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Gaming/Streaming PC around $1500 (Would like some RGB)

RealistGinga
  • 18 months ago

My son is a big gamer, and he live streams all the time. He used to play on his pc however it got too slow. It was just a mid range lenovo pc w/ a low end graphics card. So for Christmas this year, I wanna build his (and my) first PC with him! I had a list made together last year, however I haven't done much research about the new graphics cards that have came out since. I was going to go with a gtx 1080, but from what I have gathered, the RTX 2070 is a little better? I was also into the Meshify C case due to the good airflow and cable management however, if you come up with something better I will check it out! I'm looking around the $1500 price range, however it could be a little above if needed.

I did a TON of research about a year ago, but have literally forgot almost everything lol. I did make my own build, however I would like other options. Here is mine to compare or if you think it's good enough?

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/gkXQNQ

Thanks!

Comments

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

You don't need such an expensive cpu cooler and motherboard if your not going to overclock unless you just like the look. That's just something to keep in mind. Also I would suggest getting corsair LL fans for rgb because they look really good. I personally like corsairs vengeance ram more too, but that's just my opinion. Good parts list though

the ram - https://pcpartpicker.com/product/vfDJ7P/corsair-vengeance-rgb-pro-16gb-2-x-8gb-ddr4-3200-memory-cmw16gx4m2c3200c16w

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

I wanted to future proof it, my son may not know how to do all of that now. However as he gets a little older he may learn how to. That's why i was going with the 8700k instead of just the 8700. I figured if we built this PC now, it would last for many years to whereas he would just need minor upgrades along the years. and still have a pretty decent PC.

Thank you for the suggestion! I will look into it!

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, the 2070 is a bit better than the 1080, and it isn't much more expensive. The Meshify C is a great case, and you could totally go with that, but if he likes RGB I recommend the 460X. Doesn't have the best airflow but it comes with three RGB fans and obviously, RGB is more important than airflow since it has a direct impact on FPS /s. I wasn't going to put the RGB SSD in, but in terms of price/gb it's actually pretty good and there are certainly worse SSDs. Trident Z RGB was a no-brainer. I chose that kit because it was the cheapest 16 gb, RGB kit over 3000 Mhz not including that hideous Skywalker stuff. Finally, my pick for CPU was because I really don't think the 8700k/9700k can justify pricing compared to the 2700. Also, the extra threads will help for streaming.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $279.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $84.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Asus - Prime X470-Pro ATX AM4 Motherboard $158.27 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $124.99 @ Newegg
Storage Team - T-FORCE DELTA RGB 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $119.99 @ Newegg
Storage Hitachi - Deskstar 7K2000 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $53.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $498.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Corsair - Crystal 460X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case $109.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $78.20 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1508.41
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-29 08:20 EST-0500
  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Balance of performance (and RGB)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $279.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler $38.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus - ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard $109.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $114.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $58.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card *Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING OC Video Card $749.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master - MasterBox MB511 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case $77.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1581.82
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-29 22:16 EST-0500
  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3 GHz 8-Core Processor $179.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - MasterAir MA410P 66.7 CFM CPU Cooler $39.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus - ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard $109.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $124.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $127.96 @ Amazon
Video Card *Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING OC Video Card $749.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master - MasterBox MB511 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case $77.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Antec - Earthwatts Gold Pro 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $41.00 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1461.79
Mail-in rebates -$10.00
Total $1451.79
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-29 22:44 EST-0500
  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Why not the Ryzen 7 2700?

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

At the time of my post, there was a $100 difference in price between the 1700 and 2700.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Performance there for gaming and simultaneous streaming, let AMD Ryzen turbo tech do its thing with RGB cpu cooler and link up extra rear RGB case fan i added to CPU coolers controller for multiple synchronised RGB effects.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $329.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - MasterLiquid ML240R RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $89.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus - Prime X470-Pro ATX AM4 Motherboard $169.89 @ B&H
Memory ADATA - XPG GAMMIX D10 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $114.99 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $74.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $58.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $498.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C TG ATX Mid Tower Case $74.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.60 @ Amazon
Case Fan Cooler Master - MasterFan MF120R ARGB 59 CFM 120mm Fan $19.48 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1501.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-30 04:59 EST-0500
  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

32 Gb ram is Absolutely and Completely Overkill, and you went 100$ over budget

  • 18 months ago
  • 0 points

Simple - remove the extra RAM and it's on budget. ps - 32 GB is just futureproofing, even 8 GB is becoming the new 4 GB

  • 18 months ago
  • 0 points

Hello RealistGinga. This build is over budget, but it is very nice and future-proof, and to make up for the price difference, I will give you a step by step guide on how to overclock your CPU and graphics card.

Here's the Build: PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $369.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Corsair - H115i RGB PLATINUM 97 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $169.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus - ROG Strix Z370-H Gaming ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $159.08 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $124.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $58.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Black Video Card $499.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT - H500i (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $99.00 @ B&H
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $75.88 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1650.80
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $1630.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-29 21:35 EST-0500

Here's the guide.

CPU overclocking,

  1. There are a few ways to do this. I have found one that does not involve going into the bios, which, IMO, is a pain. You will want to go to the Intel Website and download the "Intel Extreme Tuning Utility"
  2. Once it is downloaded onto the computer. start it up, and click on whatever comes up to your liking :)
  3. You will get a screen displaying all of your hardware specs. We don't use this. Go to the "All Utilities" Page, which is on the left side of the screen.
  4. you need to set a base clock, this should be something simple, like 100Mhz. 100Mhz is .1 GHz.
  5. Then you need to look down towards the multipliers. This is how many times 100Mhz is multiplied to give you a core clock. now, you want to start in small steps. Put the multiplier up by x1 for each of the cores, and click apply on the side of the screen.
  6. Now, you need to run a stress test. You can do this by going to the benchmark/Stress tab (IDK what they called, I haven't used it in a lil, i forgot) make the test 10 minutes long, and click start. Now wait 10 minutes, and do NOT leave the application.
  7. Keep increasing at x1 intervals until you get to a BSOD, or blue screen of death.
  8. Now it's time to increase the voltage. Make sure the voltage is set to adaptive, and move it up by .01 V
  9. You need to be very careful with this, voltage, when too high, ruins CPU's.
  10. Then try to make the multipliers higher, if it still BSOD's push the voltage up another .1, repeat until no BSOD, do not make the voltage over 1.32V, as this is very high, and only very avid Overclockers would usually go above. If you get a BSOD when both settings are at their limits, run another stress test. Make sure it doesn't get above 80 degrees Celsius. If it does, you need to cut back the voltage and/or multiplier until it doesn't anymore.

Your CPU cooler should be able to handle 4.5 GHz plus, as long as you are in a room temp room, or 72 degrees fahrenheit/ 22 degrees celsius, or below, and the case has solid airflow, meaning you have fans facing the right directions.

Hope i could help!

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Appreciate it!! I've noticed one thing I am curious about. Everybody includes a HDD... Is that just to store games on? I'm not a complete NOOB when it comes to PC's I have just recently got back into it (last time I was this deep, SSD didn't exist). My son isn't going to have that many files so I'm not sure that I want a HDD if it is not needed, also wouldn't it be best to have games stored on the SSD for faster loading? Is the M.2 that much noticeable in speed compared to just a 2.5" SSD ?

Thanks for any input

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Having an HDD is a great way to have a lot of storage for cheap. So if you have a lot of pictures, music, videos, or other bulk media, it is typically stored on the HDD since you don't need absolute speed for it. In the past, the more expensive SSD was used for holding the Operating System and the most important programs so that booting the computer and using the core functions would be very fast and responsive. As SSDs have gotten way cheaper over time, it has gotten to the point that the SSD can be used for pretty much everything except bulk media (photos, music, videos, etc.) or those games that are only ever touched every few months.

M.2 can offer better speed than a 2.5" SATA SSD, but many M.2 drives use the same data interface and the same data chips as their 2.5" SATA counterparts. As such, many M.2 drives are basically the exact same as a 2.5" SATA SSD just in a different form factor. There are some M.2 drives that use the data interface called NVMe, but their slightly higher speeds are usually only noticeable for rendering huge files. For gaming and streaming, the difference between an NVMe M.2 and SATA M.2 and SATA 2.5" can be considered negligible. Just go with the best balance of cost and ease of use. The M.2 form factor doesn't use cables, so it can be easier to manage while building, which is one of the big reasons it has become popular.

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

yeah, that is for mass storage, the SSD is for the important stuff, and the OS The M.2/NVMe's are extremely fast, and are far better than even SSd's

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