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Comment reply on Kyndle's Completed Build: First PC Build ($800)

  • 78 months ago
  • 3 points

seconded. it's a good idea to always place the GPU in the top slot whenever possible, as it often always is the slot with the most dedicated bandwidth.

Comment reply on CarterBond's Completed Build: First Build-Gaming AMD FX 8350 GTX 660 NZXT Switch 810

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

i have an AMD CPU and i concur.

Comment reply on thesunofsansebastian's Completed Build: Ragnarok

  • 78 months ago
  • 7 points

Thuban was a good time for AMD.

you have my +1 on such a nice build for a modest fee.

Comment reply on MrBeastshaw's Completed Build: $320 Ksl PC

  • 78 months ago
  • 3 points

sheesh, $320 is what i'd pay for the motherboard and both RAM sticks alone...

please don't come by my place.

Comment reply on MrBeastshaw's Completed Build: First Build (Learning the ropes)

  • 78 months ago
  • 4 points

not too bad, although you don't need 16GB of RAM for gaming. i realize you bought this stuff in a bundle (and for $500, that's stellar), but you probably could've saved enough to get an FX-6300 (arguably the best price-to-performance processor on the market) had you downgraded to two 4GB sticks.

a little bit of research goes a long way. :)

Comment reply on eddystoner15's Completed Build: first pc/ game machine

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

i can testify that an HD5750 is decent enough for gaming at medium to high settings (depending on the game), assuming that you don't have your resolution set to anything over 1600x900. i had it attached to a Celeron dual-core and it ran the first Crysis maxed out at around 30 fps.

btw: you did good on the parts selection. just tidy up those internal power cables a bit, if you can (probably why you have such a low rating - we around PCPP are quite sensitive to cable management).

Comment reply on No7x's Completed Build: Blue Beast

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

i don't think a Sandy i3, 16GB of RAM, a 660Ti, a 700W PSU from a not-so-reputable maker, and a full retail disk of Win7 HP were very good choices for a gaming PC, especially one that costs $1400 with the peripherals. there is quite a bit of room for some price reduction while getting more appropriate, quality components.

Comment reply on AACJenius's Completed Build: Speed Ångel

  • 78 months ago
  • 2 points

4.4 at 86C max is a good overclock for Haswell, but don't feel bad if you can't get any higher. Haswell, as far as i've heard, is very hit-and-miss with overclocking, where some processors can reach the upper-4's on air while others barely struggle with the lower-4's even with something like an H100i. my guess is that you got yourself an average 4770K, which in and of itself should last you a few generations before you'd need an upgrade.

Comment reply on KendallShpendal's Completed Build: The Animus (First Build)

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

ah, i see. in that case, disregard that bit from my comment. overall, it's a very stellar build :)

Comment reply on KendallShpendal's Completed Build: The Animus (First Build)

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

no complaints on my end, although i personally would've gone with at least 2 4GB sticks of RAM, which aren't much more expensive than a single 8GB stick and it doubles the effective memory bandwidth (though it doesn't do much overall, it's just good practice overall to take advantage of performance benefits wherever possible).

Comment reply on st3's Completed Build: Frankensteined Media Server

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

hey: some of the best builds, in my opinion, are ones made from recycled parts, because that just means they're good for more than being scrap... and what better use for a three-year-old system like that than to use it in something simple like a media server?

you have my +1, good sir :)

Comment reply on fotoden's Completed Build: Gaming & Graphics PC for ~$1000

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i'm assuming those HDDs in the picture are recycled from an older build; if that's so, then props to you for making an exceptional system for only $1000 not including the OS.

+1 for fantastic clean cable management.

Comment reply on brpeden82's Completed Build: Intel Core i5 3570k/7870 XT Myst/Define R4

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

it says he had issues with the Nvidia cards. i've heard that some Nvidia cards with recent drivers (early 320 series, i think) would simply crash, causing the screen to flicker before coming back online. the newest drivers shouldn't do that, though, and i haven't had anything bad happen to my GTX570 since installing it.

Comment reply on ratchet26's Completed Build: Ratchet26's ASRock Z77

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

everything seemed okay... until i saw the $1200 monitor. doesn't seem like a build of this price range would benefit from it, especially with a 2GB GTX670. if you wanted IPS, i can understand that, but there are far less expensive IPS panels that provide a similar experience, even if you'd need to sacrifice the screen space.

Comment reply on rkitover's Completed Build: Nice, inexpensive Haswell PC

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i'm not sure Haswell's HD Graphics will benefit from faster RAM like an AMD APU does, but for $400 total it ain't bad. try looking into clearing those wires from the CPU fan; i'm concerned the fan might catch on one of those cables eventually.

Comment reply on roawh's Completed Build: AMD-FX 6300 <$600 First Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

it's always good practice to place the graphics card in the uppermost x16 slot if possible, as it's almost always wired for the full x16 bandwidth provided by the board - the exception being, of course, if a lower slot was populated and the chipset split the bandwidth between them.

Comment reply on roawh's Completed Build: AMD-FX 6300 <$600 First Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

for including the OS into the budget and still remaining under $600, i commend your efforts. my only complaint is that you should move that graphics card up to the upper PCI-E slot because the x4 bandwidth delivered to the lower slot is likely choking that HD7770.

Comment reply on DH28Hockey's Completed Build: First Build, 4670k and 7970

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

try using MSI Afterburner for your GPU overclocking. other than that, it's a good build.

Comment reply on LookTopHats's Completed Build: Old Build... Restoration Project

  • 79 months ago
  • 4 points

well, when that time comes, you know where to find us :D

Comment reply on boomerangfreak's Completed Build: my first pc build

  • 79 months ago
  • 0 points

i can't understand why...

Comment reply on LookTopHats's Completed Build: Old Build... Restoration Project

  • 79 months ago
  • 9 points

lol Pentium 4 XD

fixing old computers was how i got started, too, and this was a great place for you to start. hopefully next time you'll be able to show us something not from 2001 :)

Comment reply on hippiedude5's Completed Build: The poonslayer 9000+

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

dual-GPU configurations probably won't need more than 800W max, even if you throw in a couple more hard drives. a 1000W unit would easily have sufficed, but there's nothing wrong with a little bit of extra security.

for some reason, PCPartPicker won't allow me to add a third GTX770 - i'm guessing that's a motherboard limitation, because all GTX X70 series allow for three-way configurations, provided the motherboard supports that. either way, two-way 770s would last you at least a few good years

Comment reply on issac94's Completed Build: My First 8350 / 7970

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i was running 4.5GHz stable with +0.05V CPU voltage and 22.5x multiplier, but due to temperatures under Prime95 (65+C using Hyper 212 EVO) i only run that frequency if i know i won't be pushing it higher than 50-60 percent. i also tried a 4.2GHz standard overclock (no turbo, 21x multi) at stock voltage with just a slight increase in temperature.

i have a Gigabyte motherboard, and for the voltage functions i can either add or subtract from the standard voltage (i think it's 1.35V). i'm not sure how it is with the Sabertooth board, but if it sets an exact voltage try setting the lowest voltage you can before any core shows errors while stress-testing. since i had a sucessful 4.5 OC with a +0.05V bump, that would mean your standard voltage should be 1.4V if the Sabertooth behaves like that.

as for temperatures, AMD recommends temperatures under 62C at a full load, though you should be safe up through 65C; anything over 70C is not good with an AMD CPU, and you should probably set your motherboard to warn you if it hits 70C. thankfully, Prime95 is an extreme worst-case situation, and regular temperatures should stay below 60C at a nominal (50%) load.

Comment reply on issac94's Completed Build: My First 8350 / 7970

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

nice selection for a higher-end AMD build. you might want to consider another stick of RAM for the faster dual-channel memory mode.

for your overclocking concern, you probably have your voltage a bit high. try dropping it down to the lowest it can go without any of the threads failing after the first two Prime tests. i managed to drop several degrees by turning down the voltage with the same frequency settings on my 8350.

also, bear in mind that AMD's temperature sensors might be wonky (they are largely inaccurate at temperatures below 45C). try taking the temperatures from the socket sensor instead; if it's within a few degrees at load, then you should be good.

Comment reply on PSN_6699's Completed Build: 2nd Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 2 points

firstly, unless you're doing something other than gaming, an i7 is not preferred, mostly because games right now rarely use more than three threads. some exceptions, such as Battlefield 3 and Crysis 3, can still perform exceptionally well with fewer threads as GPU limits will be reached well before the CPU limits.

secondly, the case has cable management options, which should've been used during the assembly of the build. not only would this help improve case temperatures by a few degrees and clear space inside for air to move around, it would also make any future upgrades much more manageable and the inside would not look like a tornado performed the hookups.

thirdly, that second PCI-E slot is wired for only 8 lanes of PCI-E bandwidth and, by my observations, nothing would prevent you from moving the GPU to the top slot; while this technically isn't an issue with PCI-E 3.0, it's a good habit to get into, as it's considered a good practice to allocate the GPU to the greatest number of PCI-E lanes possible.

Comment reply on VnXsL's Completed Build: First Time Build - Mini Me

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i like it all. were the parts recommended by Dr. Evil himself? :)

Comment reply on jrmcfa03's Completed Build: First build for gaming / live stream. ~800~

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

overall, not a bad choice of parts. i take it you bought that motherboard for the features?

the GTX 650 Ti isn't a bad card if you're looking to do near-max 1080p gaming at playable framerates - certainly not perfect, but it gets the job done. you may be surprised by how well mid-range graphics cards can game.

Comment reply on Deskjetser's Completed Build: Full AMD gaming PC build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

very well thought out and i love the color coordination. it's a tad expensive for an AMD system, but going red has its perks. do you have the memory at its advertised speed configuration?

Comment reply on zackza's Completed Build: My First Gaming Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

you have my +1. only thing i'd suggest differently would be slightly faster RAM, but that's just me being nitpicky.

Comment reply on evanmaster7's Completed Build: The Beast

  • 79 months ago
  • 4 points

for $4000, i was honestly expecting to see something along the lines of a quad-GPU setup. overpayed on CPU, MB, RAM... yeah, you grossly overpayed for pretty much everything for WoW.

something like a 4670K and a GTX760/HD7870 would've sufficed for this build

Comment reply on mdorn02's Completed Build: High-Mid range build

  • 79 months ago
  • -2 points

while i agree that an i5 is a good gamer's choice, there are games like Battlefield 3 and Crysis 3 that take advantage of multiple threads. however, the difference even them is minimal, especially with higher graphics.

Comment reply on ryanterrence's Completed Build: My First Custom Build Geared Towards Video Editing 09/15/2013

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

huh, on the site i got my information from, they claimed 62 is their recommended maximum, but hinted at higher temperatures being acceptable up to 70C. still, it's always a good idea to keep your processor nice and cool anyways (i've seen Intel CPUs get as hot as in the 80's... and they say AMD CPUs run hot :P )

Comment reply on ryanterrence's Completed Build: My First Custom Build Geared Towards Video Editing 09/15/2013

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i hope that 65C load temp is in Prime95, because AMD recommends a maximum temperature of 62C (although, to be honest, you can get away with a slightly higher temperature). also, you may want to re-investigate your idle temperature; AMD temperature sensors are wonky and inaccurate below 45C, so you'll have to take the idle temperature from the slightly less accurate socket sensor.

all in all, though, not a bad combination of parts for video editing. you should look into programs that take advantage of CUDA if you're gonna be using an Nvidia GPU

Comment reply on IllictionCustomPCs's Completed Build: New Gaming PC

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

your last point makes me wonder, too. hopefully OP can get back to us with a reasonable answer.

Comment reply on IllictionCustomPCs's Completed Build: New Gaming PC

  • 79 months ago
  • -1 points

locked i7 on nice Z87 motherboard? for gaming?

the RAM i can kind of understand, if the customer knows how to make and use a RAM disk (isn't too hard to do). 250GB of HDD space in a $1600 build is a bit lacking if you ask me. you probably could fit at least 2TB of storage space if it was properly re-balanced with less (and less expensive) RAM.

all in all, your customer doesn't need an i7 and 16GB for just gaming. shaving it to an i5-4670K and 8GB of RAM would bring at least $120 in savings, leaving room for an upgraded CPU cooler (like a Corsair H80i) and a higher-capacity HDD.

something tells me there's more to this build than the listed parts...

Comment reply on tenken08's Completed Build: Looks great just terrible cable management

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i've seen worse cable management. everything seems out of the way, so no concern about a rat's nest clogging up airflow. take a few moments to redo the cables to the GPU, and flip the power supply upside-down if you don't have a carpet floor.

Comment reply on shawnhl's Completed Build: First Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

people seem to be stuck with the notion that OCZ power supplies are not up to par, when a lot of the times that isn't entirely the case. for instance, i have a 600W StealthXstream II that i've been using for my personal build for the last 2, going on 3, years; i found a review on Hardwaresecrets that showed it delivered its advertised power and efficiency.

sure OCZ had some bad PSUs in the past, but the current lineup looks pretty good. i'd sure as hell take an OCZ power supply over, say, a Coolmax or Logisys unit.

Comment reply on dpack77's Completed Build: AMD-8350 Low-End Video Editing Machine

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

nice combination of parts, although i would hardly call this "low-end" by any stretch of the imagination.

Comment reply on shawnhl's Completed Build: First Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

impressive for only ~$550 including OS. that idle temp looks a bit high, but the load temp is acceptable given you only have a stock cooler.

also: i'm pretty certain someone will complain about your choice of power supply. the OCZ Fatal1ty series is one of their better series, so don't feel bad about getting it. as long as it isn't pushed too hard (your system components shouldn't stress it that much), then it should serve you well

Comment reply on dshojaat's Completed Build: High End Gtx 770 Build By A 13 Year Old

  • 79 months ago
  • 3 points

that's what i've been hearing. i guess more people recommend the Hyper 212 due to its popularity.

Comment reply on dshojaat's Completed Build: High End Gtx 770 Build By A 13 Year Old

  • 79 months ago
  • 2 points

the Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO is an excellent starter choice. it's cheap ($30) and it keeps my FX-8350 in the 50s at load.

Comment reply on Bobpersonmanguy's Completed Build: High End Parent Build/My first build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

most people will assume that, since it's fast, it's "high-end", so Desekrezer is right. they don't know or care about what's inside the machine, so long as it works and works well enough. anything that exceeds expectations they'll of course give it more praise than us knowledgeable people would.

Comment reply on remmiz06's Completed Build: Speed Demon

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i'm asking that myself. OP could easily have gotten an HD7970 and an additional 3TB hard drive with plenty of cash to spare if he/she hadn't bought two Intel SSDs and 16GB of low-speed RAM.

Comment reply on liquidarchon's Completed Build: Kristen ($1200 GAMING PC)

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

that's good, then. a bit surprising, but good nonetheless. you should be able to take it to at least 4.6 with that kind of load temperature, maybe even 5.

Comment reply on liquidarchon's Completed Build: Kristen ($1200 GAMING PC)

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

i've seen quite a few more AMD-based builds on here recently (at least three today), but this one gets extra points from me for being very well color-coordinated.

unless you were reading from a known good hardware monitoring utility, i would take that load temperature of 90F (~32C) with a grain of salt. AMD's on-die temperature sensors are usually inaccurate below 45C, so you need to look at readings from both the CPU and the motherboard (particularly the socket temperature), and i bet the Crosshair V has plenty of sensory circuitry built into it, being an enthusiast motherboard and all.

Comment reply on Skandranonsg's Completed Build: Freki

  • 79 months ago
  • 3 points

glad to see the Node 304 is child-proof :D

Comment reply on NavasC471's Completed Build: AMD Titan Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

lol yeah, that might be a problem...

Comment reply on NavasC471's Completed Build: AMD Titan Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

if your motherboard has consistent socket temperature sensors that are within a reasonable range from the ambient, i suggest taking that idle temperature instead of the one from the CPU, else you'll end up confusing a lot of people who don't know any better

Comment reply on NavasC471's Completed Build: AMD Titan Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

okay good, because i've got Crucial Tracers and i know those things are lower than Vengeance sticks.

Comment reply on NavasC471's Completed Build: AMD Titan Build

  • 79 months ago
  • 2 points

wow, first build i've seen here that uses the new V8-GTS. i was planning on getting that instead of a Corsair H80i if i could, due to the simpler nature of an air cooler.

it looks like you're using high RAM heatsinks. how's the clearance with the CPU cooler?

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add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube