Description

Purpose of this was to make as clean as possible watercooled build using existing parts and minor case adaptations. Using power tools on a case is really something I have tried to stay away from, but it turned out to be much less scary than anticipated.

My previous builds have had flow lines going in all different directions and looked overall messy due to my need to add as much radiators as possible. In addition to adding more pumps than should be required for any sensible builds. So I wanted to continue with overdoing radiators and pumps but keep the visible tubing to a minimum. I also wanted there to be a clean run of the tubing that was possible. The best way of doing this would obviously be hard tubing, but I haven't worked up the courage to do that yet.

So the challenge was to make it look simple and clean with soft tubing. Not sure if people agree but I'm damn happy with how it turned out :)

Pros:

  • Clean and silent. Big improvement from my previous builds.

  • Over 9000 RGB.

  • Temps are good. Water temp is 3-6 degrees above ambient. Ambient is 25C in the CPU/GPU temperatures below.

  • Gotten 4.4Ghz stable out of 6800K with 1.35V. Way to much volt and it pumps out ridiculous amount of heat due to this.. but what is the purpose of this water cooling stuff if not to do just that.

Cons:

  • Due to all the bends and crap added to the loop it's horrible to drain and fill.

  • Flow to CPU sections is somewhat limited due to the parallel config.

  • Not hard tubing

  • 3 pumps was kinda stupid. Makes more issues then it potentially solves.

  • The Aquacomputer filter looks good but my experience is that it solves very little with respect to maintenance.

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Comments

  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

You did a really nice job with that soft tubing loop. Looks fantastic.

Nice build!

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Very clean build. It’s nice to see someone else use the Aquacomputer filter. Where did you get the LED plug for it? I couldn’t find the right fitting

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I actually had to remove the filter from the loop due to it being too restrictive for my setup. It has two valve openings of 5.43 mm that I think is the cause of the restriction. My tube internal diameter is 10mm. Once removed the water reached the CPU section of the parallel loop with allot more ease without cranking the pumps to high. You could argue that the blocks are also restrictive... but I can attest that the filter is very restrictive compared to the internal tubing diameter and that I got better flow (and seemingly head pressure) after removing it. A shame because I really liked the design and the feature to remove filter without draining.

Apparently this filter was first designed for 1/8" connectors. And that is why you are having trouble finding a connector for the LED port. Because that is still 1/8". So I had to purchase a Bitspower adapter (1/8"BSP > 1/4"BSP) and put a normal 1/4" LED into that again.

Hope this helps!

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you! Yes, that’s very helpful. Tbh if I hadn’t cut a hole in the front of my case to add the filter, I’d probably remove it too. But I had it on hand from my attempts to undo the damage done by Primochill Vue, so I wanted to use it. Fortunately I haven’t noticed any flow issues. Thank you for the info, and I’m glad you got the flow improved!

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Ouch... I'm very happy I wasn't able to acquire VUE before the reports from the users arrived. But is the filter able to catch the VUE particles? It did very little to catch the nano particles from my pastel disaster. Any pictures for what the filter catches?

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah you got lucky there! I was in the first preorder batch to ship. Unfortunately I don’t really have any evidence if it actually caught anything. It could very well be completely useless. My troubles with Vue were documented on the LTT forums, you can search my username or for Vue to see the whole month long process of cleaning out the loop. (Yikes)

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice build! But why does the loop go through the two GPUs then through the CPU and back through the GPUs? Doesn't the water get warm by the time it has gone through the CPU?

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

In my setup the same water enters GPU1, GPU2 and CPU at the same time :)

I think EK explains this better than I can so I will link to their material:

Parallel and Serial flow

Does Loop Order Matter?

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry for my misunderstanding but if water is flowing up both tubes, where does the warm water from the cpu block go and there would be no flow?

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

With respect to "Warm water": Read this first or watch this.

As stated on the EKWB site the flow is split into three. So if we simplify it further it enters with the same "cold" water and exists with the same "warm" water.

So in my loop it looks kinda like this

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 21 months ago
  • 6 points

The PC drives him...

  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

Can't run Crysis on a car.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Please keep feedback polite and constructive.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!