Description

Hello, I'm Jason. This is my first time ever building/owning a desktop computer. I thought "instead of spending $700 on a gaming laptop, I could just make my own desktop for less money." I researched (googled) everything I could on building a desktop and came across this site. At first I was doing pretty well sticking to the budget but I slowly started falling into the the temptation of spending a little more for something I probably didn't need. Take the motherboard for instance, will I ever buy two graphics cards for sli/crossfire? Nope, but I thought "hey, it's nice to have the option to do that."

I spent endless nights reading reviews and watching unboxing videos of parts I picked and finally bought the first piece for my desktop; the motherboard. The 2nd part was the ram, which is the purchase I am most proud of because that same ram(at the time of writing this) is like $100 now. The part I regret buying the most is the CPU. I bought it on impulse because It had dropped $20 in price and I felt that I couldn't pass up on such a deal when in actuality it was still $300 dollars. Also I didn't know AMD had a beast of a CPU on the way, but I've come to terms with my choices in life. Around the time of purchasing the case, I realized that the $700 dollar budget was no longer possible when almost half the budget was spent on just the CPU.

In all honesty if I were to redo this build with what I actually needed I think I still would fail to hit that $700 mark. I applaud those that can restrain from that temptation of spending more. For this being my first build it wasn't as hard as I pictured it to be. I was extremely terrified of putting the CPU in the socket and applying the thermal paste but I completed this build with little to no errors (to my knowledge). I've spent a little under a year with this computer and I'm pretty happy with it. I don't have a graphics card in this build yet because of the price for one (especially since I was only trying to spend $700). Even without a graphics card I'm happy and I have to say I think I like windows 8.1 more than 7 (yes, I'm one of those people that just can't get jiggy with windows 10, once support ends for 8.1 I'm team LINUX).

I mostly use this desktop for watching videos, reading, coding, drawing and emulating games but I'll get a graphics card eventually to play those blockbuster games. I've learned when it comes to building a computer, those who wait are rewarded with a better end result. Half of the reason I built this pc was because I was tired of sites like canmypcrunit and game-debate telling me that my computer wasn't strong enough to run such and such but HOW ABOUT NOW huh?!?!(can't wait to get that graphics card to put those sites to shame). It still shocks me how fast my computer boots up. I'm so used to slow starts but now it's ridiculous how fast I can go from pressing the on button to using the computer, it's real nice. I'm hoping this computer will last me 5-8 years because that's the only way I can justify spending so much but I'm overall happy with my purchase. I'll do the parts review at a later time.

Comments

  • 28 months ago
  • 4 points

Hi, I'm Vergere, welcome to PC Anonymous, and I too, have a building addiction. I can't follow a budget, I draw my builds by hand, and my test bench is covered in tools and parts.

I wouldn't have it any other way, +1

  • 28 months ago
  • 2 points

At a budget of 700 dollars, I'd recommend a mix of used and new parts. Assuming you live in an urban area, it should be easy to find a used 4790k, a used 980ti (or buy a new 1070/1060), some random MOBO, some random cooler, some random HDD, some random SSD (250gb for less than $60), some random ram, and a new PSU case, and fans.

For the budget however, unless this is meant to be seriously upgraded, I can't help but feel like this is an unbalanced system for the price, an overkill cpu with no GPU and expensive fans. If you have to buy new, an i7-6600k with a 1060, corsair AF120's and a Hyper 212 evo.

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Next time I recommend choosing the core components first such as the CPU/GPU instead of getting a motherboard first. Putting some money towards a GPU instead of buying premium fans might have been a better idea too.

Whenever you get your GPU it should make for a very good system though.

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

$700 is really low and you came close, even with an I7 and all the Noctua's. I'd add an Optane module though. It'd really help with r/w speeds and still be budget friendly.

8 years is too long for any cpu, just enjoy a good overclock now and plan to upgrade in 4 years. ;-)

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't think Optane meets the requirements with this build. My understanding is that one would need a 7th Gen CPU and a Intel 200 series Motherboard. https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/optane-memory.html

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup, my bad. It would make more sense if it also worked with a 100 series board and Skylake though.