Description

This was built to handle 4K gaming plus home media duties.

The R7 1700 and GTX 1080 Ti together handle 4K gaming on a 60Hz monitor fantastically well.

An i7-7700K would be better if using a monitor with a higher refresh rate and a lower resolution, but that's not the use case here, and affordable high refresh rate 4K monitors (not to mention the GPUs to drive them) are a while away yet.

The rest of the system is tailored to specific needs for media playback and storage. The WD Reds are reliable mass storage. The Crucial MX300 is very economical mass storage for an SSD. And the Samsung 960 Evo is an incredibly fast system drive that's also big enough to fit several favorite games and programs onto.

I've included some benchmarks FYI.

Hope you enjoy, please comment or question below and I'll do my best to reply, or feel free to look me up on Facebook where I'm Sensible Systems.

Comments

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

Awesome, looks cool. Very performance orientated. You didn't cut any corners, you got the parts you needed for the performance you wanted. No unnecessary/overkill parts.

Awesome job!

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Appreciate the comment and the compliment :-)

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

It's not that far away actually! The ROG Swift PG27UQ is a 4k 144hz monitor estimated to launch q3 this year but will cost almost 2000 dollars.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Acer has one coming too, but it's the 'affordable' bit that I think is a while away still. Probably be $3000+ to get one of these in Australia, sadly.

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

what happened to RGB all the things

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

:D

Man, I had to struggle not to turn off the few LEDs that did manage to get into this build! But it was built for a customer, so I left that up to them.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Sleek, powerful, simple; all you can ask for. +1
did you have any issues installing the M.2? (regarding disabled SATA slots)

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

Hi, yes, I had a lot of trouble installing the m.2 drive. First, I just made a silly mistake and thought it only disabled one SATA port when in fact it disables two. So, I had to get a PCIe add-in card to get a few more SATA ports so I had enough to plug everything in. (Embarrassing but not too costly.) The biggest problem was the board would not recognize the m.2 drive or let me boot from it. I tried BIOS fiddling. That didn't help. I tried a different NVMe m.2 from a working system (an Intel 600p). The board recognized and booted from that. Then I tried the 960 Evo again and it was recognized and bootable. I guess this was a driver issue, maybe, and the already-working 600p somehow gave the Ryzen setup what it needed to work with a brand new NVMe drive... but I really don't know and I'm just glad I got it sorted!

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

hey thanks for the reply, I'm glad you got it sorted out. For me I had a similar problem two HDDs and an SSD so I had to figure out that despite what the Asus Z270 PRIME-AR manual said, it DOES disable two SATA slots. Now I have the drives in slots 3-5 and everything works great (I have a 960 PRO 512Gb instead)

  • 29 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, working on a similar build. Did you point PSU fan up or down?

  • 29 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, the PSU was fan down - good luck with your build!

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  • 31 months ago
  • 3 points

Right?! AMD's stock cooler game is on point.