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Guide

A10-7870K / GD09B HTPC

Description

We've worked with Newegg to put together this build guide. They kindly put together a combo deal for an extra $71.93 savings. Nice!

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.2462978

We've also put together a build video using the exact same parts as in the guide - you can find it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HhZ3Tf1myI

The HTPC build is powered by the AMD A10-7870K. This machine doesn’t require much processing power so the APU hits a nice sweet spot between price and performance while allowing you to add a dedicated graphics card for an improved gaming experience. The motherboard in this build is the ASUS A88X-PLUS. To ensure maximum compatibility with the case, having a motherboard with a front panel USB3.0 header was a must. With no dedicated graphics card in this build, a motherboard with an HDMI port was a requirement to transfer both audio and video to the screen without the need for adapters. Should you choose to add a TV Tuner card, you will find a PCIE x16 slot to accommodate nearly all potential form factors currently available.

As this is a budget build, and an HTPC, the memory requirement is fairly low. The system uses an 8GB kit of 2400MHz G.Skill Ripjaws X series memory. Without a graphics card in the system the gains from the higher clocked memory will be more noticeable and will allow for a seamless transition should a graphics card get added to the system at a later time.

The Silverstone GD09B is a gorgeous HTPC case that fits right into the décor of most home entertainment systems, while providing all sorts of features at an amazing price. Powering the system is a EVGA 550W power supply. While this HTPC only uses around 200W at full load, the deal on this PSU is simply too good to pass up. Finally, the part list includes a Blu-Ray drive from ASUS for all of your physical media.

Compatibility: No issues or incompatibilities found.

Component Selection Base Promo Shipping Tax Price Where
CPU AMD A10-7870K 3.9 GHz Quad-Core Processor
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CPU Cooler Cooler Master GeminII M4 58.4 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler
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Motherboard Asus A88X-PLUS ATX FM2+ Motherboard
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Memory G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR3-2400 CL11 Memory
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Storage Seagate Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
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Case Silverstone GD09B HTPC Case
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Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
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Optical Drive Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer
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Wireless Network Adapter Asus PCE-AC56 PCIe x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter
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Base Total: €57.95
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Total: €67.90

* PCPartPicker may receive compensation for purchases made at participating retailers linked on this site. This compensation does not affect what products or prices are displayed, or the order of prices listed. Learn more here.

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Comments

  • 58 months ago
  • 22 points

Based on the comments.... I have a feeling that they aren't getting what this build is supposed to be. Stuff like "Get a gpu and this CPU" Is silly because it's supposed to be HTPC not a gaming rig.. I mean the name practically gives you no way of misinterpreting it. As Manirelli stated this is a "high-end HTPC" which is why there are some high-quality and high-performing parts. Obviously it can be used as a gaming PC but that's not its purpose. I think once we take away the whole "I could do better for gaming" and we look at what its function is.... then I say we have a nice High end HTPC (Though... arguably they could have gone intel, lowered the budget a little and gotten something that made more sense :P).

I stated previously that this build is having an identity crisis and i still believe that but make no mistake It is a HTPC and Manirelli couldn't be any clearer.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Manirelli couldn't be any clearer.

True, but I gotta say you're right about the identity crisis: it just seems weird to me to have a 7870k when you can get all of the same HTPC-relevant GPU features (hardware encoders and decoders) and HSA with a lower GPU core count (and pay a lot less - $50 in my area) by getting a 7700k or a 7800. Personally, if I were going to build a HTPC, I'd snag a A10-8700P (yes, that's a 35w laptop APU) board for its better 4k support (H.265/HEVC) and improved video streaming ( http://www.extremetech.com/mobile/207229-207229 ). There's no difference between a 7870k and a 7850k other than clock rates: this is just like Intel's i3-4130 and i3-4160, so I see no reason to pay more for something that's "newer" if it fails to provide performance increases proportional to (or better than) the cost increase unless the performance requirement is mission-critical and cannot be met by the cheaper hardware. This is just my $0.02.

That being said, everyone will have their opinions, good ideas, and bad ideas about what computer hardware should be used to fulfill any given purpose - the expression of these opinions and ideas along with the relevant objective data and pricing is what makes the PCPP community great.

PS. I think that the people who are saying Stuff like "Get a gpu and this CPU" are seeing the $600+ price tag and thinking "I can make a rig with higher performance for that price by using these parts" instead of thinking "I could do just as well in terms of HTPC capability for 20% less".

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

That being said, everyone will have their opinions, good ideas, and bad ideas about what computer hardware should be used to fulfill any given purpose - the expression of these opinions and ideas along with the relevant objective data and pricing is what makes the PCPP community great.

And that's great! However don't start talking about how this is a gaming build when it's clearly not.

"I could do just as well in terms of HTPC capability for 20% less".

Right and then you could arguably say this guide doesn't focus on them.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

However don't start talking about how this is a gaming build when it's clearly not.

Never said it was, nor compared it to one. Other people did. I compared Desktop Godavari to Laptop Carrizo for HTPC purposes.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I meant the thread as a whole not you. I tried to edit it but it was too late.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah, that's happened to me before. lol

  • 58 months ago
  • 5 points

This is essentially a cheap gaming pc ment for 40 fps 1080p gaming/console killer.

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  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

the deal on this PSU is simply too good to pass up.

I guess.... The Seasonic's deal was not good enough too keep :P

  • 58 months ago
  • 5 points

Both good deals. I think I just copied over the wrong writeup. We went over a couple iterations for this build. Mondays can be tough.

  • 58 months ago
  • 3 points

We went over a couple iterations for this build.

Really? So you guys have a an entire process for this stuff? That's good to hear.

Mondays can be tough.

You have no idea ;)

  • 58 months ago
  • 3 points

Contrary to what some people believe, I don't just spin a spinner or pick parts out of a hat ;)

  • 58 months ago
  • 7 points

OMG you should live stream that! Build A PC with parts you picked out of a hat!

  • 58 months ago
  • 7 points

This would actually make for quite a fun video. I'd watch it, for sure.

  • 58 months ago
  • 3 points

I second that! I think it would be fun!

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

The 550 watt is an overkill. You also do not need the cpu cooler because the 7870k cooler is good enough.

  • 58 months ago
  • 0 points

As is the 3TB HDD.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, but that could be nice for an extreme amount of photos and videos.

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

WAY overkill for something you're just gonna watch movies on.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Where'd the comments criticizing the guide go?

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

Previous version. I accidentally used an older version with the wrong PSU. Part updates trigger a new version and add to the history. Nothing malicious, just a mistake on my end yesterday that someone pointed out.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

What's wrong with the cheap gigabyte pci wireless network card? Did you just want to keep the Asus brand the theme?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Which model are you referring to?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Can't speak for Qaudforce, but I believe this may be the one he meant: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-wireless-network-card-gcwb867di

Looks like it has all the same features, and is cheaper to boot.

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

Not currently available on Newegg. Can't have a bundle if the part is sold out or unavailable.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh god I haven't been on here in forever, ya I picked mine up when it was in stock through other retailers.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

This looks pretty good but I would guess this could be a lot more cost efficient

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure as hell could be!

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

XD

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 for left shark

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Can it be upgraded to a add another gpu for gaming

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep!

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh, man. You people need to SERIOUSLY learn how Power Supplies WORK! Save money on a sweet deal for a 550 Watt PSU, only using 200 Watts, will cost you $48.29 EXTRA per month in Electricity costs - assuming the PC is run 12 hours per day at a cost of $0.1315 per Kw. Saving money, NO. Paying extra: Yes! Think before you buy, please.

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

Having a larger PSU than your usage does not increase total power draw in that manner.

  • 58 months ago
  • 0 points

So, you're trying to tell me that PSU don't naturally have a negative power efficiency? Because I know for a fact that you're wrong because when i swapped out my PSU from my 650 Watt PSU to a 330 Watt PSU when I was only using 263 Watts, and saved $23 per month on my Electric bill - instantly and forever.

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  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

anecdotal

OMG Mani... you used my word!!!

As to Anthony.

Power supplies (specifically PC power supplies) work by converting AC to DC power to use within said computer. Whether your power supply is 1000w or 500w your power supply will only draw what you need.

I believe the misunderstanding is the efficiency of said power supply and i believe this is why you saved money. Take a gold rated power supply with an efficiency of 88% (I'm using a flat rate here) at 1000w. If you're drawing 330w (Once again using a flat rate it obviously fluctuates) then your power supply is drawing about 370w from the wall and then converting it (Which is what the efficiency rating is stating).

Now if you use the 500w PSU with a bronze rating of 82% and you're drawing once again 330w, the power supply will actually draw 390 watts (actually 389.6). The lower wattage and efficiency power supply is actually drawing more power then the higher wattage power supply. This is what power supply efficiency is and I believe you're misunderstanding.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Something else to keep in mind is that the efficiency of the unit is measured at specific loads. You can generally look up an efficiency curve for each unit on the manufacturer product page.

  • 58 months ago
  • 0 points

Well, I learned how the actual science works and power usage works from reading up on how people were using the Titan GTX with 450 and 500 Watt PSUs in Small Form Factor builds on initial release. Despite the fact that Nvidia recommended a minimum of 650 Watt PSU.

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

That has almost nothing to do with efficiency. The reason people can use those power supplies with a Titan is because manufacturers list higher wattage units to be absolutely 100% sure you have enough headroom in your system for all your components. It is an educated guess.

This is why we show you a rough idea of what your actual power usage is on our site. We can see the whole picture and allow you to make a more informed decision when purchasing.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm interested in an HTPC build however what software do we exactly use if we are going to be using it for media/tvshows/movies etc. Also what's stopping me from just using my laptop instead. What's the benefit of using this exactly?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

For users with large storage setups in a NAS or similar setup a laptop likely won't have the processing power or required amount of RAM to handle the setup.

The software is up to you. There are lots of options out there. Some people use XBMC, PLEX, or go crazy with FreeNAS setups and different front end programs.

The way you utilize your HTPC is mostly up to you, how much storage you have, and your needs for the system and data availability.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Check out Kodibuntu too.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, it's back with a fan that fits the case!

I would totally buy this.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

550 watts is over kill but there is growing room he could have gone with the evga 430 watts 80+ silver but it is a nice build.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Will this build support windows server 2012 std OS installation and run effectively on it? If not, can you provide specs for a low cost build for windows server 2012 std OS, req is for a small scale business of 5 users.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I would suggest posting in the create a part list for me forum.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm really looking for something to bring to LANs and play CS:GO. Would this suffice at 1080p 60FPS?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

For CSGO, I would look at my entry level build guide. You can try and swap out the case to something smaller.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

How would this HTPC handle a game like DOTA 2 at 1080p?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks like it can play DOTA2 but some settings may need to be turned down to maintain 60+ fps

http://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/2032-amd-a10-7870k-apu-review-benchmarks/Page-2

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah good to know. Thank you! :D

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Personally this is one of the best HTPC builds you can buy and i would agree it is a console killer not counting the price feature because you can die down some of the hardware to get the same price as a ps4 or xbox one and get better frames i think this is a great build but you can defiantly flex on the power supply for sure i don't know why some of these comments sound really stupid as if people are talking out there asses but nice build dude and its defiantly worth every penny.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

RAM speed is in MHz not Hz

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Oops! Updated.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

VERY overkill for an HTPC. Could do some gaming too.

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

hello

  • 58 months ago
  • -2 points

you could have gotton a better build by using a 750ti or a r7260x ,and make the cpu a fx 6300

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

This build is a HTPC as in Home Theater Personal Computer. An HTPC isn't intended to pack a wallop like a desktop but more of a "media center". Why spend more than twice the amount of a HTPC (such as this one) for watching movies on a smartTV that's 47", 1080p @120Hz when you can get an HTPC(such as this one), maybe a soundcard and maybe a GPU, and get whatever adapters to work with your existing flatscreen TV which already runs at 1080p or even at 720p?

The HTPC is meant to be at home in the living room. Watch Youtube, stream videos at HD and higher resolutions and maybe even expand your capacity for gaming by getting a GPU such as a GTX960, GTX750 or GTX660.

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  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm in an older vid with an R4 and 8350 as well ;)

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  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Quite a few of the videos use my hands and philips voice.

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  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

It got updated. I had the wrong PSU in the part list. When you change a part it creates a new version.

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