add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3900x or 3950x for a high end streaming machine?"

  • 4 hours ago
  • 2 points

Unlike rendering/compiling/simulation workloads, etc. unfortunately video encoding/decoding/transcoding or other compression-based workloads do not see the same brisk performance consistency with a 32-thread 3950X. Beyond the encoding spectrum, other finely scalable multi-threaded workloads can achieve performance gains of 15-25% - the higher percentage being more reflective of unique modular workloads/synthetic benchmark tests. The more common median being 15-20% (real-world actualised performance is not guaranteed). For streaming (encoding), this mark-up doesn't apply, especially in some of the test suite results i've come across. I've seen variables where the 3950X achieves only 3%-8% faster runs (over the 3900X) and some random compilations suggesting a 10%+ multi-threaded uplift. This wider margin is unclear - whether conducted in real-time workloads, better scalable artificial encoding tests or promising results from earlier affiliate higher binned samples.

There's a number of possible reasons why the 3950X, a 32-thread mammoth chip, doesn't deliver the desired performance across the board:

  • Poorer compression based client optimisations

  • Evidently discerning Windows OS scheduler drawbacks

  • Unified Memory (UMC) queued limitations/latency

  • Poorly optimised collaborative power performance controls (although recent updates may suggest otherwise)

  • etc (or a combination of the above)

Also, I wouldn't buy into some of the earlier benchmarks as these reviewers had most likely received premium silicon samples (higher binned) which unfortunately does not resonate across the board. Likewise, most of these encoding benchmarks don't account for simultaneous workloads either whereby gaming detracts some of that sought advantage.

Going 3950X - does procure favourable returns in heavy-lift multi-threaded processes but whether it's worth $250 is down to user preference/budget. I guess forthcoming optimisations (BIOS/OS/encode client updates/etc) and manual overclocking is another perf swelling possibility but with current power draw constraints, i can't see anything too promising.

Personally, i'd grab the 3900X and call it a day (actually i'd opt for a 2-build solution - more on that towards the end). For hi-res streaming and gaming, the 3900X should be more than sufficient. With $250 thrown into the upgrade-piggy-saver, it would be interesting to see how Ryzen 4000 series plays out (expected sometime in 2020). We have to remember AMD's consumer platform voyage to multiple CCX 12 core+ designs and the inaugurated dense 7nm process build sits in it's early developed phase and was hardly expected to be perfect across the board. With plenty of time and effort on AMD's part, 4000-series should see a more maturely efficient revision both with the base-architecture and the inevitable loftier IPC uplift - hopefully significantly greater performance returns. I wouldn't expect enterprise-grade possibilities with full-thread load distribution/execution but in the least a performance-savvy worthy upgrade for the asking price. In other words, saving $250 today and selling the 3900X tomorrow (good re-sale value) may open up better and more succinct opportunities down the road. Saying that, with the 3900X in the bag, your multiple core/thread propelled workloads would have to be ridiculously demanding to necessitate an upgrade in the first place - basically, it's far from a gamble.

.....(actually i'd opt for a 2-build solution - more on that towards the end).....

In terms of raw performance, nothing beats a 2-build gaming and streaming solution. Essentially, a second machine for dedicated streaming + a premium capture card with higher quality in-built encoder passthrough. On a single platform, regardless of which higher core count CPU you end up going with, there is one drawback which is unavoidable - "significant performance hits on the gaming side". We're essentially looking at 15-25% drop in fps performance @ 1080p. Marginally lesser with 1440p! That's not to say you can't achieve excellent game performance whilst maintaining top visual quality but if you're looking to achieve max performance on both ends (without game performance compromise) the 2-build solution is the way the go!

I don't usually recommend dedicated builds for gaming and streaming but for someone considering a $750 CPU (assuming the budget is plenty) I believe it's a possibility worthy of consideration. Some of the negatives being, it's not the most power efficient solution, takes up more desk/room space and costs more money but money well-spent if it achieves the set performance targets. The benefits are equally numerous - lesser system latency (CPU/memory/storage/etc), more versatile upgrade opportunities as you're least likely to upgrade the streaming spec, more actively engaged multi-tasking opportunities, etc etc.

I won't add more.... let us know your thoughts and which direction suits you best (3900X? 3950X? or a 2-build behemoth?) Also are you building from scratch? Budget? Have a parts list put together?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I just need some advice"

  • 1 day ago
  • 2 points

Also can someone explain what it means by the Motherboard may need a bios update for the cpu prior to using it and how may I do it?

3rd Gen Ryzen (3000-series) CPUs will only work on most of these previously released B450's if BIOS is updated. You will either need a 1st/2nd GEN CPU in place to run the update or grab a motherboard with a FLASH button update feature which doesn't require a CPU.

Alternatively, you can pick up a B450 "MAX" variant. These are revised motherboards from MSI which run 3000-series out of the box (no update required).

...Otherwise is it okay and what do you recommend...

A few changes:

  • The stock cooler which comes with the 3600 is crap and will limit boost performance. If you're noise-sensitive, that's another reason to opt for an aftermarket cooling solution.

  • Ryzen CPUs and faster Memory frequencies/bandwidth allows the 3600 to push on it's rated boost clock.

  • You could ditch 2-drive storage solution and grab a single 1TB fast NVME SSD. I'm assuming this is a gaming build - games benefit with faster load times / in-game asset management. Won't help with performance though. If you need more than 1TB storage (with immediate effect) revert back to the 480GB/1TB SSD/HD combo. Otherwise, you can always upgrade to additional storage later.

  • The newer GTX 1660 SUPER trails the 1660 TI by 2% with a £45 saving in hand. The super card can easily make up 1/2% gains via overclocking - hence pretty much at par with the TI.

  • A better quality PSU would be nice. For this sort of spec, 450W's is plenty!

  • Case already supports one preinstalled fan. A second fan added for air intake ~better airflow.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £147.98 @ Aria PC
CPU Cooler CRYORIG M9a 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler £19.99 @ Currys PC World
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £63.44 @ CCL Computers
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory £82.99 @ Amazon UK
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £94.49 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB OC Video Card £204.99 @ Amazon UK
Case Thermaltake Versa H17 MicroATX Mini Tower Case £34.05 @ Ebuyer
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply £45.98 @ Currys PC World Business
Case Fan ARCTIC ACFAN00119A 56.3 CFM 120 mm Fan £4.99 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £698.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-27 22:36 GMT+0000

If you can push the budget a little further, preferably (OPTIONAL):

  • This board: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/h7WBD3/msi-b450m-mortar-max-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-mortar-max

  • Subtract the above case + fan which amounts to £40. Add £15 and you've got this monster airflow smart RGB case for £55: https://www.morecomputers.com/a?pid=GMXKAMIKAZEPRO-XPX%3E%3EGame%20Max&referer=PCPart I've had a crack at this case with my nephews fortnite/pubg upgrade and it pretty much blew me away with the features/tempered glass/x4 addressable RGB fans/fan controller/front mesh/and a bunch of other modern-day perks. The funny part of it all, when purchasing I assumed acrylic glass hence the dropped surprise was music to me eyes. I purchased a second one after the first build and left it in storage... (I didn't want a similarly aged second nephew feeling left out... just waiting for his old man to put together a couple of quid for a complete set up). If you rather give RGB/side glass a miss - totally understandable!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "It says I may need an older cpu to upgrade bios?"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

I had to indulge myself:

  • B450 MAX motherboards are Ryzen-3000 ready out of the box.

  • Faster RAM (or higher bandwidth) would be more appealing for Ryzen CPUs (hitting higher with CPU boost clocks)

  • This ones optional. Preferably a 1TB NVME SSD? If you need more storage, add hard drive

  • Don't bother with RTX 2080 cards. Later RTX 2070 revisions landed with the RTX 2070 SUPER cards - which gain around 10-15% performance in games. Only a couple/few % trailing the 2080 - a tiny excusable performance sum in gain of $124 saved!

  • Newer Phankteks AMP PSU (powered by Seasonic).

  • VA panel display (1ms). Better colour reproduction and viewing angles.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $39.17 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.89 @ B&H
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $84.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Phanteks AMP 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1343.98
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-26 21:32 EST-0500

Around $150 saved.... if you fancy splashing out:

  • Maybe a 8-core Ryzen 3700X?

  • More storage?

  • a pricer black/white X570 mobo (not worth it unless the colour coordinated aesthetic is an absolute must). You also have other options: white memory or black/white cooler (The Cryorig H7 comes to mind)

  • etc

Comment reply on Forum Topic "HELP ME, PLS !!: First Build and i need help for correct MoBo and GPU"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

What is the build for? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

OC is not a priority.

Have you considered going the Ryzen 3700X route? Although marginally trailing the 9700K in single threaded performance, the 3700X adds a punch in multi-threaded excursions. IMO, the only reason you might want to consider the 9700K is if overclocking does serve 'priority' for a more meaningful performance boost.

For the GPU i choose a 2070 Super, but i dont know which one, for lenght and performance. Lenght because the idea is to put in front or top the radiator of NZXT Kraken, this is another question, which position for the radiator is the best ?

which position for the radiator is the best ?

Performance-wise there's not much difference in thermals whether you mount the AIO on top or front. If mounted on the top, you'll be exhausting air out. If mounted on the front, you'll be pulling cooler air in and through the rad (intake). In some tests, the front intake orientation sees tiny improvements in thermals. In my personal tests using the same case - a benefit of 1/2c (don't let that concern you as these tests were conducted in artificial extreme conditions with overclocking in full flight).

With the AIO mounted on top, this opens up plenty of clearance for the GPU hence you can opt for any graphics card, as long as length does not exceed 315mm.

With the AIO mounted on the front you'll need to deduct 30mm which is the radiator depth and that leaves you 285mm for GPU clearance. All the following cards are filtered with a max length of 285mm, hence compatible: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#xcx=0&c=447&L=69000000,285000000&sort=price&page=1 My personal choice would be the EVGA XC ULTRA for it's 3-pcie slot bearing chunky heatsink with thermal performance at par with some of the lengthier 3-fan GPUs. This one: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/kHxbt6/evga-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-xc-ultra-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3173-kr

NZXT Kraken X52

For the same price you can grab a larger 280mm (with x2 140mm fans) and newer revised X63 model. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/JfVG3C/nzxt-kraken-x63-9817-cfm-liquid-cpu-cooler-rl-krx63-01

Or if you prefer sticking with 240mm, there's also the revised X53 for $20 less https://pcpartpicker.com/product/PVfFf7/nzxt-kraken-x53-7311-cfm-liquid-cpu-cooler-rl-krx53-01

I haven't looked into specs/thermals/features in comparing previous and newer revised models... hence something worth looking into.

Comment reply on Yolenzo's Completed Build: Windlass 3950X + 128 RAM from Russia

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

cable management :O

Puts me to shame lol

Love the build and overall theme tie-up.

Im just curious - are you seeing any GPU thermal improvements with the 3 extended/raised case fans?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3900x Temps"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

I would still suggest running a monitoring application alongside gaming. Keep a track on core load distribution, clock frequencies + thermals.

Or, try both the OC configuration + default auto boost whilst playing games. Keep an eye on the FPS counter or run a game benchmark by keeping the rendered environment the same for a more accurate comparison. Which ever configuration does better in these benchmarks (higher FPS), stick with it. You can try this routine in a couple of different games to get a better over-all performance bearing before settling with either configuration. Make sure the temps are well-behaved and should you opt to stick with the OC option, make sure to run a stress test as other factors may be compromised and destined to crash. The default configurations take into account a number of other factors for a more stabilised environment and if surpassed via OC, you want to make sure the system is in it's optimal condition via stress tests.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need opinion on pc build a guy did!!!"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

Re read it that was just the first part I didn’t mean to copy from his specs list jeez

ah, that makes sense.

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/203783310738121/

For a brand spanking new build (with part receipts/warranties intact) $600 seems reasonable considering:

  • It's a pre-built ($50 labour charges/incentive applies. That's a cheap rate!!)

  • Incl. Windows 10 OS ($100 MSRP, although I wouldn't be surprised if it's an OEM license on the cheapie)

  • Incl. a wraith prism RGB cooler (worth $30-$35, although probably retailing for a little more)

  • Total: $185. subtract from $600 = $415 for the parts (yep, good deal)


What if's:

  • If you have a Windows license already (an optimist speculation)

  • If you're willing to go the DIY route (assembling the build yourself)

  • If you're willing to stick with a half-decent stock cooler for the time being

With the above 3 in the affirmative and possibly a little more over $600 of spending cash, you could grab a 15% faster 2nd Gen Ryzen 2600X + a 20% faster and more efficient GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card + a B450 more current chipset + faster NVME SSD + faster RAM.

But then again, it's a lot of "if's" and a Ryzen 1600 + RX 570 with the added perks makes for a pretty decent deal @ $600.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need opinion on pc build a guy did!!!"

  • 3 days ago
  • 2 points

How did:

Need opinion on pc build a guy did!!!

turn to:

Feel free to Message me if you have any questions. You can come check it out and test if you’d like. Cash or Facebook pay preferred. I will consider trades. Accepting offers.

whilst misrepresenting the forum category!

don't answer - just delete the post and redirect to the correct forum/s

Comment reply on Forum Topic "kraken??"

  • 3 days ago
  • 2 points

VENTING TIME (grab a cup of tea)

CAM is a nice piece of software when it works and the most friendliest and modern user interface i've come across. Then again, looks can be deceiving!!

My previous experience with CAM (2017-2018) was awful to say the least with one problem after the other. Where fixes were applied with update patches, additional problems emerged. In the course of almost 2 years, twice i've ended up running a clean install of Windows to resolve the issues - the 2nd being towards the end of 2018. What ever updated version was out back then did the job and since then much of the earlier concerns were resolved. My only remaining concern is the 4-fan rad push/pull configuration capable of running @ 2000rpm failing to post beyond 1150rpm. A minor discrepancy as I intended to run these at lower RPMs anyway (keeping noise levels in the comfy zone). Other than that for the better part of 2019 and beyond, everything else is working flawlessly.

Some of the other problems encountered previously 1) driver conflicts with other applications 2) CAM failing to start (although the AIO was fully operational - phew!) 3) Incorrect performance/sensory reports with CPU stats 4) Weird occasional stalls/crashes when either left on idle/returning from system sleep 5) failing to update to newer released patches 6) saved RGB profiles deleted 7) probably a couple of other minor issues (oh, and game overlay FAIL).

I haven't had any problem with any of the above of late (2019 onwards). I guess these problems have been resolved but current user feedback may suggest otherwise. Overall - the cooler functionality is independent from CAM which always seemed functional at all times regardless of software/driver inconsistencies. Although i've read complaints from a handful of other more current buyers (amazon, etc) suggesting the automated fan curve/alternating pump adjustments are not kicking in with real-time corresponding workloads. I haven't experienced the same with my Kraken X62.

Bottom line: I don't know what to make of it! With my personal experience in the last 12 months, i'm happy with the Krakens functionality (and CAM) and would recommend the aesthetic appeal which was the primary reason for purchasing this unit (x62). Performance wise, even with the fans maxing out @ 1150rpm, it does the job very nicely. Where i'm a little hesitant in giving CAM a thumbs up is current buyer feedback reviews. But then again, the same applied when I was purchasing the X62 and finally bit the bullet and went for it. It worked like a charm to begin with but a couple of odd crashes here and there. Then it started going belly-up with my first update patch (a few weeks in) - and then a long time later a happy ending :) I have to admit, i still crap my pants each time NZXT releases a new update!

Anything good about them?

z63/z77

Haven't tried either of these models. The cost alone for me is a no-go zone. But I can see the aesthetic appeal + LCD function - something buyers wouldn't mind splashing out on.

I guess I mostly like the design, is it any better than the h100i or Deepcool GAMERSTORM CAPTAIN 240PRO V2 69.34 CFM.

You said it yourself "mostly like the design" .... that's what really sets it apart

Keep in mind, the H100i and deepcool unit are 240mm rads. The Z63 from NZXT is a 280mm RAD, which is likely to come out ahead by a small performance margin. Deepcool and corsair offer 280mm options too. Same size radiators + x2 140mm fans will compete negligibly hence performance-wise either of these options will simply get the job done. The one thing Corsair does a little better with some variants is premium pre-installed fans which run at a lower RPM to eliminate half the noise level at max loads. The compromise being, running a couple/few degrees warmer. Not a huge biggie, as you can change the fans to more premium alternatives (eg. noctua/etc) with either of these units.

Getting one for a an AMD CPU.

If you want to save money, a $50+ traditional cooler will deliver similar performance (although trailing marginally) or a $80-$100 alternative gets you pretty much on par performance (1-3c difference -/+)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Throw a 1660 Super in this system - 1440p gaming?"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm glad you brought this up because I have a question on the subject of upgrading. If I were to bite the bullet and go for a full PC upgrade (basically a whole new build barring case and psu), would you recommend waiting for the new Ryzen/Intel chips and new GPU's that are due to come out this year? If I am going to go for a new build I am quite keen to get the most up to date hardware.

My personal take: if you're happy with your current hardware (incl. the newer GTX upgrade) and anticipated game performance, stick with what you have for as long as possible. If that means having to dodge 2020 all-together for forthcoming generational architectures, so be it! Year-in-year-out there's always something bigger/better around the corner hence there's no perfect opportunity to schedule an upgrade. On the most part, if your current rig finally starts to whimper or it's not up-to-scratch with more demanding tasks / games, this would be a pretty good indicator for mission upgrade-affirmative.

In your case, the i5-6500 is drivable in lesser CPU resource dense games. If you're looking to expand to more demanding titles or newer cutting-edge games in the long run, the 6500 is likely to struggle hence a 2020/or so upgrade makes sense. If you're sticking with your 2 currently played titles until the year 2099 (lol) with current performance targets remaining the same, your next upgrade should be in 2099 (unless Windows/game devs force wonky update patches which suggest otherwise). I hope it makes sense :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "~2500€ Austria | Didnt build in a long time, need some help"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

sounds likes a plan :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3900x Temps"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

Yes this is possible on lower-thread exploited workloads but whether it's sustained or 12-thread stomached performance is another story. Most likely you're seeing 1/2 core short-lived performance spikes in the plus 4400 territory. You might want to run something like HWINFO alongside the game and see how each of the threads are measuring up in real-time. If you're continuously hitting 4400-4450Mhz (variably) on all 12 runners, you've got a mighty multiple silicon lotto on your hand.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "~2500€ Austria | Didnt build in a long time, need some help"

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

That's perfectly compatible.

Note: 'GPU clearance' with the Meshify C case:

If positioning the AIO using the case top mount, you have no concerns with GPU clearance. The Meshify C maintains 315mm of GPU clearance with the front case fans accounted for.

If mounting the AIO at the front: the selected AIO radiator carries a depth of 27mm which leaves you around 287mm for GPU clearance. For the GTX 1660 SUPER the clearance provided is plenty. For the vast majority of 2-fan higher-end current graphics cards you shouldn't have any problems as these are usually under 280mm in length. Likewise, with higher end 2-fan newer GEN cards (expected) you should be fine, assuming Nvidia/partner cards will maintain the form factor. If your personal preference is to opt for a lengthier graphics card (upgrade) with 3 fans, which are usually in excess of 300mm, this is where you will to run into problems. Mounting the AIO on top solves the concern - otherwise depending on your preference, you might fancy a different case option.

If you want to view how other users have mounted their AIOs in respect to the above and how the overall build appears (aesthetically), the following link are completed builds - all using the same case with 240mm AIO radiators: https://de.pcpartpicker.com/builds/by_part/nL7v6h#h=690,621,606,659,676,699,423,696,585,490,685,721,594,503,573,622

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3900x Temps"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

60c with gaming is heavenly!!

BTW- you might want to leave everything set on default. At default (stock), the pre-engineered boost configurations are seen to deliver best single-threaded performance. This is where you'll achieve better performance in games with higher clock frequencies.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "~2500€ Austria | Didnt build in a long time, need some help"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

I would honestly wait for the next gen, but my current PC is having bigger and bigger problems with bluescreens atm. I will look into that

Just curious... have you got a spec at hand to share for the current machine? if not, what are you running (CPU/GPU)?

BSODs are also largely driver conflicts/window kernel misadventures. Updating software or removing bad omens may resolve the issue. As a last resort, a clean installation of Windows usually resolves a vast number of unidentified issues. Before attempting the "last resort", if it's GPU related, you might fancy a clean uninstallation of the GPU driver (using DDU) and then re-installing the driver from the card manufacturers support page. Again, i'm curious what you're currently running... esp GPU!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "~2500€ Austria | Didnt build in a long time, need some help"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Well-within budget but consider this a placeholder. Also the sellers used are German-based which I'm assuming is similar to your local (euro) cost. Unfortunately, PCPP doesn't provide the option to select parts which correspond with your local region/sellers.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor €482.89 @ Mindfactory
CPU Cooler be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler €73.89 @ Aquatuning
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard €227.90 @ Alternate
Memory Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory €166.25 @ Amazon Deutschland
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive €139.94 @ Amazon Deutschland
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive €62.26 @ Amazon Deutschland
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB BLACK GAMING Video Card €745.99 @ Alternate
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case €96.89 @ Alternate
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply €113.99 @ Amazon Deutschland
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €2110.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-24 21:43 CET+0100

NOTES:

  • CPU: You also have the option of grabbing a 16 physical core 3950X. Both the 3900X/3950X are aimed at multi-threaded workloads. For gaming alone, a 6-core 3600X / 8-core 3700X is more than sufficient. Alternatively, if you fancy manual overclocking, the 8-core Intel i9-9900K/KF/KS would be the more appealing option.

  • CPU cooler: You mentioned RGB. You might prefer going the AIO route (240/280mm rad). Doesn't do much better in terms of performance over a beefier air cooler but does serve up the eye-candy with several RGB AIO options to choose from. Also, if sticking with RGB RAM, these larger air coolers end up hanging over the dimm slots which sucks. To remedy, either 1) go AIO, 2) grab a moderately sized/performing air cooler with an RGB fan.

  • RAM: There are marginally faster modules available, rated at 3600Mhz for a little more cash on top.

  • Mobo: There's a bunch of X570s to choose from. You might want to check the options here: https://de.pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#c=138&sort=price&page=1

  • Storage: This is one is down to user requirement. Feel free to adjust the capacities/re-arrange. 1TB of fast NVME storage is sufficient for the operating system, applications, active project files as well as a few weighty demanding games.

  • GPU: This is tough one. For your 1440p 144hz display, the "pricey" RTX 2080 SUPER makes for an excellent fit. The problem being, we're expecting next gen Nvidia GPUs sometime in the next few months which are rumoured to pack a punch with wider performance gains. It's not the best of times to purchase an expensive graphics card. Either opt for the 2080 SUPER or lower the performance goals and grab something more affordable now and upgrade later. Personally, i'd grab something like a GTX 1660 SUPER with a lower performance target of 60fps @ 1440p which is possible in demanding games on high/ultra settings. As soon as NEXT GEN cards become available, sell it and grab yourself the new and mightier. Or if you have a gaming card at hand already which adequately manages 1440p, stick with it. If you can't be bothered to wait, no problem, your budget is plenty to secure a 2080 Super.

  • CASE: This ones down to user preference. There's a whole bunch of equally fantastic mid/full tower case options available (https://de.pcpartpicker.com/products/case/#t=4,3&B=3&X=6635,132600&sort=price&page=1). With your desire to accommodate RGB, you might fancy something with pre-installed fan hubs, RGB fans + front case mesh/tempered glass. If you're uncertain, go through a bunch of these cases and select 3 which are most appealing and report back here to get some feedback.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Throw a 1660 Super in this system - 1440p gaming?"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

and surprisingly my r9 380 seems to handle 1440p very well at medium settings (I only play DayZ and AOE2 DE, so nothing too demanding).

If you're managing 60fps (or more) on medium settings in these lesser demanding titles, the GTX 1660 Super should easily manage higher/ultra quality settings.

Generally for 1440p a higher ranking card is usually recommended, especially for more graphically intense gaming titles. But for your selected games and being your content with current performance, the GTX 1660 SUPER makes for a pretty solid upgrade.

I don't believe my i5-6500 will be too much of a botteleneck because at 1440p games are mostly GPU bound.

Possibly! If you are planning on branching out on more demanding titles, the the i5-6500 might not cut it. Otherwise you're in good hands. A marginal bottleneck is perfectly fine. If you end up seeing more wider punishing penalties, that shouldn't be a problem either as you can always upgrade the platform later on for something better - preferably when Ryzen 4000 series hits the shelves (or intel newcomers - if the perf/price is attractive).

"1440p games are mostly GPU bound" - correct! which eases the burden-of-concern assuming both games are already running smoothly.

Also I wouldn't recommend purchasing higher end cards at the mo (above the 1660 super) as Nvidia is set to launch next GEN Ampere GPUs which are boastfully rumoured with excessive performance gains. A 200 quid 1660 super feels like a safer bet!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU cooler do you suggest?"

  • 5 days ago
  • 2 points

with a 240 or 280 rad, would I stick that on the front?

Yes, the front supports both 240+280 radiators. Assumning you are planning on keeping the two pre-installed 140mm AER RGB fans, you'll want to grab a 280mm radiator (AIO).

The Elite case only has singular top and back vents for fan mounting and as I'm said, airflow is a concern and rad on front wouldn't exactly bring cool air into the case right?

The front air intake is achieved from the side vent, which surprisingly works well (adequately @ stock conditions). The front fans will pull "cooler" air (from the outside) through the vent and pass through the radiator which in some tests dictates better performance. Anyway this comparison doesn't matter - since the H510 elite doesnt support 280mm rads on the rear/top and a 280mm rad is always going to outperform a 120/140mm option (by a clear mile).

Do I do a single 140mm AIO cpu cooler and mount rad to top vent and keep two front fans and one rear fan airflow direction?

The H500 elite only supports a 120mm rad on the rear (not 140mm). The top mount is fan-only (unless there is a workaround with a super thin closed loop rad, which I'm not aware of).

I've read single liquid aio is a waste of money because at that point air cooling is just as effective. I'm torn and a rookie lol. SOS plox <333

Actually $50-$90 higher tier beefier air coolers (which are also liquid based) perform as good as a 280mm AIOs. Likewise mid-ranged $35-$40 air coolers perform as good as 120/140mm AIOs. Going AIO is a user preference based on the aesthetic appeal or just fancying something lesser of a stuffer opposed to those chunky and RGB RAM over-shadowing heatsinks.

To get a better feel with weighed in options: view user completed builds which use the same case: https://pcpartpicker.com/builds/by_part/kpx2FT You can also filter down the search results (from the left pane) with your/user selected cooling options (120mm/280mm/beefier air coolers/moderate ones/etc). I always tend to view completed builds to get a better idea as to which parts will represent my personal aesthetic leanings and what is compatible without having to refer to documentation/specs/etc (although it's always a good idea to double check).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3900x Temps"

  • 6 days ago
  • 2 points

33c idle: NICE

60c game: NICE

82c in strenuously heavy-lift multi-threaded workloads with a 12 core 24 thread chip sounds pretty reasonable to me. You have to remember these chips can consume above 200W's of power and being these are fragmented/clustered core arrangements which are not central to the IHS (where energy/heat dissipation is best mined), higher temps are expected. The greater concern is dwindling performance (CPU throttling) - if you're getting decent returns (all core/thread around 4.18-4.22Ghz feasible bench) in these types of workloads, i wouldn't worry.

More importantly, how are you fairing in your actual multi-threaded workflows? Cinebench heavy lifting is not representative of most real-world multi-threaded workloads hence you are likely to see better results in your actively engaged projects/rendering/streaming/etc.

If this is a game-only rig - ignore cinebench all-together (unless you're bench-pressing single-threaded performance only)!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help in deciding the right CPU for gaming (AMD vs INTEL)"

  • 6 days ago
  • 5 points

The 3700X is simply the better buy for the following reasons:

  • $60 dollars less

  • marginally trailing the 9700k in single threaded performance. We're literally talking about 4-5fps avg difference @ 1080p (top quality configs in demanding games). IMO, not enough to warrant a $60 premium above the 3700X.

  • The multi-threaded 3700X is a 16-thread CPU and the 9700K is a 8-thread single-threaded CPU. 8 additional threads on the 3700X delivers a whopping 30% increase in "multi-threaded workloads", which resembles a 10 logical core compute vehicle. With newer windows optimisations/DX 12 and game developers equally appreciating greater compute resources, the future is looking brighter with multi-threaded performance. Multi-threaded support on the 3700X is a no-nonsense bonus and the endearing price tag makes this CPU an absolute treat.

  • Current AM4 sockets are likely to support next gen 4000 series CPUs. A nice perk should 4000-series CPUs deliver a wider performance gap compared to previous gens.

  • The value proposition is further advanced with the inclusion of a pretty effective heatpiped (vapor chamber) stock cooler which runs great and manages a decent uplift in boost clock frequencies. There's always room for improvement but for most its an equitable unit.

Arguments in favour of 9700K:

  • Manual overclocking! If this is something which is part-n-parcel with the build requirement, intel continues to support a manually contrived performance uplift which sees greater a gap in overall performance in gaming. Although, it does get a little pricey as you'll be looking at a $50+ cooler (or $80+ for best results) + a pricier Z390 modifier motherboard ($150+).

  • If you're looking to grab a 240hz gaming panel and fancy hitting a 200fps+ target, the 9700K makes sense - esp. including overclocking potential. In lesser demanding games and lower graphics quality configurations, a marginally faster single threaded processor sees significantly better FPS returns - which makes the 240fps target more promising.

So it's down to user preference / performance targets.

Comment reply on B-Design's Completed Build: The Corsair Ninja 650X F9

  • 6 days ago
  • 2 points

Amazing looking dark knight rider!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Advice"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

I agree. My personal preference (if going white + RGB) would also favour the icue 220t for both the design aesthetic + $50 saving :)

Tons of features:

  • tempered glass
  • front air intake cut-outs
  • x3 RGB fans included
  • Fan hub included (supports 6 RGB fans)
  • fully dust filtered
  • PSU shroud
  • depth-small compact design
  • nice colour scheme
  • etc

For $109 thats a value-steal!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Advice"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

Yes - plug and play. The drivers should be pre-installed or automatically downloaded through windows update. Or, you can download the driver from the manufacturers product support page.

If you have easy and convenient access to ethernet, don't bother with WIFI.... ethernet is always the best solution!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Advice"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

This looks great!!

Keep in mind, if you need WIFI, you will need a WIFI card/USB adapter.

The only thing I would look to change is the PSU. It's a great unit, but for $104 you can do better for the same cost - something like: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4xGnTW/phanteks-amp-650-w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-ph-p650g_us01

It's a newly launched unit from Phanteks (using one of the best manufacturers in town: Seasonic) + fully modular!

If user feedback is crucial by a significant sum, for $5 more this ones an equally fantastic unit (again fully modular too): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/2HbwrH/corsair-rmx-2018-650w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020178-na

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Advice"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

I’m a little confused on your reason for changing the motherboard, do you mind dumbing that down for me

no problem.

"B450" motherboards require a BIOS update in order to support Ryzen 3000 series CPUs (Ryzen 3600/3600x/3700x/etc). This cannot be achieved with a newly purchased 3000 series CPU. You will either have to use an older compatible CPU or use the Flash Bios button feature to first update the board and then you can use the new Ryzen 3600 CPU.

"B450 MAX" eliminates the above hassle. Motherboards which are labelled "MAX" are already Ryzen 3000 ready so the update process is no longer required. MAX labelled motherboards also use a large BIOS chip which allows full use of all features pertaining to the chipset/motherboard functions. For gaming I wouldn't worry so much about "full-feature potential" as all primary functions for a gaming and general day-to-day build are already fully accessible.

If you want to stick with the MSI B450 GAMING PRO CARBON AC, it does support the Flash Button Bios update feature so you won't need a previous GEN CPU. This will require downloading a more current BIOS version (from the board manufacturers support page) to a USB stick and then a follow-up on the following instructions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTkXunUAriE

Also, what is your reason for the graphics card change?

EVGA recently launched the KO variants with a marginally lower boost clock but greater OC potential. In other words, you can save a little money and can easily push the card to match the performance of a $330-$350 2060. If you prefer a different card from an aesthetics point of view - go for it... it's only a play of $20 or so bucks.

Alternatively, for $20 more, this higher clocked KO variant which also supports some decent overclocking headroom to push for a little more juice: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/2H7p99/evga-geforce-rtx-2060-6-gb-ko-ultra-gaming-video-card-06g-p4-2068-kr

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Music Production/Gaming Build"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

Ah! I wasn't aware any of the AMD X570s supported TB.

Anyway, back to the drawing board. The good news: your budget is capable of securing both the Designare + multi-threaded i9-9900KF CPU. That's almost a 30%+ push in project completion times and faster rendering in general. The question is, is the RGB case and AIO a compromise you are willing to forfeit. That's purely down to user preference :) I'll understand if it's in the negative... nothing wrong with a little flare with some aesthetic appeal as long as you aware of the alternative performance possibilities :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Advice"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

I got a feeling you're absolutely sold on that case and it's RGB appeal. Without swapping it out:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Deepcool GAMMAXX GTE 56.5 CFM CPU Cooler $29.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.89 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $95.99 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $112.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $303.98 @ Newegg
Case Corsair iCUE 465X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case $143.75 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.18 @ Amazon
Wireless Network Adapter Asus PCE-AC55BT B1 PCIe x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter $31.85 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1077.61
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-21 13:35 EST-0500

Notes:

  • The 3600 chip deserves an aftermarket cooler as the stock addition is going to drive you nuts (if noise-sensitive-affirmative). A beefier cooler is equally useful in raising the bar with the CPU's ranked boost clock capabilities (better performance).

  • Swapped the board for a B450 "MAX" variant. These are newer additions to the B450 line-up, supplemented primarily for "Ryzen 3000 readiness". No BIOS updates required. Likewise, the MAX variants support larger BIOS chips which fully support 3rd GEN amalgamated features and are more prone to lesser compromise with future updates.

  • Assuming you need wifi, i've thrown in a wifi pcie card. If not needed - retract.

  • Faster RAM for a few bucks more.

  • Double the storage. If you intend on installing a bunch of demanding games, 500GB will quickly fill up. You don't want to max out the capacity at it's full length as it will impact performance. 1TB fast NVME storage added. Feel free to retract if the requirement is safe-keeps @ 500GB.

Other possibilities:

  • Possibly a budget case for around $50 and get a faster functioning graphics card. This ones purely down to user preference. For 1080p gaming, the RTX 2060 is phenomenal - does a pretty good job at 1440p too (60fps+). For 12-15% gains in GPU performance the $50 case leverage allows for a 2060 SUPER (purely optional).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Music Production/Gaming Build"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

For a core count sensitive music production rig, assuming you want the absolute best performance possible for the budget.... i'd look to Ryzen's higher core count multi-threaded CPUs. 3rd Gen Ryzen is equally fantastic for game performance. Although, this will come at a cost of eliminating some of the aesthetic flare. Also an indispensable compromise if you're looking to play games @1440p which will demand a better graphics card (assuming you want to maintain higher visual quality functions in demanding games).

Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $469.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler $48.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $182.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $150.98 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $129.94 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $53.98 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $303.98 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $99.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Phanteks AMP 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $105.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1546.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-21 13:05 EST-0500

Essentially:

  • A 12 core 24 thread Ryzen 3900X CPU which aims to rip through complex audio projects at twice the speed.

  • Faster Ryzen process complimentary RAM

  • Faster NVME SSD (x3+ the speed over traditional SATA-SSDs). 1TB is sufficient for the OS, applications and active projects + active asset libraries. Also sufficient for your most played gaming titles. You won't lose any performance saving games on the HD, other than slower but workable game load times.

  • Doubled up on HD capacity @ 2TB - only a few bucks more!!

  • Faster graphics card. If you're serious about 1440p gaming, the RTX 2060 is capable of achieving 60fps+ via higher/ultra demanding game configurations (a select few may push for med/high configs). Works wonders with higher refresh rate panels with lesser demanding games or down-tuned quality configurations. If the budget has wings, you could push up on the 12-15% faster RTX 2060 SUPER card (or go higher...).

  • Better quality PSU

The compromise:

  • AIO cooler

  • Aesthetically pleasing case

The more concerning compromise:

  • Thunderbolt 3. If the build requirement initial selection for the Designare motherboard was to secure TB3, that pretty much changes everything. I'll have to look into whether X570 boards support TB (let me know).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I7 9700k vs I9 9900k"

  • 7 days ago
  • 3 points

But when it comes to gaming what FPS difference would there really be?

IMO, nothing worthy of note. On average a couple of FPS here and there. If overclocking + strictly gaming, grab the 9700K.

If it makes it easier, i'm using a 3 year old '4 core/8 thread' i7-7700K 5.0Ghz (OC) chip which trails the 9700K/9900K by an average of 10fps (lesser at higher resolutions). In a vast number of demanding games, 10 real-world useless and microscopically unperceivable frame gains are worthless IMO, especially considering my system is capable of achieving 100-120fps (at 1440p/1080 ti). Granted, there are a handful of well-optimised games which scale better on 8 logical cores (+HT) but for me personally, the performance gains again are negligible as my performance targets are already well within their respective range. In other words, I certainly won't be upgrading anytime soon, even though i've got the itch to just build/upgrade and my tech-upgrade-savings-gold-pot is currently overflowing.

For a more meaningful upgrade path, keeping the 9700K in play, depending on what you have in the graphics department, you're more likely to benefit with a GPU upgrade (or wait for ampere Nvidia cards which is expected sometime mid-2020). The same applies if you're targeting higher resolution displays. For example, 1440p and over, is more GPU-territory opposed to CPU.

Is I7 my better bet?

Imo, yes! There is the greater thread future proof argument but to-date I haven't seen anything concrete-enough to support this claim. Actually, some/many games have proven to perform better with a 8 core single threaded CPU when accounting for 1% fps lows.

I also hear the I9's can run hot.

Correct. That's expected with an 8 core '16 thread' higher binned CPU. Although for gaming it isn't a huge concern as long as you've got a decent cooler on board. Some of the "too hot" hype flying around is mostly in measure of unrealistic synthetic benchmarks or lesser frequent all-core brutal workloads with 5.0Ghz+ OC.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "[first build][feedback and advice requested]Gaming and editing AMD mATX build"

  • 8 days ago
  • 3 points

Finally, intentions with the storage are as follows:- To have the 2 NVMe SSDs with my poor library of AAA games on. The 2TB SSD will have software and less demanding games on. The 250GB SSD will be partitioned for the OS, and the other part configured as a cache drive for the 5TB HDD which will be used for general storage particularly photos, documents, music, and videos. The idea is this should help a lot with speeding up editing work.

For getting the best out of modern day storage, you want to place your OS, applications and active workloads/projects on the faster NVME SSD. A single 500GB NVME SSD should suffice. If your workload regularly relies on large content libraries/project asset catalogues or makes use of large active/multiple projects, it would be a good idea to grab a larger 1TB NVME SSD. This also eliminates the need for a dedicated cache repository unit.

SSD's don't necessarily help with gaming performance. At best, the benefit is limited to faster load times which is nice. The MX500 is solid for this purpose. For a little more cash you could update to a cable-less M.2 SATA SSD/M.2 BUDGET NVME SSD but it's not necessary.

For everything else, incl older/least accessed games, stick these on the HD. If you need more storage for this purpose, drop 5TB and grab a 6/8TB, or double up on 5TB.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
Storage ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £139.97 @ Box Limited
Storage Crucial MX500 2 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive £187.00 @ Amazon UK
Storage Toshiba X300 5 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £108.69 @ CCL Computers
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £435.66
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-20 21:13 GMT+0000

Feel free to increase the storage capacities or add another M.2 if you like (if needed). Otherwise, use the savings here for a faster 3600Mhz 2x16GB memory, a more robust and better quality PSU + a better quality case to compliment the overall build.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build"

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

With a $1000 gaming budget + some wiggle room, this is where you want to be:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Deepcool GAMMAXX GTE 56.5 CFM CPU Cooler $29.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI B450-A PRO MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $399.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.34 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1034.26
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-20 13:51 EST-0500

The Graphics card entirely depends on your display. If you're targeting 1080p 144hz higher refresh rate or higher resolution gaming, get the best card the budget can afford, alongside a 6 core multi-threaded Ryzen 3600.

If you prefer spending less, grab a RTX 2060 KO card from EVGA for around $300 - also great for 1080p higher refresh rate gaming. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/rTpmP6/evga-geforce-rtx-2060-6-gb-ko-gaming-video-card-06g-p4-2066-kr

If you need more storage (opposed to the 1TB fast NVME stick), like-wise grab the 2060 KO + add 1/2TB HD.

If you're locked on 1080p 60hz panel - take something more affordable with the likes of a 1660 super: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/GzPgXL/evga-geforce-gtx-1660-super-6-gb-sc-ultra-gaming-video-card-06g-p4-1068-kr

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Logging off and on to system crashed Windows 10"

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

kernel 41:

  1. make sure Windows is up-to-date. Check for newer GPU driver updates. The possibility being, something is crashing (software related). Worst case scenario, run DDU for a clean GPU driver install (download from Nvidia's driver support page). If you are running third party software which is active in the background, i'd turn it off. For eg, Teamviewer & Logitech's gaming software was causing me a number of issues whilst gaming in a couple of my favourite titles. Logitech software update resolved the issue. Not sure about teamviewer - I have it turned off whilst gaming and haven't tested later updates since. Other game/system utility plugin/lapped/overlay apps are also likely culprits - turn everything non-native to the OS off when troubleshooting.

  2. Power shortage (hardware related). Check all power connections. Make sure everything is connected properly. Some of these connectors can be a little rigid and may need a little force for a snug snap fit. The usual culprit from my experience is the 24-pin ATX, or 8/4-pin CPU, or in this case possibly the GPU 8x8's.

I looked up the EL display 4101, again possible GPU driver conflict. DDU (run in safe mode) would be a good place to start to iron out this possibility. Remember to download the driver directly from Nvidia. If the problem persists, possibly try a version down as brand spanking newer updates can be conflicting at times.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What should I change with my build?"

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

With the 2080 super, I think I should go with a Red Devil 5700XT for the cost.

Or RTX 2070 SUPER - $200 saved and accounts for 12-15% better performance over the 5700 XT. Other benefits: better driver support as AMD driver conflicts remain (in a handful of game titles - not all). The 2070 SUPER, although a $100 more over the 5700 XT, also makes sense as it avoids having to purchase a dedicated FreeSync panel (as mentioned).

If the GPU can be a delayed a little longer, NVIDIA is set to launch next GEN AMPERE cards - rumoured for launch in the 2nd quarter of 2020. Some rumours suggest a massive shift in performance, as much as 50%+ (others are suggesting greater perf percentages). Being these higher mid-ranged GPUs are expensive, you are more likely to achieve greater performance for the same cost with NEXT GEN offerings.

I guess the above is only valid if you have a 1440p workable decent card already or if you're willing to wait.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My third build."

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

How much do you prefer spending on the build + display?

For a little less @ $1189 (around $60 saving):

  • You can keep the RTX 2060

  • revert back to a 144hz higher refresh rate gaming panel

  • marginally faster RAM sticks

  • and throw in an aftermarket cooler which is essential to get the best out of the 3600 CPU.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Deepcool GAMMAXX GTE 56.5 CFM CPU Cooler $29.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI B450-A PRO MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Blue SN550 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.98 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $303.98 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.34 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.99 @ B&H
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Logitech K120 Wired Standard Keyboard $6.49 @ Target
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1189.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-20 12:17 EST-0500

If you want to trim the cost further, let us know your preferred budget ceiling so we can work accordingly. Further cuts will have some minor compromises but not short of a capable and solid gaming build. For example, a Ryzen 2600X + GTX 1660 SUPER does the job nicely too.

so I hope to save some money by choosing a lower graphics card if it doesn't affect framerates at high-ultra settings.

For this fps@ultra requirement you'll want to stick with the 3600 + RTX 2060 combo and trim the build elsewhere. I would also look to keep the 144hz panel in check. Lesser demanding games and a number of a AAA's will easily shift past 75fps hence a 75hz panel will be limiting.

Also note, I have selected Windows "home" for the operating system. If specific 'pro' features are necessary for your build requirement, let me know.

Comment reply on EPGInformatique's Completed Build: Ultra Gaming NZXT Black

  • 9 days ago
  • 2 points

I never did like these types of dual-layered RGB fans as they stuck out like a sore thumb and left all the the other parts looking a little too ordinary. This build proves otherwise... perfectly corresponding parts and finally RGB melody in good measure!!! Those thicker and curved RGB RAM sticks and GPU sag bracket design was made for these fans lol. Or vice versa (incl. the pump ring).

+1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel and AMD"

  • 9 days ago
  • 3 points

With DX12/Windows optimisations and auxiliary game code developments, we're seeing better and more stable performance with "multi-threaded" 6/8 core CPUs. These optimisations are seeing more favourable all-core load distribution hence anything with greater compute resources will be the sensible way forward. The same applies for non-gaming multi-threaded/simultaneous workloads.

This i5-9400/i5-9600K are single-threaded CPUs hence give it a miss

Like the others, I too would recommend the 8 core/16 thread 2700X approach. The value proposition is fantastic and you get an adequately suited heatpiped (vapor chamber) cooler included (sustained boost loads not far off from the rated boost spec).

The 3600 does edge out a little better for strictly gaming but for your added workloads (Unity) + back-end multiple processes, the more the cores the better.

Comment reply on cosmicdrew's Completed Build: cosmic✧elegy Workstation v1.4

  • 10 days ago
  • 2 points

Incl the GPU... that's 13 fans, enough to fire up the cosmic elegy into space :)

I like the uniform aesthetic appeal and colour tone +1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc To Play World Of Warcraft"

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

"i used to have" = no longer at hand.

Actually, if this build is retrievable, i'd imagine the 970 would be of credible service and with WOW being a more CPU-bound title, a newer platform with a 3600X would make better sense.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc To Play World Of Warcraft"

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

o you think I would need any additional Fans, The case I have already had 1x front, 1x side and 2x top, Just thinking for cooling might be a bit overkill.

If you already have these 4 fans at hand, this is more than sufficient - providing these are compatible with the case.

If not, generally x1 fan for exhaust and x1 for intake is sufficient. Doubling up on this arrangement with a total of 4 fans (2 intake, 2 exhaust) works a little better but it's not necessary. If you rather spend less, stick with 2 and see how you get on. Add additional fans later as you see fit.

I used to have a i5-4590 with a GTX 970 G1 windforce, but the GPU was so big it causes cooling issues.

You've got no worries with a GTX 1650 SUPER - power efficiency at it's best and should hit up around 65c-70c max in game load conditions. With reasonable case airflow, 65c is a benched outcome pulled from 2 reliably independent in-depth reviews. Most likely lesser with lesser GPU resource crunching titles with the likes of WOW.

If you prefer something that's a little better in terms of thermals and noise levels (negligible thermal disparity but a nice return with lower acoustics): https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/9L7p99/msi-geforce-gtx-1650-super-4-gb-gaming-x-video-card-gtx-1650-super-gaming-x

Do you think I should push the GPU up a bit to at 1660?

For a tiny bump in price, the 1660 does perform a little better (+ 6GB VRAM, which will come handy if running up-n-coming newer VRAM hungry games). If you are able to increase the budget by 40 quid, a "GTX 1660 SUPER" sees more meaningful performance gains and it's only 20 quid or so over the 1660 asking price. If you are planning on playing more graphically challenging games, the 1660 SUPER makes for a solid investment.

Alternatively, if strictly WOW or similarly lesser GPU reliant games are targeted, you could use that £40 quid and grab yourself a 3rd Gen Ryzen 3600/3600X CPU instead. The game physics at higher quality presets are more CPU-bound hence a faster single threaded CPU will add favour in drawing better performance. In other words, for strictly WOW: Ryzen 3600/3600X + 1650 Super combo is stellar!

Beyond WOW, if the games library is expected to expand to more GPU-reliant demanding games, the 2600X + 1660 SUPER makes for the better balance (ultra presets whilst maintaining 60fps+). If the budget expanse is more favourable than I had imagined, the 3600/3600X + 1660 SUPER would be the icing on the cake.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc To Play World Of Warcraft"

  • 12 days ago
  • 1 point

The 2700X isn't going to make any/much difference in this type of game.

Grab a 2600X and use the savings to secure:

  • a better board which draws power and dissipates heat more effectively to get the best out of the CPU's auto overclocked/pbo possibilities (or manual overclocking). Better re-sale value too, with out-of-the-box compatibility for Ryzen 3000 CPUs.

  • Get faster 3200Mhz memory which is similarly priced

  • 5-10% faster and more power efficient (+ thermally efficient) GPU. Keep in mind, for WOW

  • A better quality PSU. The EVGA BR is an entry level unit (or a budget pull) and a better fit for lesser power overwhelmed builds.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £114.78 @ Aria PC
Motherboard MSI B450-A PRO MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £79.98 @ Amazon UK
Memory Kingston HyperX Fury 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £70.70 @ Amazon UK
Storage Samsung 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For £0.00
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For £0.00
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER 4 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card £165.97 @ Scan.co.uk
Case Zalman Z9 Plus ATX Mid Tower Case -
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £52.97 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit -
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £484.40
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-16 17:00 GMT+0000

If you prefer the 2700X for any particular reason and want to stay within budget, grab a RX 570 card (https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/tyNypg/gigabyte-radeon-rx-570-4gb-gaming-4g-video-card-gv-rx570gaming-4gd). For this type of game the RX 570 is adequate and capable of achieving 60fps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ROG gaming build"

  • 14 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm still trying to decide which brand CPU i should go with.

To determine which CPU is best:

1). Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

2). Are you looking to manually overclock and is the possibility of overclocking an absolute requirement?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming PC around $750. Thanks"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

Yes it can be overclocked with potentially a nice return in performance. https://www.techpowerup.com/review/evga-geforce-rtx-2060-ko/33.html

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming PC around $750. Thanks"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

It's certainly capable, but for 1440p gaming i'd look to secure a little more power on the GPU side of things.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $119.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $78.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $69.95 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB KO GAMING Video Card $303.98 @ Newegg
Case darkFlash DLM 21 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $54.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $59.24 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $752.12
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-13 16:07 EST-0500

Keep in mind, to secure a 2060 graphics cards, one of the items trimmed was storage. 500GB is sufficient for the operating system, applications and a few gaming titles. You can always add more storage later. You may also desire an aftermarket cooler to uncap some of that CPU boost-potential - again something you can invest in later.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming PC around $750. Thanks"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

If the $750 spend excludes the operating system and peripherals:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $136.88 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M GAMING PLUS Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $89.97 @ Amazon
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $112.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB TUF GAMING OC Video Card $229.99 @ Amazon
Case Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $43.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.42 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $748.23
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-13 14:52 EST-0500

I threw in the above case as it's one of 2 cases i've tried under the $50 mark. Acrylic window.

There are supposedly better and a bunch of other under-$50 newer case options 'with tempered glass side panels' available. I haven't tried these myself so it would be a good idea to look to independent reviews/customer feedback. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/products/case/#t=7,6&sort=price&B=3,4&X=0,5072

If you're willing to go a little over $750: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Cjyqqs/darkflash-dlm-21-microatx-mid-tower-case-dlm-21-white

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinion needed mid tier build"

  • 15 days ago
  • 1 point

I just have have to pick out another case fan for added airflow.

The case comes with 2 fans pre-installed. For best/balanced airflow performance, you'll want 2 more fans. The arrangement being: x2 for exhaust (top and rear) and x2 for intake (on the front).

There's a ton of fan options to choose from but if you're looking for something that's just decent and affordable, these 140mm, PWM and acceptable acoustic range options work well:

or if you fancy case fans which somewhat resemble the cooler fans (or same brand/aesthetic), for a little extra:

I opted to get corsair ram sticks just for added looks and didn't have any reported quality issues or compatibility issues that came with some of the G.skill ones, plus it's smaller and has lights, and it has way more recent reviews. Also how do you check how large a ram stick is in length?

Length doesn't matter as all modules are within measure/compatibility. RAM height is only of concern when using these larger beefed up coolers which extend over the memory dimm slots and can clash with taller memory sticks. The Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro (height: 51mm) is actually taller than the G.Skill Vengeance V series (42mm). I would advise against going taller as you might run into problems. The cooler fan is adjustable to accommodate some additional clearance but 51mm is concerning.

With a closed off case (plain side panel) and a towering cooler which ultimately overshadows the memory sticks, I wouldn't bother with RGB or some of the fancier looking units. You'd be better off just grabbing a lesser towering kit with the likes of:

or

I'm also still looking for Wifi Adapters if you have any recommendations.

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/tTdqqs/gigabyte-wireless-network-card-gcwb867di

or even better, you could opt for a mobo with integrated WIFI (comes with antennas included):

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First gaming and streaming build £1000"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

No problem - 240fps it is :)

This will be achievable with a Ryzen 3600X + 2060 SUPER on lower/med settings. With streaming in the mix, there will be some performance penalty, although at all-low-presets (visual quality compromise) it's possible. Alternatively, you could grab a more superior graphics card which does marginally raise the budget ceiling (something like test19 suggests). This can be achieved by sticking with the 3600X, eg:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor £189.00 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £99.95 @ AWD-IT
Memory Kingston HyperX Fury 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £67.42 @ Amazon UK
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £94.49 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card £449.98 @ CCL Computers
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case £59.99 @ Box Limited
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £60.97 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £9.69 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £9.69 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1041.18
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-13 02:02 GMT+0000

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinion needed mid tier build"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

I kind of want to stick with the cooler I chose since it’s somewhat newer compared to a lot of older ones

Fair play! The DRP4 is a fantastic cooler hence no complaints here :)

I also switched to a 32gb ram just for the better use.

You don't 'need' 32GB of RAM for simultaneous gaming and browsing (or other lesser multi-tasked memory intense workloads). Although, considering RAM is more affordable nowadays it does make for a decent investment for forthcoming possibilities. Nothing wrong with spending a little more to double up but it's down to user preference and not an 'absolute requirement'.

Ram: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/kXbkcf/gskill-memory-f43200c16d32gvk

These sticks will do the job. Just keep in mind, these sticks carry a height @ 42mm and at stock the coolers pre-installed 120mm fan offers RAM clearance @ 40mm. The cooler fan is adjustable and will require a little lift to clear the sticks (compatible!).

Could you let me know if my parts like the motherboard are still par with a 32gb of a ram

No problems, the board is capable of running 64 gigs.

I’m kinda thinking about the case and on the fence about that too because of the front.

The front is where all the magic occurs. May not be everyone's cup of tea with the design language but with a full mesh front + case intake fans you can expect better cooling performance. Essentially, higher volumes of cooler air pulled from the outside, through the front mesh and directly towards the cooler = best performance! There are other case options with a similar front mesh design, if interested. The reason for recommending this case (or similar) is the ambient temp concerns highlighted in your initial post. I should also add, with cooling maximisation in mind, the Meshify C is one of my all-time favourite cases and does a pretty fine and dandy job for the asking price.

Kind of on the fence about about the PSu, could you explain how it’s a bit better than the one I chose please.

Both the G2 and G3 units from EVGA are 'good' units and will get the job done regardless of what I or anyone else suggests. Also, fully compatible with your build with no real concerns of failure or performance degradation with high risks. You're already in good hands.

Whether you can do better with the same amount of spend is where the following may be of use:

  • The G3 model is technically a G2 unit (EVGAs previous model), but trimmed down a little to achieve a smaller footprint. Not sure exactly why EVGA chose to introduce the G3 with a reduced form factor from an already decent performing standard sized G2. I'm guessing either to cut cost or maybe making things easier for case builders when managing cables in tighter spots (i.e. under PSU shrouds, other obstacle clearance, etc). Nah, i'm sticking with cutting costs as all standard units are more than workable in those close knit environments.

  • Going small comes at a cost. The G2 was known to be more audible compared to some of the other finer units. The G3 was forced to deploy a smaller and louder fan, which for me was a deal-breaker. In fact, at first I had assumed some fault in the fan bearing or maybe some hindrance. Silly me, I RMA'd the bugger in pursuit of a remedy and should have checked user feedback/reviews first. I guess the G2 success put the G3 in high hopes. The replacement was far from remedial, it was what it was, an invasively loud fan. Unfortunate for my brother, who was loaned my G2, was surprised with a G3 unit locked in his rig lol... doesn't matter his gaming build runs loud anyway and he wears headphones so makes no difference to him.

  • Later released in-depth reviews also highlighted other cut backs. The G3 lost some of it's better efficiency banding which was maintained on the G2 model and a couple other protection feature snags. These issues for the vast majority of buyers is of no real concern as these benched/stressed reviews are conducted in the most volatile and synthetically load-intensive runs. Not the the type of environment users (or gamers) are expected to advance on.

  • Another aspect, in my experience, is the poorly addressed eco-mode (EVGAs thermal control mechanism which keeps the fan idling on lower/moderate power consumption/workloads). Both of my landed G3 models didn't kick in quick enough whilst under-load and I could literally sense things getting a little too hot for my liking (on idle-state). This was realised by placing my hands over the rear exhaust vent. The G2, when tested in the same manner, proved more effective with the fan kicking in with immediate effect. I haven't seen any user/review complaints in the same regard hence it's possible newer G3 batches may have ironed out certain inconsistencies (or i haven't bothered to check since reverting back to G2). I have the bros G3 running all the time with the eco-mode switched off.

  • In 2017 and early 2018, what gave virtue to the G2/G3 models was the really well-received competitive pricing - which is one of the reasons the G3 gained popularity. Even I was willing to look past some of the finer units to save some cash. Both units were £30/more cheaper than the RMx/TXm/Seasonic Gold Plus/etc. The competitive cost alone was enough to drive massive sales and a huge boost in user satisfaction. Here in 2020, that is no longer the case. I wouldn't mind throwing a $100+ @ the G2 but the G3, nah, it's overpriced IMO!! Earlier competitively priced success has paid off for EVGA and a hot selling product with good reviews is a perfect business opportunity to raise profit margins.

Bottom line: i'm not so fussed with most of the above but the G3's noise-levels alone is a massive deal breaker for me. The G3 is still a decent unit but in my opinion for $109 you can do better!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinion needed mid tier build"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

(oops thought i had submitted the post already - it just sat there collecting dust)

For your specific requirements, the 2700X looks to be an excellent road-worthy choice.

Although I have to admit, 73c @ idle seems more like a non-idle condition (check task manager processes) or hardware concern (poorer quality or loosely mounted cooler, weak/cracked paste, not enough air-pull/push, choked case, etc). You might want to download a monitoring tool to check for voltage overrides and clockspeed scalability too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First gaming and streaming build £1000"

  • 16 days ago
  • 2 points

With a 240hz panel in the mix, the performance ambition demands nippier single threaded speeds, fast RAM and the best GPU the budget is capable of affording. For this type of requirement, i'd grab a Ryzen 3600X (CPU resources predominantly for gaming) and use the GPU's hardware encoder for streaming (1080p basic quality output). You're always going to experience performance hits on the gaming side with streaming or other simultaneous workloads. With this type of hardware encoded arrangement, those performance hits are lessened but likewise streaming higher quality content or higher resolution output is challenged.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor £189.00 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £99.95 @ AWD-IT
Memory Crucial Ballistix RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory £89.99 @ Amazon UK
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £94.49 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC Video Card £349.99 @ Amazon UK
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case £59.99 @ Box Limited
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £60.97 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £9.69 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan £9.69 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £963.76
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-12 17:36 GMT+0000

Alternatively, if you fancy keeping encoding options alive on both ends, with CPU based software encoding + GPU based hardware encoding, you have the option of grabbing a Ryzen 2700X (8 core / 16 thread CPU). Just keep in mind, software encoding places plenty of strain on CPU resources and does impact game performance quite considerably. If you're looking to shoot past 144fps, in most games it may prove difficult unless in-game configurations are set to an all-time low across the board.

The other thing I was wandering about is whether you're better off saving money and sticking with a 144hz panel. Maybe spend a little more on the build side of things. Graphically intense games barely hit over 160fps at the lowest of settings. You'd be limited to a select number of popular lesser demanding games on a mix of low and medium presets to achieve the 200fps+ target. For me (imo), anything above 144fps is over-rated anyway and only makes sense for hardcore competitive players (esports/or whatnot) with superman reflexes. Anyway, its down to user preference and if it serves purpose, pull the trigger.

EDIT: operating system required? Also feel free to select a case of your choosing, the one added above was a quick decent select for the asking price. Plenty of other superb cases available at a similar price range.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Buying a Graphics Card This Week (US)"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

I wouldn't worry so much about custom branding as all of these second-phase manufactures/tweakers use the same Nvidia (primary brand) reference architecture. Alongside ASUS, there are several other partner brands which produce excellent end-products, with the likes of EVGA, MSI, GIGABYTE, ZOTAC, etc. What you can expect from partner cards is slightly better cooling, improved components/factory overclocking with slightly nippier performance and accordingly, optimised power delivery. Most of these 1660 super cards from partner brands are similar in design and performance hence a difficult task in determining which is best. I would look to user feedback for some added confidence!

I'm familiar with the following 2 models (through recent builds + tested/benched). Both are fantastic:

ZOTAC: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/sFZzK8/zotac-geforce-gtx-1660-super-6-gb-gaming-amp-video-card-zt-t16620d-10m

EVGA: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/GzPgXL/evga-geforce-gtx-1660-super-6-gb-sc-ultra-gaming-video-card-06g-p4-1068-kr

If you prefer ASUS, this one seems equally favourable with plenty of SOLID reviews:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/CH4BD3/asus-geforce-gtx-1660-super-6-gb-tuf-gaming-oc-video-card-tuf-gtx1660s-o6g-gaming

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube