Description

Decided I needed a second PC in the house that would be at least semi capable of streaming games from my main rig. I got tired of carrying Operation X up and down three flights of stairs from my office to the rec-room every time we had a guest over and my office became another bedroom. As a huge fan of the Fallout series, I initially wanted to create a post-apocalyptic themed build with a budget in mind of around $750. I needed to procure a cheap case that fit the theme so I chose the Cooler Master HAF 912. I also wanted a black white theme for the interior of the case since I think they look so clean. The only other requirement that I had for the build was to use AMD components. I have never had an AMD powered machine and wanted to switch over and try the other side for this build. So far, I have no complaints on that decision. So far it has met my expectations; I have been able to game at high settings. I dialed it back from ultra as I was experiencing some occasional stutter in game, perhaps tweaking the settings more will get rid of that. As of today (04.12.2016) I have achieved a stable over clock of 4.4 GHz on the CPU and 1100 on the GPU. I have bumped the settings back up to ultra for the game I am currently playing and have not experienced any further stutter in game. Temps at CPU are running around 52C to 54C (these temps are in the basement which currently is about 22C) under full load of Prime95 on a blend test.

CPU:

As I said earlier I decided to go AMD for this build. I chose the FX-6300 based on decent reviews and the fact that it has some very decent over-clocking potential. It has not disappointed.

CPU Cooler:

Went with the Corsair H75 54.0 CFM AIO cooler based on my previous experience with the brand and that originally I was only going to have room for a 120MM cooler. The unit functions well and is currently keeping temps in check at the current over-clock. I plan to upgrade to a 240 or 280 MM in the near future.

Thermal Compound:

It is what it is. Currently seems to be performing well, only time will tell I guess.

Motherboard:

My initial budget for the MOBO was $100 so I wanted the best I could get for that. While there are many boards that were ranked better, many had colors schemes that I just didn’t like. I liked the black white theme of this board, decent (not great) reviews, and a fairly simple UI. The board has been very easy to work with. Hindsight always being 20/20, I should have gone for something better than the 4+1 phase on this board as the heat sinks do get pretty warm under a decent load. Perhaps an upgrade is the near future, I’ll have to see.

Memory:

Went with the Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400. I actually scavenged these from my previous build since I had no need for 32GB on it, just painted the covers to match this theme. I have had good luck with these sticks so far. Currently with the MOBO they can only work at 2133 MHz.

Storage:

I originally ordered an OCZ Arc 100 240GB for the boot drive. It showed up DOA, and as it was the weekend and I wanted to get this thing going, I headed to my nearest BestBuy. The Samsung in my previous build has worked very well so I ended up spending a little more and going that route.

Video Card:

Budget was initially $250 for a graphics card. I chose the MSI Radeon R9 380 4GB based on decent reviews. Temps stay pretty decent under load, low 60’s currently even with the clock at 1100 MHz. I do only game with this machine at 1080p.

Case:

Ok, where do I even start? I purchased the Cooler Master HAF 912. I like the looks of the case and it matched the idea I was going for theme wise. Got the case painted before I really looked things over as I did get impatient, lesson learned. Once you mount a 200 mm fan at the top of the case, there is no longer room for the Corsair H75 to mount at the rear and keep everything inside the case. Ok, I can deal with this; I decided to mount the H75 in the front top drive bays as I won’t be using them. I had to modify the 200 mm NZXT fan to fit at the top by removing 4 of the 8 mounting tabs. The 200 mm Bitfenix fan I decided to use for the front bottom of the case needed to be modified as well by removing 2 of the 12 mounting flanges. So on to mounting the H75 and fans, I needed to fabricate a bracket to hold them. I had a sheet of .375 polycarbonate lying around so I used that; it’s light, rigid, very heat resistant, and easy to work with. The sheet rests up against the drive guides in the front and is held from the rear with some small aluminum angle brackets, and all cushioned with thin rubber to kill any vibration or rattles. I can tell you that this cae totally lives up to its name in that it has some AMAZING airflow and cooling potential.

Power Supply:

I chose the EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular. I don’t like having extra cables that aren’t needed cluttering up the joint so went the full modular route. The supply had good reviews, gold cert, decent looking cables, and just looked plain sexy. Other than that, it does its job and seems to do it well so far.

Case Fans:

I used NZXT air flow series throughout the build, except for one Bitfenix fan at the front bottom of the case. The NZXT fans are quiet, move a good amount of air, and just look very nice with the led lighting.

Summary:

All in all, the build went very well and I am happy so far with the results. I do want to replace the BitFenix fan at the front with an NZXT fan that matches the rest in the near future. Total cost came in at just under $800 when all was said and done. I probably would have been right on budget had I not had to add the wifi adapter at the end since I couldn’t locate the extra that I thought I had. I look forward to hearing your feedback, concerns, suggestions.

Comments

  • 41 months ago
  • 3 points

Excellent job on the paint job and the basement work Eric !

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

How did you get the memory at 2133? I have the same mobo, cpu, and some 2400 ram but it will only run at 1866. I only have the cpu at 3.6 so maybe if I OC it more? Also how are you monitoring vrm temps and how well did the OC go for you? I want to get mine to about 4.1 or so. Nice paint job also!

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

For the ram to run at 2133 I had to enable the XMP profile and set the voltage at the 1.65 required for the chips. The mobo allowed to manually set it at 2133 but I found that it often didn't hold the setting for more than few boots. Not sure what the issue with that was but it has been stable at the 2133 for me once the XMP was enabled. The vrm temps I monitored with a handheld laser while I was stressing the system. I saw temps get upwards of 140 F but not by much. I have purchased 2 small fans that I plan to install over the top of them soon. The OC went pretty well up to 4.3, then I really ran into problems with stability, spent a tone of time on the over-clockers forum reading through the problems others encountered. 4.1 should be easy, the OC Genie on the mobo will take it to that. And thank you.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Very excellent case mod. How long did it take getting the paint and fabrication done?

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

I would say I spent around 8 hours on the case, that was not entirely at one time though, so may be a little more. Getting the PSU cover to fit was the hardest as you have to twist it in without hitting the mobo. Thank you.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build looks frickn sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!!! One question though how did you get the CPU and RAM monitor thingymajob at the top of your screen?????

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

I use Iobit Advanced Systemcare and it is one of the little add-ons you can use.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome build, how did you make the psu shroud? Like what material?

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

The PSU shroud is also made out of polycarbonate. It is 4 pieces (top, front, and 2 support brackets) all thermally welded on the underside.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

You did great making it look post-apocalyptic.

Good paint job. Nice part selection too.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

easily the cleanest HAF 912 build I have EVER seen. Well done man

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Excellent! +1

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 for the insane mod job with the paint and for it being a team RED build! It's kinda sorta similar in thought to my build but probably way more pimped. I love the custom paint job & that GPU. I used the same one and it kicks major arse in 1080p

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

With that color scheme you should of gone with the tan and brown noctua fans, even though you cant see them. Otherwise, great build and nice paint job!

+1

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Rad case idea. These sleeper builds are pretty slick. +1

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

GREAT JOB. I love the Haf912, but it was not pretty on the inside (not painted black). Love the black inside, the custom PSU shroud, and the external paint is AWESOME. GREAT WORK.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Well done on your cpu. I have a question, did u have to update your bios?

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you. I did not update the bios on the motherboard. I have since though swapped out the motherboard for an asus sabertooth 990fx R2.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for your response. But was your processor working fine with the krait edition? Because im getting the same processor and mobo and theres this message that i might need to update the bios. And i read some articles about it and it may affect the mobo.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, the fx-6300 worked flawlessly in my system with the Krait mobo. The only problem I did have was the vrm on the board did get very warm with the overclock I was running. I mounted a couple 40mm fans on the top of them and that did help a bit.

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  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you. The raw case was lightly scuffed to allow adhesion of the base coat of rust. I then used either sand or salt depending on the area and coverage I wanted to keep the rust color. Then a layer of the brown was applied. More sand or salt depending on the texture and coverage for the area. The final layers of yellow were applied. I then used fine texture scotch brite pads to remove all the the sand/salt from the case. A course scotch brite was used in the areas were deeper scratches were wanted. The case texture is awesome in person, the pictures don't quite do it justice, the finish is in no way smooth. And thank you to everyone for the fantastic compliments! It really made my morning. Best wishes to you all.

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  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem. The trick is to fog the paint from far enough away that you don't blow the salt and sand away. Once it starts to stick to the surface, you are good and can start laying the paint on more heavily. I practiced on a couple scraps of plexiglass first to see what kind of distances I needed at first.

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