performance at this resolution. TBH, since I went 1440p, now reverting back to 1080p eliminates some (or a lot) of the game visual-appeal which I'm relishing on my sharper image and immersive 1440p panel. If your performance targets are set very high, although 90-110fps for me is a perfect sweet-spot, i guess a 1080p res does achieve around 35% better performance at the cost of visual-quality/sharper imagery.

What do you have your OC’s at for your 7700k I’m completely new to overclocking too so I don’t wanna mess anything up.

I have a similar AIO cooler which easily manages 5Ghz @ stressed 82/83c and in more realistic work/gaming environments 78c max. Keep in mind OCing isn't going to reel in a massive performance boost as higher resolution gaming is lesser-CPU bound but since you already have a decent motherboard + higher end cooler, every bit of performance gain counts!!

Even at stock 4.5 Ghz boost, the 7700K is more than capable of hitting 100+ fps in demanding games on ultra settings (as much as 120-144fps in lesser demanding games or a fine-tuned mash up of lower and higher quality configurations without compromising any noticeable loss in visual quality).

If you're asking about the applied OC configuration in detail:

  • Core frequency: 50 (5Ghz)
  • Vcore: 1.328v
  • CPU cache: 4.6
  • CPU System Agent Voltage: 1.25
  • CPU VCCIO Voltage: 1.25

  • Cooler: Kraken X62

  • Mobo: ASUS Z270-E

Keep in mind, a friend of mine has the same board, the same CPU and a similar performing case and cooler but only manages 4.9Ghz. I had a crack at his rig too and got it to shoot up on 5Ghz which passed prime-95/realbench/aida 64 with flying colours. But for some odd reason, unlike any other game tried, GTA 5 kept crashing after 5-10mins of play (flat out BSOD). Ended up settling with 4.9Ghz. Point of the story - not all CPU's are made the same OR other variables at play can hinder the 5Ghz race.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Please"

  • 15 days ago
  • 2 points

1440 p is a goal.

Once you hit past 1080p, higher resolution gaming becomes lesser CPU contingent and more GPU bound. For 1440p, a Ryzen 3600 CPU + a stronger 5700 "XT" GPU combo delivers anywhere between 10-20fps more in games (or 15-17% better performance in general). I wouldn't bother with a 3700X at this point as it is merely a long-term future proofing option which doesn't exactly see the same performance gains compared to the 3600+5700-XT combo @ 1440p. Where a handful of modern day games are better optimised to make use of 8 cores, the performance gains are lesser significant compared to a higher-end GPU which sees noticeably improved performance.

I figure the 570 mb would be one in which would make upgrading GPU or CPU easier but I'm still getting update on the new tech that I've been oblivious to lately.

Unless you're considering 16 or 24 higher core count workstation-class CPUs (doesn't do anything for gaming) or require greater PCI 4.0 functionality for dual-GPU rendering (not recommended for gaming) the X570 would make sense. The expanded I/O functionality is pointless for the vast majority of users as standard consumer platforms are already abundant for mainstream use. Where the X570 may make sense is specialised work environments for multiple-GPU hardware accelerated rendering, or audio production systems which employ a ton of cores and specialised PCI peripherals/components, or any type of workflow which requires excessive cores

$1200 isn't an absolute max but I still need to buy a monitor, keyboard, and mouse. 144 monitor is a must so that's $200+.

Lets say $1200 for the rig, $200 for the panel + $50 for a decent set of MS/KB = $1450

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $36.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Team T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Gigabyte Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB GAMING OC Video Card $403.98 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $67.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $79.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $98.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Monitor VIOTEK GN27D 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $249.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon K561 VISNU Wired Gaming Keyboard $39.89 @ Amazon
Mouse Redragon COBRA M711 Wired Optical Mouse $19.82 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1457.68
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-06 15:10 EST-0500

Thats around $1150 for the build and $350 for the peripherals

Don't know if streaming or editing is in my future or not.

If you're serious about streaming and are able to up-the-budget by $100/$130, there's 2 options:

  • Grab the RTX 2070 SUPER which delivers excellent basic 1080p 60fps streams via it's dedicated hardware encoder. This option sees around 7-10% performance hit on the gaming side.

  • Or, grab the 3700X for CPU software encoding with 2 additional cores. This option sees around 10-15% performance hit on the gaming side, or as much as 20-30% depending on game type/stream quality configurations/or system processes.

At this point, i'd prefer the GPU upgrade as it runs more efficiently, draws lesser concern in game performance penalties and not forgetting the 2070 SUPER surpasses the 5700 XT with a 10-12% performance gain. Or in other words, compensates the game performance levy.

Feel free to weigh in your options in accordance to your budget and preference.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Final Tweaks before I begin building this. Opinion?"

  • 15 days ago
  • 2 points

I'm assuming this is primarily for gaming. You can do better within the $900 budget range.

Following adjustments made:

  • 12-15% faster Ryzen 3600 CPU

  • Better functioning aftermarket CPU cooler (cooler + quieter)

  • A newer revised Ryzen 3000 series compatible B450 motherboard (opens up greater upgrade potential for the long run)

  • Faster 16GB RAM. Take a single kit of 2 sticks for guaranteed consistency. 16GB is more than sufficient for gaming and for a whole host of other general use-case scenarios

  • Double up on the capacity and grab a faster NVME SSD. Place most-played gaming titles on the SSD and the rest of the games library on the HD. Benefit being: faster load times + faster in-game asset management

  • 12-15% faster 1660 SUPER card. The "Super" variants were released recently and match the performance of a 1660 TI whilst maintaining the same cost of a 1660 standard.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $36.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $233.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply BitFenix Whisper M 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $79.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $98.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $893.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-06 13:08 EST-0500

All-in-all, with a faster Ryzen 3600 CPU + faster 1660 SUPER GPU, you can expect around 20-25% improved gaming performance (FPS) and a build which sits taller and wider for future-proofing.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Please"

  • 16 days ago
  • 2 points

Pre-builts is a tricky business. Retailers are more inclined to using just above average parts to achieve the performance required. Essentially, quality components/parts are the least of their concerns which strengthens their primary objective: PROFIT!

For a similar cost, or cheaper, the DIY solution eliminates the forced-fed undesired value of parts in exchange for more robust, better performing and more versatile alternative. Plus, the elimination of labour/service charges where the savings can be put towards more lucrative investments.

Should I buy the pre built or is there something wrong with what's listed as a combo or individual? https://pcpartpicker.com/list/RtXL27

This list is not all that bad for a pre-built. Although:

  • A400 SSD is an entry level unit and for just $5 more you can secure a super fast NVME SSD.

  • The X570 mobo is unnecessary for a gaming build. A Ryzen 3000 compatible B450 MAX for around $100-$115 does the job just as adequately.

  • The AIO cooler is unnecessary. A more affordable $45 air cooler delivers parallel performance and runs quieter. If the RGB element is a must from an aesthetics point of view - I guess it's workable. I'd be more inclined to securing performance at the highest level first before adding eye-candy. Alternatively, the 3700X comes with a pretty decent stock cooler. Not the quietest but for a bundled HSF, it's magnificent :)

  • Personally I would avoid these louder blower type graphics cards for a partner open card with beefier cooling mechanisms. Less noise, improved thermals + a little OC'd performance!

  • A better quality PSU would be in order!


Before recommending a DIY solution...

  1. Is $1200 the absolute max or is there some wiggle room?

  2. Is this for gaming only or are you planning on streaming/rendering/editing/etc?

  3. Are you targeting a standard 1080p higher refresh rate panel or looking to grab a higher resolution display (1440p/4k)? If going high-res, i'd aim higher at the GPU level.

  4. Is RGB an absolute requirement? If yes, it's perfectly fine ..... we're all victims here (well i am) :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build: Advice Wanted"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Ignore the PCPP 'error' which is an error in itself.

These "MAX" boards are revised variants of the traditional B450s and the revision in question is purely for Ryzen 3000-series compatibility. In other words, no update required and fully compatible!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build: Advice Wanted"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point
  • Faster RAM

  • Better performing CPU cooler

  • Faster NVME SSD (storage)

  • A GTX 1660 SUPER (only 1-2% inferior performance to the TI variant for $40 less)

  • A more airflow friendly case to keep things running cooler and quieter

  • A decent mechanical keyboard (if that's of interest).

All the above for only $25 more:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $36.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Best Buy
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $233.98 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $67.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $98.99 @ Amazon
Monitor *AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon K552 Wired Gaming Keyboard $32.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1129.87
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-05 19:44 EST-0500

I'm glad you stuck with a 144hz display (144fps max). For me 240hz panels are over-rated. Personally I can't tell the difference nor does it aid and assist in better K/D ratios (for me). Granted, some users suggest otherwise - I guess i'm not as reflex-savvy. What 144fps does do is deliver exceptional performance and super smooth visuals which is already what I would call "overly saturated performance". Anything above that is just enthusiasm gone nuts or esports highly competitive specialists putting their superman reflexes to use.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build: Advice Wanted"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Yes, but with something like a RTX 2060 SUPER/RX 5700 XT gaming card.

Also achievable with a GTX 1660 SUPER via a mix of low/med/high settings.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Final Tweaks before I begin building this. Opinion?"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

The list is locked. Uncheck "private"

For a more constructive parts list opinion, the build purpose of use would help too (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build, would like some help. Thanks"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Dont think i will need 64GB of RAM, based on what you say i think i would like 32GB. What is best 2x16 or is 4x8 better?

Both combinations work well. The preference being 2x16GB on a consumer 4-dimm slot motherboard. More efficient + keeps 2 slots vacant for prospective upgrades.

For gaming, oddly enough, the 2x16GB solution in a handful of games delivers a nice push of 5-8% FPS and in a quad arrangement other handful of titles see 3-6% better performance. Most games see very little difference between the 2 options hence it doesn't really matter either way.

I will go for the Ryzen 7 3700x. Is the stock cooler good enough?

Definitely good enough! User preference may be more inclined to something that runs quieter at full load and may eventually opt for a beefier unit. Stick with the stock cooler and give it a shot! Upgrading later (if desired) is super easy and doesn't require build disassembly. As an added bonus, if you like RGB, the stock Wraith Prism delivers that too (if interested - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBQ1RUeV_oo)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Son's first build, suggestions please"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

we’re going with 1080p at 144hz. 1660ti should handle that fine correct?

Both the 1660 Super and 1660 TI will easily handle modern demanding games on top settings. The TI variant only holds a 2% performance lead over the newer 1660 Super and being the Super is $30-$40 cheaper it does make the better value card (with very little to zero noticeable performance discrepancy).

Considering the PSU, CASE and your 3600 CPU offering is already secured, which saves you plenty of dosh - there are possibilities here to secure a faster rendering GPU with the likes of a RTX 2060 SUPER / RX 5700. Not necessary but does offer around 25% higher FPS count.

EG.

Ryzen 3600 + 1660 super = 85-100fps (depending on game type)

Ryzen 3600 + RTX 2060 SUPER = 100-120fps (depending on game type)

Either way - both options are simply fantastic for 1080p gaming. Pushing up on a higher FPS model is more of a preference or a better arrangement for future proofing.

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