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Career choices

onseak

45 months ago

So, in 2014 I got into programming, after a semester I ran into some personal issues and ended up wasting money on alcohol and drugs. Anyways, I tried to retake the course this year but I found it way too boring, I already knew everything they were teaching, and exams to exempt from those classes were too expensive, so I just quit the career and focused on my work, which was the best choice because now I have a better position just because of my overall performance.

I've thought about giving another try to programming but I know it has no point. So I've been looking and since I get involved a lot in my work, a logistic related career should be the smartest choice. So next year I'll get the CAE and then I'm going to get into "Logistic Management" so I boost my efficiency on that area.

Regarding all of career choices, what are yours? Why? Do you see yourself being happy doing what you chose? If you went through a career and then changed, why was that?

Comments

  • 45 months ago
  • 3 points

I don't have an exciting reason as to why I chose my profession. I was in high school and did just what was necessary to pass, not working towards college credits. I chose to go into the IT field because during my HS years I spent way too much time on the computer, outside of the times on the weekends where I hung out with friends (same boring routine). My parents figured I should make something out of a computer degree, otherwise enlist in the Military.

My mindset at the time was definitely not set on joining the Military (young, lazy, not motivated). So I thought to myself that I'd go to college just to see if this is what I really want to do, if not, switch my profession. Two years later and I had my associates, still unsure about it all. I start working and really I just think of it as a paycheck, nothing more. Go to work, come home, and not really care about staying current with technology or reading up on it.

My first job was a call center for the air force, which lasted 11 months, and I found better opportunity elsewhere, as I didn't see myself moving up (or at a very slow pace for not much more money). My second job, working help desk (basically tier 2), paid a substantial amount more. That was 1.5 years and in those times I had two certifications under my belt: Security+ and Microsoft Windows 7. Right around the time of my last few months there, I wanted to go back to school and really get interested in computers, be it hardware, software, coding, anything. At the same time, I was transitioning to a new department (tier 3), thanks to knowing the lead and him wanting to take me on. I've been here for around 8 months and now have my MCITP Windows Server 2008 certification. Each place I have worked at has taught me a lot of which I didn't know previously.

I see a lot of people who do their job as just a paycheck and don't really strive to be better. You have to be hungry and always willing to learn, study on your own time, and practice. In the IT world at least, it's all about certifications. After I graduate in December, I'm going to continue on getting them. My next one I want is CEH (certified ethical hacker) and then go from there.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

I see a lot of people who do their job as just a paycheck and don't really strive to be better. You have to be hungry and always willing to learn, study on your own time, and practice.

This. A person without ambitions is just worthless. You have to look forward to get better things in life.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Each place I have worked at has taught me a lot of which I didn't know previously.

This is the best. If you're not learning (in a technical job anyways), your job is not good for you.

You have to be hungry and always willing to learn, study on your own time, and practice.

applause

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

At that same time, it got to a point in the first two jobs where I learned all I could for the work I did. I like where I'm at now, being a server admin, because here it isn't just one set job. You get to do everything server related like building physical/virtual servers, managing storage space, backups, disaster recovery, etc.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure. Unless a job is very dynamic, you'll reach a point where you master it. Then you need to decide if it is time to move on or not. I've definitely reached that point at several of my jobs.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

I've thought about giving another try to programming but I know it has no point.

How do you know it has no point? What does that mean? My career is in programming and it's been a very good choice for me. I started in software QA and moved into a developer role. I'd be happy doing either, as long as I have a good team to work with and a decent product (and I'm pretty flexible on the definition of "decent", so long as the work environment is good lol).

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

It makes no sense for me going back to college to face a way of teaching that is utterly boring and unnecessary, mainly because I have the knowledge enough to skip the first year, at least, and they wouldn't allow me to do that. I plan on having programming as my hobby, maybe I'll get more serious projects in the future on which I can throw my free time at.

I also believe that a proper team and environment improves productivity and efficiency in a big way. I'm a teamwork person, so I often depend on what the other thinks or do about something, and I ask my team whatever I think is a group decision.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Well sometimes when we want something from someone (the degree) we have to play by dumb rules (the classes you find super boring). Suffering through some boring classes shouldn't keep you from pursuing the career path if it is indeed the one you want.

You can of course always just become a programmer on your own and prove your merits by working on projects and developing a portfolio; the degree just helps.

But if you're ok with it being your hobby and indeed want this other route, that's great too.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

The reality of it is, at least in my experiences, you can get very far in life doing programming without needing a degree of sorts. Just the knowledge, certs., and over time you get to a higher level. Kind of sad when you think about how much college used to be a decision maker in job hunting in the IT field.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

I've thought of programming, but learning a language for me is tough, and I can barely edit code in the first place. I'm not sure what I want to do, but getting something into racing or car modding would be interesting. This also goes for the hardware side of PC's, but currently I'm not too sure what I want to do.

Maybe I'll start my own business where I just mod the crap out of things that people send me and make them cool. I've always wanted to get better in modding & craft anyways.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

I haven't seen someone who make modded PC parts to sell globally at a medium-big scale. I think that a service like that would be amazing and I'm sure a lot of folks around the world would be interested on something like this.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

No idea, Cruise ship technician?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

For the money or the pleasure of doing the job?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Both.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

B.S. in Petroleum Geology Minor in GIS.

Work for an engineering firm in the Geomatics department.

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  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

What do you do exactly? I've always had this question about chemists.

Anything is better than the army.

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  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Good to know that, I also felt as you do when I first got into programming, and now I feel it with my current job and that's something I didn't expect so I enjoy every minute of it.

[comment deleted by staff]

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